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Ralph Steadman

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Gina McIntyre
Tilda Swinton, Robert Duvall and groundbreaking visual artist Ralph Steadman will travel to Austin, Texas, next month for the South by Southwest Film Conference and Festival, organizers announced Wednesday. The trio, along with Jason Bateman and Mike Myers, will be on hand for special hourlong conversations centering on career highlights and new projects. “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” director Marc Webb also has joined the roster of SXSW keynote speakers, which includes Lena Dunham, Jason Blum and Casey Neistat.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Gina McIntyre
Tilda Swinton, Robert Duvall and groundbreaking visual artist Ralph Steadman will travel to Austin, Texas, next month for the South by Southwest Film Conference and Festival, organizers announced Wednesday. The trio, along with Jason Bateman and Mike Myers, will be on hand for special hourlong conversations centering on career highlights and new projects. “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” director Marc Webb also has joined the roster of SXSW keynote speakers, which includes Lena Dunham, Jason Blum and Casey Neistat.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The inventively shot and constructed documentary "For No Good Reason" is an absorbing look at the unique, surreal work of British cartoonist Ralph Steadman. Yet, the film, directed by 'Charlie Paul and narrated by - and also co-starring - Steadman's friend and admirer Johnny Depp, proves more successful at examining a lifetime's worth of an artist's output than at revealing much about the artist himself. Fortunately, Steadman's blotchy ink drawings are captivating; bold, weird, satirical and highly identifiable, often from their appearances in special editions of such classics as "Alice in Wonderland" and "Animal Farm," in Rolling Stone magazine and alongside the work of famed gonzo journalist and novelist Hunter S. Thompson.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The inventively shot and constructed documentary "For No Good Reason" is an absorbing look at the unique, surreal work of British cartoonist Ralph Steadman. Yet, the film, directed by 'Charlie Paul and narrated by - and also co-starring - Steadman's friend and admirer Johnny Depp, proves more successful at examining a lifetime's worth of an artist's output than at revealing much about the artist himself. Fortunately, Steadman's blotchy ink drawings are captivating; bold, weird, satirical and highly identifiable, often from their appearances in special editions of such classics as "Alice in Wonderland" and "Animal Farm," in Rolling Stone magazine and alongside the work of famed gonzo journalist and novelist Hunter S. Thompson.
BOOKS
November 4, 2007 | Karrie Higgins, Karrie Higgins is a writer based in Portland, Ore.
In 1950s and 1960s Paris, amid Le Corbusier-style modernism and urban renewal, the Situationist International attacked city planning as an ideology of organized social isolation, concerned primarily with the smooth flow of automobile traffic. Cities, the group charged, offered nothing more than capitalist spectacle -- "air-conditioned kindergartens" that educated people into prescribed patterns of movement and behavior. Liberation required a radical rethinking of cities and space.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Steadman draws lustily on a Scotch whiskey, washes it down with a Mexican beer and pricks up his ears. "Listen to this!" he says as a haunting new opera spills out of the Napa Valley cottage where he and his wife, Anna, are briefly burrowed. "This is the little child asking for his own life," he says, savoring the rich, vaguely South American score as a child's voice sings. " 'Can I have the life that's mine? Can I sing for you? Can I see the things you've seen? Can I live before I go?'
BOOKS
May 12, 1996
Regarding "Orwell Still Speaks" (April 7): For a George Orwell fan, what better Easter treat could have been given than the remarkable review of Ralph Steadman's new illustrated "Animal Farm"? Thanks to The Times and those incredibly bright students from Markham Middle School, led by teacher Yvonne Divans-Hutchinson. Who says there's no hope for the schools and that students can't read? They were reading one of the masters of English prose, let alone a political philosopher. Keep the Aspidistra Flying!
BOOKS
April 7, 1996 | Reviewed by Students at Markham Middle School in Los Angeles
Long before "Babe," pigs talked. Bank in 1945, Squealer and Snowball and Napoleon and the others spoke in a classic tale of tyranny and corrupted ambition. Someday, the author said, a suitable illustrator might emerge. Fifty years later, he has--in this memorable barnyard encounter between the powerful, fanciful imaginations of George Orwell and Ralph Steadman. We wondered what tomorrow's generation would think of the anniversary edition of "Animal Farn." **** "Animal Farm" deals with . .
BOOKS
March 16, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
Hunter S. Thompson is a real person trapped inside a legend that is largely, though not entirely, of his own making. When we think these days of the pioneer of gonzo journalism, the first image to come to mind is the Uncle Duke character in Garry Trudeau's "Doonesbury," who is Thompson with the bald head, the cigarette holder, the guns, drugs and love of bizarre intrigue, but without any of the seriousness and idealism. Idealism? What else can we call it when Thompson, who has savaged every U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
In his Doonesbury comic strip, Garry Trudeau has been paying tribute this week to Hunter S. Thompson, who was the inspiration for the character Uncle Duke. And now Rolling Stone magazine, where Thompson did some of his best writing, is joining the chorus with a 30-page spread on the journalist, who committed suicide on Feb. 20 at age 67.
BOOKS
November 4, 2007 | Karrie Higgins, Karrie Higgins is a writer based in Portland, Ore.
In 1950s and 1960s Paris, amid Le Corbusier-style modernism and urban renewal, the Situationist International attacked city planning as an ideology of organized social isolation, concerned primarily with the smooth flow of automobile traffic. Cities, the group charged, offered nothing more than capitalist spectacle -- "air-conditioned kindergartens" that educated people into prescribed patterns of movement and behavior. Liberation required a radical rethinking of cities and space.
BOOKS
March 16, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
Hunter S. Thompson is a real person trapped inside a legend that is largely, though not entirely, of his own making. When we think these days of the pioneer of gonzo journalism, the first image to come to mind is the Uncle Duke character in Garry Trudeau's "Doonesbury," who is Thompson with the bald head, the cigarette holder, the guns, drugs and love of bizarre intrigue, but without any of the seriousness and idealism. Idealism? What else can we call it when Thompson, who has savaged every U.S.
BOOKS
May 12, 1996
Regarding "Orwell Still Speaks" (April 7): For a George Orwell fan, what better Easter treat could have been given than the remarkable review of Ralph Steadman's new illustrated "Animal Farm"? Thanks to The Times and those incredibly bright students from Markham Middle School, led by teacher Yvonne Divans-Hutchinson. Who says there's no hope for the schools and that students can't read? They were reading one of the masters of English prose, let alone a political philosopher. Keep the Aspidistra Flying!
BOOKS
April 7, 1996 | Reviewed by Students at Markham Middle School in Los Angeles
Long before "Babe," pigs talked. Bank in 1945, Squealer and Snowball and Napoleon and the others spoke in a classic tale of tyranny and corrupted ambition. Someday, the author said, a suitable illustrator might emerge. Fifty years later, he has--in this memorable barnyard encounter between the powerful, fanciful imaginations of George Orwell and Ralph Steadman. We wondered what tomorrow's generation would think of the anniversary edition of "Animal Farn." **** "Animal Farm" deals with . .
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Steadman draws lustily on a Scotch whiskey, washes it down with a Mexican beer and pricks up his ears. "Listen to this!" he says as a haunting new opera spills out of the Napa Valley cottage where he and his wife, Anna, are briefly burrowed. "This is the little child asking for his own life," he says, savoring the rich, vaguely South American score as a child's voice sings. " 'Can I have the life that's mine? Can I sing for you? Can I see the things you've seen? Can I live before I go?'
NEWS
November 9, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE
What better way to spend Friday the 13th than with kooky illustrator Ralph Steadman? He will sign copies of his new book, "Gonzo: The Art" (Harcourt Brace), and speak about art, life, politics, wine, gardening and whatever else comes to mind at Every Picture Tells a Story's "Gonzo Party." Limited-edition silk screens of his work will be available for purchase. When Steadman joined with Hunter S.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
Add Ralph Steadman's grotesque illustrations to Hunter S. Thompson's Gonzo journalism, plus doses of Dali-esque Surrealism, Japanese comic books and classical Renaissance engraving, and you have a rough idea of Stuart Ellis' drawings. Working primarily in pastel and pen and ink, Ellis creates political and social satires using symbolic and metaphorical free association.
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