Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRalph Saul
IN THE NEWS

Ralph Saul

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 19, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drexel Burnham Lambert Group, in bankruptcy proceedings, announced Wednesday that its board is being reorganized to give outsiders a majority and said John S. R. Shad had stepped down as chairman. Ralph S. Saul, a current Drexel board member and former chairman of Cigna Corp., was elected to succeed Shad, who will remain on the board as an outside director. Drexel also announced management changes that will consolidate the power of John F.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 19, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drexel Burnham Lambert Group, in bankruptcy proceedings, announced Wednesday that its board is being reorganized to give outsiders a majority and said John S. R. Shad had stepped down as chairman. Ralph S. Saul, a current Drexel board member and former chairman of Cigna Corp., was elected to succeed Shad, who will remain on the board as an outside director. Drexel also announced management changes that will consolidate the power of John F.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW and TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writers
Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. agreed Thursday to settle Securities and Exchange Commission civil charges against the investment firm under terms that will require sweeping supervision of its activities but will allow its hugely profitable "junk bond" department to remain in Beverly Hills. The agreement opened the way for the appointment of a new chairman for Drexel's parent company, John S. R. Shad, who is a former SEC chairman, and two new outside directors. Shad will replace Robert E. Linton, who will continue as a director of the firm.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW and TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writers
Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. agreed Thursday to settle Securities and Exchange Commission civil charges against the investment firm under terms that will require sweeping supervision of its activities but will allow its hugely profitable "junk bond" department to remain in Beverly Hills. The agreement opened the way for the appointment of a new chairman for Drexel's parent company, John S. R. Shad, who is a former SEC chairman, and two new outside directors. Shad will replace Robert E. Linton, who will continue as a director of the firm.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1989 | From Reuters
Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. Chairman John S. R. Shad said Wednesday that the federal investigation of insider trading "may well uncover additional infractions" at the Wall Street investment banking firm. But Shad, a former chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, said he believes that "the bulk of the problems are behind the firm." Drexel agreed at the end of last year to plead guilty to six felony counts of mail, wire and securities fraud and to pay fines of $650 million in the government's massive probe of insider trading on Wall Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Marvin Saul was a uranium miner who had gone bust when he flipped a coin in the late 1950s to decide where to strike out next from Utah. Heads meant Los Angeles; tails Dallas. Heads, and generations of future deli-goers on the Westside, won out. With 35 cents in his pocket, Saul arrived in Los Angeles, did odd jobs and by 1957 had cobbled together $300 to open a small sandwich shop. Two years later, he established Junior's, an eight-table delicatessen that grew "into a sort of IBM of the bagel and blintz world," the Wall Street Journal reported in 1990.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1989 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
John S. R. Shad, who agreed Thursday to become chairman of Drexel Burnham Lambert's holding company, is a former Securities and Exchange Commission chairman known for strong convictions on ethics and free-market economics. During an SEC chairmanship that lasted between 1981 and 1987, the long-time E. F. Hutton investment banker presided over the agency's most far-ranging investigation of Wall Street corruption. He was personally shocked at the lawbreaking, friends say, and in 1987 pledged $30 million--most of his fortune--to set up a business ethics program at Harvard University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2004 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Frederick R. Karl, a literary scholar known for his mammoth biographies of William Faulkner, Joseph Conrad and other figures, died of kidney disease April 30 in New York City. He was 77. Karl, a professor emeritus of both City College of New York and New York University, wrote or edited more than a dozen books, including major reference volumes on modern English and American fiction and a novel set during World War II.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|