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Ralph P Davidson

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NEWS
July 29, 1987
The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts' board of trustees, after a yearlong search, named retiring Time Inc. executive Ralph P. Davidson as president and chief executive officer. Chairman Roger L. Stevens, 77, who led the fund raising to build the Washington center and has guided its programming since it opened in 1971, will hold the title of founder chairman. Davidson, 59, will quit as chairman of Time Inc.'s executive board to join the center Feb. 1, 1988.
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NEWS
October 26, 1989 | Associated Press
Ralph P. Davidson announced Wednesday that he will resign as chairman of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts when his contract expires in February, 1991, because of differences with the center's board of trustees. Davidson, a former Time Inc. executive, took command of the national arts center less than two years ago. He is reported to have drawn complaints from the Kennedy Center board of trustees for being a poor manager and the focus of personality clashes.
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NEWS
October 26, 1989 | Associated Press
Ralph P. Davidson announced Wednesday that he will resign as chairman of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts when his contract expires in February, 1991, because of differences with the center's board of trustees. Davidson, a former Time Inc. executive, took command of the national arts center less than two years ago. He is reported to have drawn complaints from the Kennedy Center board of trustees for being a poor manager and the focus of personality clashes.
NEWS
July 29, 1987
The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts' board of trustees, after a yearlong search, named retiring Time Inc. executive Ralph P. Davidson as president and chief executive officer. Chairman Roger L. Stevens, 77, who led the fund raising to build the Washington center and has guided its programming since it opened in 1971, will hold the title of founder chairman. Davidson, 59, will quit as chairman of Time Inc.'s executive board to join the center Feb. 1, 1988.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1987
First Interstate Bancorp. Los Angeles, elected as a director Ralph P. Davidson, chairman of the executive committee of Time Inc. and former chairman of the publishing company.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1990 | From Times wire services
A search committee today is expected to recommend that James D. Wolfensohn, chairman of Carnegie Hall in New York City, be named chairman of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, a spokeswoman says. Ralph P. Davidson, the Kennedy Center's current chairman and president, asked that his contract not be renewed when it expires in February, 1991. While Wolfensohn, 56, is to be named chairman, he will not also hold the post of president, The Washington Post said in today's editions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1987 | HILLIARD HARPER, Times Staff Writer
The future of the arts in America will depend on the linking of business, local government and the arts in a mutual support role that can earn business priceless good will. That was the key message from the chairman of Time Inc.'s executive committee to 271 community leaders, including Mayor Maureen O'Connor and 150 local chief executive officers, who attended a Thursday luncheon on business and the arts.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1986 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Time Inc., struggling to rein in costs, announced a management shuffle on Wednesday that will make Nicholas J. Nicholas Jr., a 46-year-old financial whiz who now heads its video division, president and chief operating officer on Sept. 1. In a three-way management shift, President and Chief Executive J. Richard Munro, 55, will remain chief executive and will add the chairman's title. The current chairman, Ralph P. Davidson, 58, meanwhile, will become chairman of the executive committee.
NEWS
December 4, 1987 | Marylouise Oates
For this weekend, it's Hollywood on the Potomac.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1987 | CINDY SKRZYCKI, The Washington Post
In the end, it seemed as if Richard J. Ferris, chairman of Allegis Corp., couldn't do anything right. But when the day came for his ouster from the company he had been with for 17 years, he floated quietly away, his "golden parachute" unfurled--all $3 million worth. It wasn't a reward for outstanding performance. In the last few months, it became clear that Ferris had big problems.
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