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Ramadan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1991
Ramadan, which began this morning for Muslims, is the holiest period on the Islamic calendar. It calls for daytime fasting for 29 days. Traditionally, followers of Islam wait for the first sighting of the crescent moon to declare the start of Ramadan, but many major mosques in Southern California now declare the start according to calculations of the phases of the moon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
July 24, 2013 | Sarah Hashim-Waris
We're about halfway through the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. This is the time of year when an estimated 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide abstain from eating, drinking, smoking and sex during daylight hours. That's right -- we give up food, water, coffee and even cronuts from sunup to sundown to commemorate God's revelation of Islam's holy book, the Koran, to the Prophet Muhammad. Instead of spending afternoons with friends at Starbucks, Muslims focus on achieving self-discipline and reflection, while feeling the plight of those less fortunate.
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WORLD
July 10, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
CAIRO -- A muggy sunrise over Cairo on Wednesday ushered in the start of Egypt's annual Ramadan season, when Muslims begin a monthlong period of fasting and religious reflection. The question many here are asking: Will the revolution take time off for the holiday? The military, which last week brought down Islamist President Mohamed Morsi, certainly hopes so. The military-led interim government is betting that Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood supporters will find it harder to sustain their protests demanding his reinstatement while simultaneously refraining from food, water and cigarettes from dawn to dusk.
WORLD
July 13, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Weak from lack of food and worn down by months of harassment, the 100-plus hunger strikers at the Guantanamo Bay prison complex in southern Cuba scored symbolic court victories this week as their nearly 5-month-old protest against indefinite detention stretched into the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Military jailers at the U.S. Navy base have been force-feeding 45 detainees whose refusal of food - most since February - has taken its toll on their health and attitude toward compliance with the rules of detention.
FOOD
October 17, 2007
I was so disappointed when I saw no mention of Eid al-Fitr, [the] huge Muslim holiday. The Food section also ignored Ramadan, a holiday totally revolving around food. With the reach of Islam, almost any cuisine of the world could have been highlighted. Shaila Andrabi Claremont
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2009 | Raja Abdulrahim
In June, the calls to Dennis Jensen's Riverside County date farm began to pick up. By July, he said, the calls took on a more urgent nature: "Send me some dates; save me!" Wholesalers and grocers were rushing to put their orders in for Ramadan, the Muslim holy month that begins Saturday. During Ramadan, Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset, followed by evening meals that commence with at least one date, a practice believed followed by the prophet Muhammad. Preferences for the fleshy fruit run from the drier deglet noor to the sweet Medina to the hard, yellow barhi . But the most sought-after dates -- especially among Middle Easterners -- are the soft, plump medjool . Nearly all medjools in the United States come from the Coachella or Imperial valleys in Southern California.
WORLD
August 11, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Chickens huddle in crates near the butcher's block. A shopkeeper stacks mangoes, his hands sticky, drawing flies. Laborers linger in thinning shade and mothers tilt toward home with groceries. A thirst rises. It will be hours before it's quenched. Even the ice man, bent and dripping, hurrying through Koran verses spinning from an old radio, does not allow water to pass his lips. He waits - like everyone else in this listless street market off the Nile - for the heat to ease and the shadows to lengthen.
WORLD
July 11, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels
TEHRAN -- In these first days of Ramadan, many Iranians hoped to hear a familiar and beloved voice as they tuned into state radio or switched on TV just before iftar, the evening meal that signals the end of the dawn-to-dusk fast. They were looking forward to the soothing melodies of Mohammad Reza Shajarian, among the most acclaimed vocalists of traditional Persian songs, reciting his celebrated version of  the “Rabbana” (Our Lord) Islamic prayer, a longtime tradition that came to an abrupt halt four years ago.  [ A version has been posted on YouTube]
WORLD
July 13, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Weak from lack of food and worn down by months of harassment, the 100-plus hunger strikers at the Guantanamo Bay prison complex in southern Cuba scored symbolic court victories this week as their nearly 5-month-old protest against indefinite detention stretched into the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Military jailers at the U.S. Navy base have been force-feeding 45 detainees whose refusal of food - most since February - has taken its toll on their health and attitude toward compliance with the rules of detention.
NEWS
February 16, 1993
With the sighting of the first sliver of a new moon over the holy city of Mecca, expected Feb. 22 in the United States, the world's 1 billion Muslims mark the beginning of the month of Ramadan, a 30-day period of strict fasting and religious celebration that constitutes one of the five pillars of the Islamic faith. The observant refrain from eating, drinking and smoking between sunrise and sunset. Children begin fasting gradually until old enough to do so without injuring their health.
WORLD
July 11, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels
TEHRAN -- In these first days of Ramadan, many Iranians hoped to hear a familiar and beloved voice as they tuned into state radio or switched on TV just before iftar, the evening meal that signals the end of the dawn-to-dusk fast. They were looking forward to the soothing melodies of Mohammad Reza Shajarian, among the most acclaimed vocalists of traditional Persian songs, reciting his celebrated version of  the “Rabbana” (Our Lord) Islamic prayer, a longtime tradition that came to an abrupt halt four years ago.  [ A version has been posted on YouTube]
WORLD
July 10, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
As the Muslim holy month of Ramadan began Wednesday in Syria, civilians in parts of Aleppo, Homs and the Damascus suburbs remained cut off from food and aid supplies as government and rebel forces tried to besiege each other into submission. Ahmad Jarba, the newly elected president of the opposition Syrian National Coalition, this week suggested a cease-fire for the fasting month, but nothing came of the offer. Government forces bombarded several opposition-held neighborhoods in Homs, including hard-hit Khaldiyeh and Bab Houd, meeting resistance from rebels, according to the London-based pro-opposition group Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.
WORLD
July 10, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
CAIRO -- A muggy sunrise over Cairo on Wednesday ushered in the start of Egypt's annual Ramadan season, when Muslims begin a monthlong period of fasting and religious reflection. The question many here are asking: Will the revolution take time off for the holiday? The military, which last week brought down Islamist President Mohamed Morsi, certainly hopes so. The military-led interim government is betting that Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood supporters will find it harder to sustain their protests demanding his reinstatement while simultaneously refraining from food, water and cigarettes from dawn to dusk.
WORLD
July 10, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
CAIRO - They called it Egypt's largest-ever iftar table. Tens of thousands of supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohamed Morsi sat on a patchwork of blue tarps and carpets Wednesday evening, stretching block after block for nearly half a mile on the streets of Cairo's Rabaa district. After they fasted throughout the day in a sweltering tent encampment, anticipation built as dusk approached on Egypt's first day of Ramadan and crowds prepared to share iftar , the traditional evening meal when Muslims break their daily fast.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
There's a place in Abu Dhabi where now you can order up milkshakes made with camel milk, locally sourced, of course, in strawberry, chocolate, date, banana or mint flavors. Or an iced camel milk latte. Mohammad Daoud proudly claims the title "camel milk mixologist" at the newly opened Ritz-Carlton Abu-Dhabi, Grand Canal. The shake-it-up wizard says he came up with the idea of muddling ingredients for his smoothie-like creations that cost about $6 each as a special Ramadan treat.
WORLD
August 20, 2012 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
BEIRUT - In the Syrian town of Talbiseh on Sunday, residents heralded the end of the Muslim month of Ramadan on a tank, chanting anti-government slogans. Young children played on swings hanging from the tank's turret. Across the country, Syrians shared a somber Eid al-Fitr holiday as bloodshed continued. Activists reported more than 150 people killed, a death toll that has become the new normal as the conflict has reached every part of the country. "What Eid? There is no Eid today," said Abu Sufyan, with the Aleppo Military Council, which is coordinating the rebel offensive.
WORLD
August 11, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Chickens huddle in crates near the butcher's block. A shopkeeper stacks mangoes, his hands sticky, drawing flies. Laborers linger in thinning shade and mothers tilt toward home with groceries. A thirst rises. It will be hours before it's quenched. Even the ice man, bent and dripping, hurrying through Koran verses spinning from an old radio, does not allow water to pass his lips. He waits - like everyone else in this listless street market off the Nile - for the heat to ease and the shadows to lengthen.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
Muslims in central Tennessee moved into their newly built mosque Friday with a week left to go in the holy month of Ramadan, capping a multi-year struggle that included vandalism, threats and lawsuits from local residents. A temporary occupancy permit issued Tuesday put a stay - for the time being - to a legal dispute that began in 2010 . That's when the Islamic community broke ground on a 12,000-square-foot mosque, and local residents sued.   Moving in was a milestone for the Islamic community, but the day was tinged with worry over religious freedom, according to the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.
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