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BUSINESS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristena Hansen, Los Angeles Times
Times reporters Ken Bensinger and Ralph Vartabedian won the 2010 Gerald Loeb Award in the beat reporting category for their series of articles on Toyota Motor Corp.'s vehicle safety problems. The Loebs, which are the most prestigious award in business journalism, were announced Tuesday night in New York. In presenting the prize to The Times reporters, the judges said, "This series of reports revealed how Toyota and federal regulators have ignored or misclassified complaints of sudden acceleration by drivers of late-model Toyotas."
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NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Let's face facts: California just doesn't do trains very well. Now, freeways -- those we're good at. We've got the car culture thing down pat. Getting most places by freeway is a snap: Why, from Pasadena to the beach, you just take the 110 to the 105 to the 405 to the 1. Although you could just take the 110 to the 10 to the 1, or, if you're inclined, the 2 to the 134 to the 101 to the 1. (Oh, but watch out for SigAlerts, Caltrans construction and...
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NEWS
February 25, 1999
For more features available only on the Web, point your browser to http://www.latimes.com/highway1. This month's offerings: * MR. OUTSIDE: Barry Meguiar--owner of the eponymous company that makes appearance goodies used by major collectors and museums--offers his tips on caring for your car's exterior. * CARE PACKAGE: A selection of past Do It Yourself columns. Plus: Ralph Vartabedian on five repairs you can safely delay. * YOUR MECHANICS: Readers nominate their favorite mechanics.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristena Hansen, Los Angeles Times
Times reporters Ken Bensinger and Ralph Vartabedian won the 2010 Gerald Loeb Award in the beat reporting category for their series of articles on Toyota Motor Corp.'s vehicle safety problems. The Loebs, which are the most prestigious award in business journalism, were announced Tuesday night in New York. In presenting the prize to The Times reporters, the judges said, "This series of reports revealed how Toyota and federal regulators have ignored or misclassified complaints of sudden acceleration by drivers of late-model Toyotas."
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Let's face facts: California just doesn't do trains very well. Now, freeways -- those we're good at. We've got the car culture thing down pat. Getting most places by freeway is a snap: Why, from Pasadena to the beach, you just take the 110 to the 105 to the 405 to the 1. Although you could just take the 110 to the 10 to the 1, or, if you're inclined, the 2 to the 134 to the 101 to the 1. (Oh, but watch out for SigAlerts, Caltrans construction and...
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
You may wash and wax your car. You can vacuum the dirt off your bucket seats. If you are really fastidious, you might even use a degreaser to clean under your hood. But what about engine sludge, that black tar that coats the inside of your cylinder block and shortens the life of your engine? Like fat cells blocking arteries, sludge can impede the lubrication system in your engine. Is it worth fretting over?
AUTOS
May 12, 2004 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
A good set of tires has always made a big difference in safety, fuel economy and handling, but one area that is getting new attention is the quality of tires to reduce or increase the amount of noise a vehicle makes. Tire manufacturers are racing to develop tires that reduce noise, aiming to meet tough new standards mandated by European and Asian nations that want to reduce noise pollution. Though U.S.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ever hear an automotive battery explode, you will gain a newfound respect for the raw power packed into these heavy lead-acid devices under your hood. It's nearly as loud as a gunshot, as the plastic case blows apart--followed by the sound of toxic, highly concentrated sulfuric acid bubbling to the ground. The risk of explosion is labeled on every automotive battery, though few motorists bother to read such warnings, let alone take them seriously.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1989 | RALPH VARTEBIAN
Malcolm R. Currie, chairman of Hughes Aircraft Co. "The thing that has caught everybody by surprise is the rush of these events, the pace of these events. We in this country often overreact to events when they happen. We have that national characteristic. I think President Bush is doing a good job of not overreacting, handling these things in stride in a very prudent way. "What other instabilities will exist in the world or what instabilities these events will give rise to, nobody knows.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: My 1989 Mustang's four-cylinder engine recently began knocking. My mechanic said I'm ready to throw a rod. With 140,000 miles on the car, I'm not willing to put much money into it. What are my options? --R.S. Answer: It's a bleak picture, since a bad piston rod usually means the engine will have to be pulled out of the car, torn apart, and fully rebuilt or a remanufactured engine installed.
NEWS
February 25, 1999
For more features available only on the Web, point your browser to http://www.latimes.com/highway1. This month's offerings: * MR. OUTSIDE: Barry Meguiar--owner of the eponymous company that makes appearance goodies used by major collectors and museums--offers his tips on caring for your car's exterior. * CARE PACKAGE: A selection of past Do It Yourself columns. Plus: Ralph Vartabedian on five repairs you can safely delay. * YOUR MECHANICS: Readers nominate their favorite mechanics.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
You may wash and wax your car. You can vacuum the dirt off your bucket seats. If you are really fastidious, you might even use a degreaser to clean under your hood. But what about engine sludge, that black tar that coats the inside of your cylinder block and shortens the life of your engine? Like fat cells blocking arteries, sludge can impede the lubrication system in your engine. Is it worth fretting over?
BUSINESS
December 24, 1989 | RALPH VARTEBIAN
Malcolm R. Currie, chairman of Hughes Aircraft Co. "The thing that has caught everybody by surprise is the rush of these events, the pace of these events. We in this country often overreact to events when they happen. We have that national characteristic. I think President Bush is doing a good job of not overreacting, handling these things in stride in a very prudent way. "What other instabilities will exist in the world or what instabilities these events will give rise to, nobody knows.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2008 | Stephanie Simon, Ralph Vartabedian and P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writers
A gunman, dressed all in black, stepped on stage in a lecture hall at Northern Illinois University on Thursday and opened fire on a geology class. A short time later, five students were dead and the gunman had killed himself on the lecture hall stage. Sixteen others were wounded, at least two of them critically. It was the fifth school shooting in a week in the U.S. The violence at Northern Illinois unfolded about 3 p.m., as the entry-level ocean sciences class was wrapping up.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2009 | Ralph Vartabedian
A sea of ancient water tainted by the Cold War is creeping deep under the volcanic peaks, dry lake beds and pinyon pine forests covering a vast tract of Nevada. Over 41 years, the federal government detonated 921 nuclear warheads underground at the Nevada Test Site, 75 miles northeast of Las Vegas. Each explosion deposited a toxic load of radioactivity into the ground and, in some cases, directly into aquifers. When testing ended in 1992, the Energy Department estimated that more than 300 million curies of radiation had been left behind, making the site one of the most radioactively contaminated places in the nation.
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