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Ralph Story

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2006 | J. Michael Kennedy, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Story, the veteran radio and television personality best known for his wry and witty observations about life in Los Angeles, died Tuesday at his home in Santa Ynez after a long battle with emphysema. He was 86. Story was the longtime host and narrator of "Ralph Story's Los Angeles," an Emmy-winning weekly magazine series that ran on KNXT-TV -- now KCBS-TV Channel 2 -- from 1964 to 1970. He was also a prolific producer, writer and lecturer on local and California history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2006 | Joseph Saltzman, Special to The Times
It is safe to say that television news will never see the likes of Ralph Story again. The veteran radio and television personality who died of emphysema at 86 on Tuesday in Santa Ynez could take any news story and turn it into a pithy comment on humankind, using all the tools usually associated with such print humorists as Mark Twain, S.J. Perelman or James Thurber.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2006 | Joseph Saltzman, Special to The Times
It is safe to say that television news will never see the likes of Ralph Story again. The veteran radio and television personality who died of emphysema at 86 on Tuesday in Santa Ynez could take any news story and turn it into a pithy comment on humankind, using all the tools usually associated with such print humorists as Mark Twain, S.J. Perelman or James Thurber.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2006 | J. Michael Kennedy, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Story, the veteran radio and television personality best known for his wry and witty observations about life in Los Angeles, died Tuesday at his home in Santa Ynez after a long battle with emphysema. He was 86. Story was the longtime host and narrator of "Ralph Story's Los Angeles," an Emmy-winning weekly magazine series that ran on KNXT-TV -- now KCBS-TV Channel 2 -- from 1964 to 1970. He was also a prolific producer, writer and lecturer on local and California history.
FOOD
September 8, 1994
I just finished reading this interesting article about the wonderful Mike Roy by his daughter, Robin Roy Gress, (Mike Roy, My Pop, Sept. 1), but I was stunned to see Ralph Story referred to as "the late . . . " Ralph, who lives in the Santa Ynez Valley with his lovely wife Diana, continues to be very active in community affairs--announcing parades and acting as master-of-ceremonies for local events. His humorous eloquence remains in great demand. --LYNNE NORRIS Los Olivos
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1985
Stan Chambers, who has been reporting for KTLA Channel 5 since 1947--the year the station began broadcasting--has been chosen to receive the 1985 Los Angeles Area Governors Emmy Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Chambers will receive the special Emmy at the academy's June 1 banquet to present the local Emmy Awards for 1985. The Governors Award is meant to honor individuals, shows or organizations that have made unique contributions to television in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1998
Roy Rowan, 78, a radio and television announcer who introduced all of the Lucille Ball shows. Born in Paw Paw, Mich., Rowan attended Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo and began his announcing career at radio station WKZO there, working with Ralph Story, Paul Harvey and Harry Carry. Rowan moved on to radio stations in Schenectady and Buffalo, N.Y., and Chicago before moving to Los Angeles to work for CBS Radio and later CBS Television.
NEWS
December 15, 1988
Richard H. Green of La Canada has been elected president of Pasadena City College Board of Trustees by members of the board. Green, who has been on the board 14 years, is a senior engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and is director of the Energy Institute at the University of La Verne. During his recently completed term as president of the California Community College Trustees he promoted Assembly Bill 1725, which was passed by the state Legislature this year.
NEWS
May 22, 1991
Nate Kaplan, often called the dean of Los Angeles broadcast writers and an instructor in the USC School of Journalism for 17 years, has died. He was 74. Kaplan, who won the Radio and Television News Directors Assn.'s first Golden Mike for newswriting in 1950, died Friday in La Costa of cancer. He wrote features and magazine shows for KNXT's Ralph Story and helped create the station's Big News, the country's first hourlong news broadcast that set a new pattern for news programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1994
What a pleasure to hear it told "like it is"! I'm referring to the insightful and enjoyable interview with George Putnam, ("I Broadcast in My Spare Time," July 21). I remember sitting (probably too close!) to our tiny Emerson TV and listening intently to the dulcet tones of newscasters such as Putnam and Baxter Ward. And now I really miss them. These guys were no-nonsense reporters . Putnam is so right when he decries the million-dollar anchors. Can they remember the copy they'd just read?
FOOD
September 8, 1994
I just finished reading this interesting article about the wonderful Mike Roy by his daughter, Robin Roy Gress, (Mike Roy, My Pop, Sept. 1), but I was stunned to see Ralph Story referred to as "the late . . . " Ralph, who lives in the Santa Ynez Valley with his lovely wife Diana, continues to be very active in community affairs--announcing parades and acting as master-of-ceremonies for local events. His humorous eloquence remains in great demand. --LYNNE NORRIS Los Olivos
MAGAZINE
November 5, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Rosenberg, a Pulitzer Prize winner, is the Times television critic.
IT WAS THE best and worst of times, the age of wisdom and folly, the epoch of "The $64,000 Question" and "The $64,000 Challenge." It was the season of "Twenty-One," the spring of "Tic Tac Dough," the winter of "Dotto." We had excited quizmasters before us, contestants in isolation booths and cash prizes reaching $264,000. We had crookedness before us. The television quiz scandals of the late 1950s were the most bizarre, disillusioning chapter in the history of broadcasting.
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