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Ralph M Brown Act

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1999 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid piles of papers and backbreaking books in his La Verne home, chemistry instructor Richard McKee sits in his oak chair, trying to unlock secrets. Not the secrets of hydrocarbons or nucleotides--but the secrets of Claremont City Hall. This time, McKee is scouring his notes to figure out how to force the city to divulge a settlement of a recent federal court lawsuit. Last time, his cause was outing the private deliberations of his own colleagues at Pasadena City College.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Months after ruling that the trustees of South Orange County Community College District acted illegally by making decisions in secret, an Orange County judge awarded $98,000 in attorney fees this week to a professor who filed a lawsuit against the district. Roy Bauer, a philosophy professor at Irvine Valley College, has sued the district twice for violating the state's Brown Act, which requires that public meeting be open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many local government officials routinely break the California law that requires them to conduct the public's business in public, a veteran city attorney has asserted in remarks that support suspicions long held by outsiders that the law often is not followed. James L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1998 | JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In what critics called a violation of California's open meeting laws, the Lynwood City Council voted at a special session to fire the city attorney and remove the city manager. After discussion in closed session Wednesday night, three councilmen--Paul Richards, Ricardo Sanchez and Louis Byrd--publicly voted to terminate the contract of attorney Francisco Leal and remove Faustin Gonzales as city manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1998
Two West Covina City Council members canceled plans to attend a retreat at a desert resort today after questions were raised over whether the event would violate California's open meetings law. Four of West Covina's five council members were scheduled to participate in the West Covina Chamber of Commerce's two-day retreat at the Pala Mesa Resort in Fallbrook, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1997
Pasadena activists said Tuesday that they were considering a lawsuit against the city to forestall the extension of the controversial city manager's contract. The Pasadena City Council extended City Manager Phil Hawkey's contract by two years in a closed-door meeting April 8. After an uproar from activists and union leaders that the vote violated the Brown Act requiring open meetings, the council revisited the matter during its meeting Monday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1997
The Pasadena City Council will decide Monday in open session whether to extend the city manager's contract for two years after local union leaders questioned whether a yes vote on the issue taken two weeks ago behind closed doors may have violated the state's open meeting law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1997
Few things have had greater beneficial impact on government bodies than shedding some light on their actions, although the agencies themselves have often fought the glare of the public eye. The Ralph M. Brown Act, named for the speaker of the state Assembly in the 1959-60 session, over the years has established the right of the public to have advance notice of meetings of local government bodies, open hearings and other access.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1995 | Times Wire Services
A major consumer group has accused California regulators of violating the state's open-meeting laws by deliberating in secret on plans to open electricity markets to competition. Members of the California Public Utilities Commission denied the charges, which were made this week in a letter and public comment from Audrie Krause, executive director of Toward Utility Rate Normalization, at the commission's biweekly meeting.
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