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Ralph M Brown Act

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1993 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a dozen years of being stymied by Thousand Oaks officials, a Los Angeles developer plans to sue the city for $10 million, using a judge's ruling that officials acted illegally in blocking him from developing his land. Although Nedjatollah Cohan lost a lawsuit last week against the city to develop his 47-acre parcel in Newbury Park, the judge in the case agreed that the city violated local and state laws in appealing the city Planning Commission's decision favoring the project.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1992
Los Angeles City Councilwoman Joy Picus on Tuesday urged the city attorney's office to determine whether planning officials violated the state's open-meeting law by acting on a matter concerning the planning blueprint for Warner Center, allegedly without adequate public notification. In her motion before the City Council, Picus also asked that the city's lawyers make recommendations to "guarantee full public participation" in the Planning Commission's deliberations.
NEWS
March 2, 1995
All five members of the Board of Supervisors appeared before the Orange County Chamber of Commerce & Industry in Irvine on Wednesday and because of the Brown Act--which prohibits a majority of the group from meeting together without advance public notice--the board took some unusual steps. Prohibited from "deliberating," board members addressed the audience and then, one by one, left the room after they spoke. Supervisor Gaddi H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1998
Two West Covina City Council members canceled plans to attend a retreat at a desert resort today after questions were raised over whether the event would violate California's open meetings law. Four of West Covina's five council members were scheduled to participate in the West Covina Chamber of Commerce's two-day retreat at the Pala Mesa Resort in Fallbrook, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster officials who bought 22.5 acres of parkland for $1.1 million last December--paying 45% more than the seller had paid just three years earlier--say they felt no need to get an appraisal first. But at least one veteran appraiser believes the city made a big mistake and is saying so.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County district attorney's office is looking into whether Costa Mesa officials violated the state open meeting law during discussions earlier this year about the Home Ranch development proposal. The prosecutor is studying complaints by a Costa Mesa resident that the city violated the Brown Act when two members of the City Council, two members of the Planning Commission, city staff and representatives of developer C.J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster officials, faced with allegations that the City Council has been violating the state's open meetings law, promised Wednesday that the council will make future real estate decisions in public and reveal the prices paid. The decision came after The Times reported Saturday that the council voted behind closed doors last month to authorize purchase of downtown-area properties and did not reveal what it planned to pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Councilman Ernani Bernardi has sued the city of Los Angeles, claiming that two closed-door meetings to discuss a community redevelopment project violated the state's public meeting law. Bernardi, who served 32 years on the council before retiring in June, filed a lawsuit Monday in a downtown Superior Court, asking that a judge invalidate the decisions reached in closed sessions and force the city to hold new meetings on the issue in public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a particularly contentious meeting of the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, Supervisor Gloria Molina accused fellow board members of repeatedly violating the Brown Act, a state law regulating meetings of elected government bodies. The board meeting also took on political overtones when Molina tangled with Supervisor Deane Dana over his position on a controversial pension plan.
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