Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRalph Vartabedian
IN THE NEWS

Ralph Vartabedian

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NATIONAL
August 25, 2012 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Richard A. Serrano and Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
John "Sly" Sylvester, a radio commentator and Democratic operative in Madison, Wis., was dining at a Mexican restaurant in Washington with then-Wisconsin Sen. Russ Feingold about 20 years ago when a young Paul Ryan walked up. "He was our waiter," Sylvester said. Feingold knew Ryan's late father and, as they chatted, Ryan "said he even used to listen to my show when he was a kid," Sylvester recalled. Examples like that have helped Ryan, soon-to-be the GOP's vice presidential nominee, burnish his credentials as a youthful working-class guy. "I don't know about you, but when I was growing up, when I was flipping burgers at McDonald's, when I was standing in front of that big Hobart machine washing dishes, or waiting tables, I never thought of myself as stuck in some station in life," Ryan recently told a crowd at a high school in suburban Denver.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: My 1989 Mustang's four-cylinder engine recently began knocking. My mechanic said I'm ready to throw a rod. With 140,000 miles on the car, I'm not willing to put much money into it. What are my options? --R.S. Answer: It's a bleak picture, since a bad piston rod usually means the engine will have to be pulled out of the car, torn apart, and fully rebuilt or a remanufactured engine installed.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ever hear an automotive battery explode, you will gain a newfound respect for the raw power packed into these heavy lead-acid devices under your hood. It's nearly as loud as a gunshot, as the plastic case blows apart--followed by the sound of toxic, highly concentrated sulfuric acid bubbling to the ground. The risk of explosion is labeled on every automotive battery, though few motorists bother to read such warnings, let alone take them seriously.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1991
Editor: Linda Darnell Williams News Editor: Steven Seiler Artist: Michael Hall Reporters: Jane Applegate Bob Baker James Bates Michael Cieply Alan Citron Bob Dallos Tom Furlong James S. Granelli Amy Harmon Bruce Horovitz Kathy M. Kristof Marie L. La Ganga Carla Lazzareschi Patrick Lee Robert Rosenblatt Stuart Silverstein Ralph Vartabedian George White
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conventional wisdom about broken glass and other kinds of hazards encountered on the road abounds. The sight of smashed glass on the highway prompts most motorists to swerve to avoid damaging their tires. Potholes are generally viewed as obstacles, sort of a test of one's driving skills. Rubbing a tire against the curb is considered unfortunately clumsy, but nothing to worry about. Such thinking is correct in some cases and entirely wrong in others.
AUTOS
May 17, 2006 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to auto safety, the most basic and seemingly simple issues are sometimes the least understood. The auto industry invests billions of dollars each year in technology to make cars safer. Laws are passed by legislators every year with the intent to make roads safer. And experts debate endlessly about whether teens or older people should be denied some or all driving privileges. But all this ignores some rudimentary matters, such as which foot you brake with.
NEWS
November 1, 2000 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is the fuel-injection cleaning sold by many independent garages and dealerships a sound investment in your vehicle, or a marginally beneficial service pushed on consumers to fatten profits? Fuel-injection service is part of a bigger trend in automotive maintenance that includes such procedures as flushes for crankcases, power-steering pumps and cooling systems, as well as for differentials and other lubricated parts.
NEWS
February 6, 1998 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: I have a squeak in my car's front end that is driving me crazy. It occurs whenever I turn the steering wheel--but it disappears when it rains. I have had the steering and suspension checked out, and the mechanic could not find loose parts. He said the squeak is coming from a rubber bushing. Is there a way to lubricate this thing? --J.M. Answer: You can lubricate a squeaky bushing, but you need to be careful about the lubricant you use.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|