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Ralph M Brown Act

NEWS
October 2, 1992 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson has vetoed legislation that would have allowed local governments to distribute clean needles to drug users as part of comprehensive efforts to stop the spread of the deadly AIDS virus, his office announced Thursday. Wilson, completing action on hundreds of bills sent to his desk at the end of the legislative session, also rejected two measures that would have expanded the state's open-meeting law.
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NEWS
June 5, 1992 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill aimed at increasing the public's right to know what their city councils, school boards and county supervisors are up to was narrowly passed by the Senate and sent to the Assembly on Thursday. The bill, opposed by a variety of cities, water agencies, school districts and the Wilson Administration's Department of Finance, won approval on a 22-7 vote, one more than the simple majority required. Its fate in the Assembly is uncertain. Carried by Sen. Quentin L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Board members of the Antelope Valley Union High School District appear to have violated state law by holding a two-hour private meeting last week with Los Angeles County officials to develop a bailout plan for the financially troubled district, attorneys said Thursday. District officials have insisted that they were entitled to meet privately. But they have given varying and, sometimes conflicting, legal justifications for the closed session.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1992
Lancaster officials, faced with allegations that the City Council has been violating the state's open meeting law, promised Wednesday that the council will make future real estate decisions in public and reveal the prices paid. The decision came after The Times reported Saturday that the council voted behind closed doors last month to authorize purchase of downtown area properties and did not reveal what it planned to pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster officials, faced with allegations that the City Council has been violating the state's open meetings law, promised Wednesday that the council will make future real estate decisions in public and reveal the prices paid. The decision came after The Times reported Saturday that the council voted behind closed doors last month to authorize purchase of downtown-area properties and did not reveal what it planned to pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster officials who bought 22.5 acres of parkland for $1.1 million last December--paying 45% more than the seller had paid just three years earlier--say they felt no need to get an appraisal first. But at least one veteran appraiser believes the city made a big mistake and is saying so.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the second time in recent months, city officials in Lancaster are pursuing major real estate purchases without obtaining appraisals and while meeting in private, practices that both violate state laws, legal observers say. On the heels of a controversial $1.1-million parkland purchase in December that was approved behind closed doors and without an appraisal, city officials this month again decided in private to negotiate for or purchase 12 downtown-area parcels after appraising only two.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1992
Los Angeles City Councilwoman Joy Picus on Tuesday urged the city attorney's office to determine whether planning officials violated the state's open-meeting law by acting on a matter concerning the planning blueprint for Warner Center, allegedly without adequate public notification. In her motion before the City Council, Picus also asked that the city's lawyers make recommendations to "guarantee full public participation" in the Planning Commission's deliberations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
An honest person has nothing to hide. That simple precept nags at me whenever I stand in the hallway of a government building, waiting until elected officials finish conducting their business behind closed doors. When the meeting ends, often hours later, I join the other reporters scurrying around trying to find out what happened. Usually, the conspiracy of silence holds. These public servants are as tight-lipped as mob bosses. What, I wonder, do they have to hide? Often, it's plenty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city planning officials suspended a recent action concerning the Warner Center Specific Plan because homeowners complained that they were kept in the dark about the meeting at which the decision was made, contending that the state's open meeting law had been violated.
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