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Ralph Morrell

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April 7, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Morrell, the self-styled citizen activist who for a decade has pestered the Legislature to correct abuses and excesses, on Thursday recruited Senate President Pro Tem David A. Roberti for his crusade. Appearing a bit self-conscious at a press conference where he sat shoulder to shoulder with Morrell, Roberti (D-Los Angeles) announced that he has agreed to sponsor legislation to more fully disclose how much of the taxpayers' money the lawmakers spend on themselves.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Citizen reformer Ralph Morrell, a World War II sailor who has crusaded for a decade against what he sees as the Legislature's unrestrained spending on itself, finally celebrated his own "V-Day" on Thursday. "Morrell beat the Legislature," one veteran lawmaker muttered as the Senate voted unanimously to pass a Morrell-sponsored bill subjecting a legislator's spending to detailed public audits.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Citizen reformer Ralph Morrell, a World War II sailor who has crusaded for a decade against what he sees as the Legislature's unrestrained spending on itself, finally celebrated his own "V-Day" on Thursday. "Morrell beat the Legislature," one veteran lawmaker muttered as the Senate voted unanimously to pass a Morrell-sponsored bill subjecting a legislator's spending to detailed public audits.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Morrell, the self-styled citizen activist who for a decade has pestered the Legislature to correct abuses and excesses, on Thursday recruited Senate President Pro Tem David A. Roberti for his crusade. Appearing a bit self-conscious at a press conference where he sat shoulder to shoulder with Morrell, Roberti (D-Los Angeles) announced that he has agreed to sponsor legislation to more fully disclose how much of the taxpayers' money the lawmakers spend on themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1991
The deficiencies of Sacramento are many, but since The Times chose to address the "latest casualties of Proposition 140," the term-limiting and legislative budget-cutting initiative (editorial, June 14), we present this alternative view. It was not the intent of Proposition 140 to cause the closure of the "offices of legislative analyst and auditor general" (properly denounced by The Times), but to abolish the unreported, unrecorded, unbridled and unaudited legislative "slush-fund" spending of taxpayer resources for such items as $500-gold rings, tie tacks, gourmet meals, first-class air travel and other excesses, about which The Times itself has complained.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
In what could be the last action of its kind, Gov. George Deukmejian on Thursday signed legislation raising the salaries of state lawmakers by 10%, from $40,816 to $44,898 a year. Legislators have been empowered to increase their own salaries by 5% each year since 1966, when California voters approved a constitutional amendment that, in effect, made lawmaking a full-time occupation. Over the years, the Legislature generally has opted for one 10% raise every two years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Depending on who's talking, the leaders of the effort to recall State Sen. David A. Roberti (D-Van Nuys) are an eclectic coalition of madder-than-hell good-government proponents or a secretive bunch of vindictive gun nuts. Recall advocates claim to be grass-roots reformers who see Roberti, who was the powerful state Senate president pro tempore for 13 years, as epitomizing a political system gone haywire with soft-on-crime liberalism, corruption, arrogance and deal-making.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | KEN HOOVER, United Press International
One day last month, Assemblyman Art Agnos was on an airplane en route to a dinner in Los Angeles while he was being recorded as voting on at least half a dozen bills on the Assembly floor. The votes were an example of the widespread--and illegal--practice of "ghost voting," where an Assembly colleague, often a member sitting at an adjoining desk, casts a member's vote for him.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite angry protests by a long parade of public witnesses, a voter-approved salary commission Friday unanimously granted substantial pay raises to statewide elected officials and all members of the Legislature. The governor's annual salary will rise from $102,000 to $120,000. Legislators will receive an increase from $40,816 to $52,500--a 28.6% jump. Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) and Senate President Pro Tem David A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2002
The seven statewide propositions appearing on the Nov. 5 ballot: PROPOSITION 46 Housing and Emergency Shelter Trust Fund Bond Act Would create a $2.1-billion trust fund to build and refurbish low-income housing and expand shelters for battered women and homeless families with children. Includes repairs and improvements to apartments for families and disabled citizens; military veteran homeownership assistance; and security improvements and repairs to existing emergency shelters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Depending on who's talking, the leaders of a recently qualified effort to recall state Sen. David A. Roberti (D-Van Nuys) are an eclectic coalition of madder-than-hell proponents of good government or a secretive bunch of vindictive gun nuts. Recall advocates claim to be reformers who see Roberti, the powerful Senate president pro tempore for 13 years, as epitomizing a political system gone haywire with soft-on-crime liberalism, corruption, arrogance and deal-making.
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