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Ralph Neves

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October 29, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Neves was around at the wrong time, all right. When Santa Anita runs the seven Breeders' Cup races worth $10 million Saturday, the 70-year-old Neves will be watching on television at his home near the San Francisco airport and remembering what his riding career was like. It took Neves 31 years, and more than 25,000 races, for his mounts to earn $13.7 million.
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SPORTS
June 6, 2012 | By Brian Cronin
HORSE RACING URBAN LEGEND : A jockey was declared dead after falling from his horse but recovered and won five races the following day. A big part of the world of sports legends is the all-too clever newspaper headline. In the past, I've covered the story of the Dizzy Dean head injury that supposedly led to the headline "X-ray of Dean's head shows nothing" (click here for the real story). Today, we look at another classic headline, this time courtesy of the May 9, 1936 edition of the San Francisco Examiner.
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SPORTS
July 8, 1995 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Neves, a Hall of Fame jockey who walked out of a mortuary after he had been declared dead by a track physician at Bay Meadows in 1936, died in his sleep early Friday in a nursing home in San Marcos. Neves, who won 3,771 races, among them 173 stakes, had been ill for several years and recently was undergoing treatment for lung cancer. Accounts of his age differed, but family members said he was 79. Neves was voted into the Racing Hall of Fame in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.
SPORTS
July 8, 1995 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Neves, a Hall of Fame jockey who walked out of a mortuary after he had been declared dead by a track physician at Bay Meadows in 1936, died in his sleep early Friday in a nursing home in San Marcos. Neves, who won 3,771 races, among them 173 stakes, had been ill for several years and recently was undergoing treatment for lung cancer. Accounts of his age differed, but family members said he was 79. Neves was voted into the Racing Hall of Fame in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.
SPORTS
June 6, 2012 | By Brian Cronin
HORSE RACING URBAN LEGEND : A jockey was declared dead after falling from his horse but recovered and won five races the following day. A big part of the world of sports legends is the all-too clever newspaper headline. In the past, I've covered the story of the Dizzy Dean head injury that supposedly led to the headline "X-ray of Dean's head shows nothing" (click here for the real story). Today, we look at another classic headline, this time courtesy of the May 9, 1936 edition of the San Francisco Examiner.
SPORTS
May 19, 1989
Trainer Charlie Whittingham was asked if he was considering blinkers for Sunday Silence after the colt's zigzag stretch run to victory in the Kentucky Derby. "I'm not the greatest blinkers man," Whittingham said. "It's usually riders and owners that are always pushing for you to use blinkers." Whittingham recalled a time that former jockey Ralph Neves rode a horse that finished up the track. Afterward, Neves said to Whittingham: "I think you need to put blinkers on this horse."
SPORTS
March 2, 1996 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hasn't time passed Charlie Whittingham by?" asked a horseman from Florida. The Hall of Fame trainer, who will be 83 on April 13, is making no such concession. Although Howard Keck, his biggest and oldest client, is selling all of his horses and leaving the game, Whittingham is still in the fray.
SPORTS
November 16, 1987 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Robert Hyatt (Red) McDaniel, the winningest trainer in the United States through the first five years of the 1950s, was hydrophobic. The only way to get McDaniel into a swimming pool would have been to fill it with martinis. On May 5, 1955, the 44-year-old McDaniel helped jockey Ralph Neves mount a 5-year-old gelding running in the sixth race at Golden Gate Fields.
SPORTS
September 13, 1994 | JIM MURRAY
Jockey Ray York, packing 120 pounds, finished last in a derby at Del Mar the other day. "Wait a minute!" you say. "Ray York? What kind of a time warp is this? Ray York hasn't been on a racetrack in 10 years. What is this, 1953?" Besides, Ray York wouldn't finish last on a rocking horse. He won the Kentucky Derby, no less. Not many jockeys can make that claim. Ray rode the great Determine in his best years.
SPORTS
October 22, 2003 | Bob Mieszerski, Times Staff Writer
A crowd of about 700 said goodbye to Bill Shoemaker on Tuesday at Santa Anita, the scene of many of his greatest triumphs. During a 40-minute memorial service in the winner's circle, Shoemaker, who died in his sleep at 72 on Oct. 12, was remembered in a eulogy by Father Jack Foley and in tributes by fellow jockeys and friends.
SPORTS
October 29, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Neves was around at the wrong time, all right. When Santa Anita runs the seven Breeders' Cup races worth $10 million Saturday, the 70-year-old Neves will be watching on television at his home near the San Francisco airport and remembering what his riding career was like. It took Neves 31 years, and more than 25,000 races, for his mounts to earn $13.7 million.
SPORTS
December 7, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the ways Twilight Agenda has earned $1.5 million is to sneak up on the opposition. The 5-year-old son of Devil's Bag won't have that advantage Sunday in the $100,000 Native Diver Handicap at Hollywood Park. Unaccustomed to being favored, Twilight Agenda is a cinch to be the public choice in the 1 1/8-mile Native Diver, which drew only four other horses--Stalwart Charger, Defensive Play, Ibero and Cobra Classic.
SPORTS
May 31, 2008 | Bill Dwyre
One can carry family togetherness to extremes, which is what George O'Bryan has done. He is 87 now, retired for 20 years from the business of being a jockey agent. He lives in Arcadia, with his wife, Mercedes, whom he met at Santa Anita, where she was an usherette. From that union came a son, Craig, who also became a jockey agent, and a daughter, Shannon, who was not named after the city in Ireland, but after a racehorse.
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