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Ralph Tresvant

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December 23, 1990 | CONNIE JOHNSON
As the last member of New Edition to record a solo project, Tresvant--always the group's resident heartthrob--must have felt a bellyfull of nerves when he decided to do this album. The results are respectable if a bit formulaic and unfocused, never really surpassing the monster he-man grooves of former groupmate Bobby Brown's solo smashes, and too laid back to wallop the misogyny-with-a-backbeat hits of Bell Biv DeVoe.
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January 6, 1991 | DENNIS HUNT, Dennis Hunt is a Times pop music writer.
It doesn't look like Ralph Tresvant will have to hang his head in shame after all. In the weeks before his new solo album was released, Tresvant--the latest member of the pop group New Edition to make his own record--said he'd be so embarrassed if the album wasn't a hit that he'd be ashamed to show his face. After all, the other five present or past members of New Edition have had hits away from the R&B vocal group.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
C'mon, Madonna, we're wise to you. You're saying that making the steamy video for "Justify My Love," which created a censorship furor, wasn't a publicity stunt? Not only did it become a hot-selling video single but also, more important for Madonna's bank account, it's spurring people to buy "The Immaculate Collection," her greatest hits package. "Justify My Love" is one of two new songs in this collection, which shot up to No. 5 on the Billboard magazine pop chart. But even a No.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1990 | CONNIE JOHNSON
As the last member of New Edition to record a solo project, Tresvant--always the group's resident heartthrob--must have felt a bellyfull of nerves when he decided to do this album. The results are respectable if a bit formulaic and unfocused, never really surpassing the monster he-man grooves of former groupmate Bobby Brown's solo smashes, and too laid back to wallop the misogyny-with-a-backbeat hits of Bell Biv DeVoe.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1991 | DENNIS HUNT, Dennis Hunt is a Times pop music writer.
It doesn't look like Ralph Tresvant will have to hang his head in shame after all. In the weeks before his new solo album was released, Tresvant--the latest member of the pop group New Edition to make his own record--said he'd be so embarrassed if the album wasn't a hit that he'd be ashamed to show his face. After all, the other five present or past members of New Edition have had hits away from the R&B vocal group.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
No Minors Allowed: The pop/R&B act Hi-Five was set to perform Sunday at Miami's Orange Bowl, but was bumped off a bill with LL Cool J, Ralph Tresvant, Bell Biv Devoe and Keith Sweat because the Hi-Five members are legally underage in Florida (the band's oldest member is 18). The concert's sponsor, Budweiser, asked to have the group dropped from the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1990 | CONNIE JOHNSON
This album by founding New Edition singers Ricky Bell, Michael Bivins and Ronald Devoe is worlds removed from their old kiddy fluff. Like former ally Bobby Brown, they have moved into hardcore hip-core territory, singing about such things as nymphets who linger backstage. In New Edition, the trio took a back seat to Brown and Ralph Tresvant. This album should put them in the driver's seat at last.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1986 | CONNIE JOHNSON
"ALL FOR LOVE." New Edition. MCA. Lead singer Ralph Tresvant, 17, continues to emerge as black music's major teen heartthrob. His voice is still pinched and whiny, but those tortured tones are the key to this vocal quintet's charm. Overall, the album shows a mastery of teen-age titillation, with "Count Me Out" as the main attraction. That cut matches last year's "Cool It Now," with its easy, perky appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Bobby Brown, who left New Edition in the 1980s for a solo career, reunited with the band Sunday night for two songs at the Essence Music Festival in Houston. As the other five members moved to slick choreography, Brown ran around the stage wildly and performed raunchy dance moves. Brown then left the stage, and the remainder of the group -- original members Ralph Tresvant, Ricky Bell, Michael Bivins and Ronnie DeVoe, plus Johnny Gill, who replaced Brown -- performed several ballads.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
C'mon, Madonna, we're wise to you. You're saying that making the steamy video for "Justify My Love," which created a censorship furor, wasn't a publicity stunt? Not only did it become a hot-selling video single but also, more important for Madonna's bank account, it's spurring people to buy "The Immaculate Collection," her greatest hits package. "Justify My Love" is one of two new songs in this collection, which shot up to No. 5 on the Billboard magazine pop chart. But even a No.
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