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January 14, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Book Review
Ralph Rugoff has an amazing knack for digging up weird stuff. Well, that's not entirely true: What he actually does is direct our attention toward places and events right under our noses that we take for granted, that have the capacity to blossom into things strange and beautiful when examined closely. Manhole covers, Los Angeles' sewage system, nudist colonies, freeway overpasses--we're all familiar with them, but they ignite Rugoff's imagination and send him searching for pen and paper.
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July 5, 2012 | By Marcia Adair
LONDON -- For those who leave modern art exhibitions feeling like Charlie Brown after Lucy has yanked the football yet again, take heart. From now until Aug. 5, you can head to the Hayward Gallery in London, plunk down 8 pounds and see absolutely nothing. Mostly. "Invisible: Art About the Unseen 1957-2012" is not, according to gallery director Ralph Rugoff, a publicity stunt, but rather a meditation on seeing.  “I often go to museums and see people walking through galleries of great art in a drive-by manner," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2006
I found Suzanne Muchnic's article on Ralph Rugoff fascinating -- and illuminating ["As Seen in the Eye of the Beholder," Feb. 12]. Let's see if I've got it straight about this exhibit by the "brainy, shy" Mr. Rugoff. He wants the viewer to become more engaged by using "what you bring" to the exhibit, which consists of such "Invisible Art" as: a sculpture of a column of air, the ghost of Andy Warhol on a pedestal, paintings rendered in water that has evaporated, a movie shot with no film in the camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2006
I found Suzanne Muchnic's article on Ralph Rugoff fascinating -- and illuminating ["As Seen in the Eye of the Beholder," Feb. 12]. Let's see if I've got it straight about this exhibit by the "brainy, shy" Mr. Rugoff. He wants the viewer to become more engaged by using "what you bring" to the exhibit, which consists of such "Invisible Art" as: a sculpture of a column of air, the ghost of Andy Warhol on a pedestal, paintings rendered in water that has evaporated, a movie shot with no film in the camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Marcia Adair
LONDON -- For those who leave modern art exhibitions feeling like Charlie Brown after Lucy has yanked the football yet again, take heart. From now until Aug. 5, you can head to the Hayward Gallery in London, plunk down 8 pounds and see absolutely nothing. Mostly. "Invisible: Art About the Unseen 1957-2012" is not, according to gallery director Ralph Rugoff, a publicity stunt, but rather a meditation on seeing.  “I often go to museums and see people walking through galleries of great art in a drive-by manner," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
RALPH RUGOFF has a message for all you lazy art viewers: Get to work. Not that he would state it so rudely. The director of the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, a forum for presentation and discussion of contemporary culture at the California College of the Arts, is a gentle persuader. He's a brainy, shy person who slips provocative ideas into exhibitions and catalog essays and lets them develop as they will.
NEWS
February 16, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic
Ralph Rugoff, director of the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco, has been named director of the Hayward Gallery at the South Bank Centre in London. Known for organizing unorthodox group exhibitions and writing provocative essays on contemporary art, Rugoff recently won a $100,000 award from the Penny McCall Foundation for his work.
NEWS
July 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Christie's International announced Wednesday that it has launched a multimedia program that will allow online clients to participate at live salesroom auctions in real time. "Christie's Live means that collectors and enthusiasts around the world will be able to enjoy the look, sound and feel of Christie's auctions from their personal computer," the auction house said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic
"As members of a democratic society we should regard monuments with a certain amount of suspicion," curator Ralph Rugoff writes in the catalog of his latest exhibition at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco. "They unambiguously assert that this leader was heroic, these fallen soldiers were patriots, this event should never be forgotten. Built to endure, they present a particular vision of history as though it were an inarguable and eternal truth." Rugoff decided to fight back.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
RALPH RUGOFF has a message for all you lazy art viewers: Get to work. Not that he would state it so rudely. The director of the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, a forum for presentation and discussion of contemporary culture at the California College of the Arts, is a gentle persuader. He's a brainy, shy person who slips provocative ideas into exhibitions and catalog essays and lets them develop as they will.
BOOKS
January 14, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Book Review
Ralph Rugoff has an amazing knack for digging up weird stuff. Well, that's not entirely true: What he actually does is direct our attention toward places and events right under our noses that we take for granted, that have the capacity to blossom into things strange and beautiful when examined closely. Manhole covers, Los Angeles' sewage system, nudist colonies, freeway overpasses--we're all familiar with them, but they ignite Rugoff's imagination and send him searching for pen and paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
London's Hayward Gallery recently showed a survey of seminal outsider artists of the last few decades, including “cosmic” painter Paul Laffoley, doll maker Morton Bartlett and Wisconsin baker-horticulturist, Eugene von Bruenchenhein. The exhibition, “Alternative Guide to the Universe,” which ran from June 11 to Aug. 26 -- got some posthumous attention Wednesday when Hyperallergic.com  asked why 91.3% of the participating artists were male. Only two of the artists in the show -- Lee Godie and Guo Fengyi -- were female.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"I had it all wrong. I thought there would be a public outcry against the exhibition and a supportive critical response," said Paul Schimmel, curator of "Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s," as the controversial show approached today's closing. "Instead, the public has loved it. We have had about 100,000 visitors, a phenomenal number for a contemporary art show. They keep coming back and writing favorable comments.
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