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Ralph Stanley

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When he was growing up in Stratton, Va., Ralph Stanley had a choice: His aunt Roxie was selling a pig for $5, and a banjo for the same price. As much as young Ralph had a hankering to raise some hogs, he chose the banjo. More than a half-century has passed since then, during which time Stanley has become one of the certifiable legends of bluegrass music.
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NEWS
June 13, 2002
* Korn, "Untouchables," Epic/Immortal. The nu-metal pioneers take a more languid approach akin to the mechanical eroticism of Nine Inch Nails, the bleak harmonies of Alice in Chains and even the melodious musings of Staind.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1998 | Randy Lewis
It's easy to understand why a sky full of country and folk stars--headed by Bob Dylan, Dwight Yoakam and Vince Gill--would want to pay tribute to bluegrass giant Ralph Stanley by joining him on this two-CD set of stone-traditional bluegrass, country and gospel nuggets. The attraction of songs expressing primal human desires, dreams, fears and sorrows is even stronger given contemporary country music's evasion of those themes in favor of warm and fuzzy feel-goodism.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2001 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Buena Vista Social Club wrote the book on how to package a bunch of reveredelders and bring them from a roots-music niche into the light of the mainstream. But now it looks as if there's a U.S. variation on that Cuban mission. The soundtrack album from the Coen brothers' film "O Brother, Where Art Thou?," a collection of vintage and newly recorded versions of traditional Southern songs, has claw-hammered its way to No.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Stanley is the old man of mountain music now, and all the proper tributes are being paid. When Bill Monroe, the first patriarch of bluegrass music, died in 1997 at the age of 84, Stanley was left to carry on as a living link between today's tradition-minded folk music fans and the rural strains that began issuing from Appalachia on records by the Carter Family and others in the 1920s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2001 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Buena Vista Social Club wrote the book on how to package a bunch of reveredelders and bring them from a roots-music niche into the light of the mainstream. But now it looks as if there's a U.S. variation on that Cuban mission. The soundtrack album from the Coen brothers' film "O Brother, Where Art Thou?," a collection of vintage and newly recorded versions of traditional Southern songs, has claw-hammered its way to No.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1994 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sky was clear but the stars were nowhere in sight Monday night when seminal bluegrass musician Ralph Stanley played the Coach House. But even those in the house who only discovered Stanley last year via his star-studded "Saturday Night, Sunday Morning" album didn't appear to register any disappointment. Most likely that's because Stanley and his band played their old-time mountain music the way it's been played for most of his 41-year career: unadulterated.
NEWS
June 13, 2002
* Korn, "Untouchables," Epic/Immortal. The nu-metal pioneers take a more languid approach akin to the mechanical eroticism of Nine Inch Nails, the bleak harmonies of Alice in Chains and even the melodious musings of Staind.
NEWS
May 5, 1987
Ralph Stanley, head of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration and a critic of Los Angeles' Metro Rail subway project, announced he will leave the agency May 31. Stanley, 35, joined the agency in 1983 and quickly became one of its most controversial administrators. He criticized public transit spending as wasteful and sought to have those services turned over to private companies. Stanley is joining Municipal Development Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bluegrass giant Ralph Stanley has earned a lot of titles in his 54-year career. At his performance Monday at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Orange, he added to that list "the Timex watch of bluegrass." Recounting how he slipped on ice recently at his Virginia home and fell on the same wrist that underwent carpal-tunnel surgery three weeks ago, the 72-year-old musical workhorse proved he can indeed take a licking and keep on picking.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bluegrass giant Ralph Stanley has earned a lot of titles in his 54-year career. At his performance Monday at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Orange, he added to that list "the Timex watch of bluegrass." Recounting how he slipped on ice recently at his Virginia home and fell on the same wrist that underwent carpal-tunnel surgery three weeks ago, the 72-year-old musical workhorse proved he can indeed take a licking and keep on picking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2000 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're a country music fan, there's a good chance you've heard Jim Lauderdale's songs. Vince Gill, Patty Loveless, George Strait, the Dixie Chicks and George Jones are a few country notables who have recorded the North Carolina-native's tunes over the last nine years. Yet Jim Lauderdale the performer, who plays with bluegrass great Ralph Stanley & the Clinch Mountain Boys on Monday in Orange, isn't nearly as well-known as most of those who have sung his songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Stanley is the old man of mountain music now, and all the proper tributes are being paid. When Bill Monroe, the first patriarch of bluegrass music, died in 1997 at the age of 84, Stanley was left to carry on as a living link between today's tradition-minded folk music fans and the rural strains that began issuing from Appalachia on records by the Carter Family and others in the 1920s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM
Ralph Stanley's first Orange County concert since 1994 comes courtesy of the Southwest Bluegrass Assn., an organization of 2,000 musicians and fans in Southern California, Arizona and Nevada. "This is the very first concert ever for our association," said SBA President George Finney of Rialto. "We've got some new board members, some new blood and excitement, and we've been talking for some time about doing something like this." The show will take place in the sanctuary of St.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1998 | Randy Lewis
It's easy to understand why a sky full of country and folk stars--headed by Bob Dylan, Dwight Yoakam and Vince Gill--would want to pay tribute to bluegrass giant Ralph Stanley by joining him on this two-CD set of stone-traditional bluegrass, country and gospel nuggets. The attraction of songs expressing primal human desires, dreams, fears and sorrows is even stronger given contemporary country music's evasion of those themes in favor of warm and fuzzy feel-goodism.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1994 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sky was clear but the stars were nowhere in sight Monday night when seminal bluegrass musician Ralph Stanley played the Coach House. But even those in the house who only discovered Stanley last year via his star-studded "Saturday Night, Sunday Morning" album didn't appear to register any disappointment. Most likely that's because Stanley and his band played their old-time mountain music the way it's been played for most of his 41-year career: unadulterated.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM
Ralph Stanley's first Orange County concert since 1994 comes courtesy of the Southwest Bluegrass Assn., an organization of 2,000 musicians and fans in Southern California, Arizona and Nevada. "This is the very first concert ever for our association," said SBA President George Finney of Rialto. "We've got some new board members, some new blood and excitement, and we've been talking for some time about doing something like this." The show will take place in the sanctuary of St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2000 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're a country music fan, there's a good chance you've heard Jim Lauderdale's songs. Vince Gill, Patty Loveless, George Strait, the Dixie Chicks and George Jones are a few country notables who have recorded the North Carolina-native's tunes over the last nine years. Yet Jim Lauderdale the performer, who plays with bluegrass great Ralph Stanley & the Clinch Mountain Boys on Monday in Orange, isn't nearly as well-known as most of those who have sung his songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capturing a mass audience with a bluegrass song may be only slightly less difficult than getting a Hatfield to say something nice about a McCoy. But it is not impossible. Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs did it in 1962 with their TV theme from "The Beverly Hillbillies," and Eric Weissberg and Steve Mandell scored in 1972 with "Dueling Banjos," from the film "Deliverance." Ralph Stanley endorses those hits and says they helped recruit a new audience for what he calls "the old-time songs . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When he was growing up in Stratton, Va., Ralph Stanley had a choice: His aunt Roxie was selling a pig for $5, and a banjo for the same price. As much as young Ralph had a hankering to raise some hogs, he chose the banjo. More than a half-century has passed since then, during which time Stanley has become one of the certifiable legends of bluegrass music.
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