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Ramaa Bharadvaj

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November 18, 2002 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
In "Sarpagati: Dances of the Rising Serpent," Ramaa Bharadvaj enlisted her considerable talents as a classical Indian dancer and choreographer to illuminate profound concepts in Hindu philosophy. Presented Friday at the Norton Simon Museum, the six-part program offered vibrant, artful performances attempting to fuse images from sculptures in the museum's collection with ideas from a text read with care and grace by Nimmi Raghunathan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2002 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
In "Sarpagati: Dances of the Rising Serpent," Ramaa Bharadvaj enlisted her considerable talents as a classical Indian dancer and choreographer to illuminate profound concepts in Hindu philosophy. Presented Friday at the Norton Simon Museum, the six-part program offered vibrant, artful performances attempting to fuse images from sculptures in the museum's collection with ideas from a text read with care and grace by Nimmi Raghunathan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES
In a six-part "Rhythms of the World" program ranging from Appalachia to Spain on Saturday at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre, one artist in particular brought world-class status to the final Dance Kaleidoscope program. Liam Harney easily, joyfully showed why he was twice declared a world champion Irish step dancer, bounding in effortless flight, tapping out speedy and intricate rhythms, accenting beats with clicks of his heels in the air as well as on the floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2002 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lord Krishna's birthday, on Aug. 30, is a date that might not be marked on every Southland calendar, but when Ramaa Bharadvaj starts dancing about it, it becomes a celebration that even the uninitiated can enjoy. In "Yatra--A Journey to India," a program shared with singer Mala Ganguly and the Ragamala Music Ensemble at California Plaza on Sunday night, Bharadvaj's own Angahara Ensemble whipped up an atmosphere that was as festive as it was aesthetically crystalline.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
Dance in India is deeply connected to religious devotion, but dancer Ramaa Bharadvaj believes that Western students can pick up some of the technique without converting to Hinduism. So she is teaching a summer course in Bharata Natyam, one of the classical dance idioms of southern India, at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa, beginning Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
Two years ago, when Ramaa Bharadvaj turned 40, she had an epiphany. No longer would she conform to traditional notions of how an Indian wife and mother should behave. Nor would she confine herself to age-old ritual and mythological themes when choreographing the classical Indian dance she had performed since the age of 3. "My 40th year was a tornado," recalls Bharadvaj, sporting a cranberry-and-gold chiffon sari and a stick-on bindi, representing the "third eye of wisdom," on her forehead.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2002 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lord Krishna's birthday, on Aug. 30, is a date that might not be marked on every Southland calendar, but when Ramaa Bharadvaj starts dancing about it, it becomes a celebration that even the uninitiated can enjoy. In "Yatra--A Journey to India," a program shared with singer Mala Ganguly and the Ragamala Music Ensemble at California Plaza on Sunday night, Bharadvaj's own Angahara Ensemble whipped up an atmosphere that was as festive as it was aesthetically crystalline.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 11th annual Lester Horton Dance Awards honored a wide range of styles and companies at ceremonies Sunday at the Japan America Theatre. Presented by the Dance Resource Center of Greater Los Angeles and named after a locally based modern dance pioneer, this edition of the awards was hosted by choreographer-impresario Deborah Brockus and dance company administrator Erwin Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf
Commercial director Randy Roberts likens his latest work to a wedding cake. Viewers might think it's a DeMille-like human pyramid. Roberts' creation, an ad for radio station KCRW-FM currently playing at independent movie theaters, features an elephant, a grand piano and 150 dancers, musicians and circus performers of diverse ethnic backgrounds tapped to represent Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
Two years ago, when Ramaa Bharadvaj turned 40, she had an epiphany. No longer would she conform to traditional notions of how an Indian wife and mother should behave. Nor would she confine herself to age-old ritual and mythological themes when choreographing the classical Indian dance she had performed since the age of 3. "My 40th year was a tornado," recalls Bharadvaj, sporting a cranberry-and-gold chiffon sari and a stick-on bindi, representing the "third eye of wisdom," on her forehead.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES
In a six-part "Rhythms of the World" program ranging from Appalachia to Spain on Saturday at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre, one artist in particular brought world-class status to the final Dance Kaleidoscope program. Liam Harney easily, joyfully showed why he was twice declared a world champion Irish step dancer, bounding in effortless flight, tapping out speedy and intricate rhythms, accenting beats with clicks of his heels in the air as well as on the floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
Dance in India is deeply connected to religious devotion, but dancer Ramaa Bharadvaj believes that Western students can pick up some of the technique without converting to Hinduism. So she is teaching a summer course in Bharata Natyam, one of the classical dance idioms of southern India, at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa, beginning Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2003 | Don Shirley
The California Arts Council may soon receive a little unexpected funding in the form of individual dollar bills mailed to Sacramento, with the names of the senders written in red ink on the currency. The suggested donations would be part of a protest against Gov. Gray Davis' proposed cuts in the council's budget. Grappling with the state's fiscal crisis, he has suggested trimming that budget from $22.4 million to $8.4 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2003 | Mike Boehm
Eleven Californians who "have fought long and hard to protect and advance the arts" will receive awards in January from the California Arts Coun- cil.
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