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Ramallah Israel

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WORLD
January 5, 2007 | Richard Boudreaux and Maher Abukhater, Special to The Times
Israeli troops staged a rare incursion into this city Thursday, bulldozing cars and vegetable stands near the central square as they engaged gunmen and stone-throwing residents in a chaotic two-hour battle that left four Palestinians dead.
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WORLD
January 5, 2007 | Richard Boudreaux and Maher Abukhater, Special to The Times
Israeli troops staged a rare incursion into this city Thursday, bulldozing cars and vegetable stands near the central square as they engaged gunmen and stone-throwing residents in a chaotic two-hour battle that left four Palestinians dead.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2006 | From Reuters
For once, the cacophony in Ramallah was not over an Israeli army raid or infighting between militant factions. It came, instead, from the first Oscar party held by Palestinians elated at a kinsman's nomination for Hollywood's top honor. In the end, "Paradise Now," a controversial drama about two Palestinians recruited to carry out suicide bombings in Israel, did not capture the Oscar for best foreign-language film.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2006 | From Reuters
For once, the cacophony in Ramallah was not over an Israeli army raid or infighting between militant factions. It came, instead, from the first Oscar party held by Palestinians elated at a kinsman's nomination for Hollywood's top honor. In the end, "Paradise Now," a controversial drama about two Palestinians recruited to carry out suicide bombings in Israel, did not capture the Oscar for best foreign-language film.
WORLD
September 21, 2002 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using dynamite and bulldozers, Israeli forces on Friday flattened much of what remained of Yasser Arafat's headquarters and left the Palestinian leader trapped on a single floor of his office building, which was raked with machine-gun fire and struck by at least one tank shell. The assault, which continued into this morning, was intended to physically and politically isolate the Palestinian Authority president after two suicide attacks on Israelis this week.
NEWS
April 3, 2002 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bodies were stacking up in the morgue. During the five days of Israel's stifling siege of Ramallah, it had been impossible to bury a body. The siege, imposed by Israel as part of what it calls its war on terrorism, has trapped people in their homes, kept children out of school and blocked access to basic services such as medical care. But a brief respite came Tuesday afternoon when Israel lifted restrictions and Palestinians were allowed to emerge into the daylight for a couple of hours.
WORLD
June 26, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Bowing to pressure from Washington, Israel granted U.S.-trained Palestinian security forces greater autonomy in four major West Bank cities, Israeli and Palestinian defense officials said. Israeli officials said the army would reduce its presence in Kalkilya, Bethlehem, Jericho and Ramallah. Israel will ease its requirement that Palestinian security forces in these towns coordinate their movements closely with the Israeli military. This will allow the Palestinians to decide where to deploy and where they should be armed and uniformed, an Israeli official said.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
Issuing a report on Israeli-Palestinian fighting, a commission led by former U.S. Sen. George J. Mitchell of Maine said Friday that Israel should freeze settlement construction, but it did not recommend sending an international force to the region. Diplomatic sources in Washington said the panel blamed neither Israelis nor Palestinians directly for igniting confrontations more than seven months ago. One section of the document called for a complete freeze on Jewish settlement construction.
WORLD
May 13, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat left Ramallah today for the first time since Israel confined him to the city six months ago. At the helipad in his headquarters, Arafat climbed into a Jordanian air force helicopter that was to fly him to three of the hardest-hit areas in Israel's six-week West Bank military offensive: Bethlehem, the battle-scarred Jenin refugee camp and the city of Nablus.
NEWS
April 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Shouting for revenge against Israel, thousands of Palestinian demonstrators in the West Bank and Gaza Strip vented their rage Friday over the death of a Muslim militant bomb maker. "Dear Qassam, blow up Tel Aviv," crowds chanted, urging the military wing of the Hamas group to avenge Mohiedin Sharif's death.
WORLD
September 21, 2002 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using dynamite and bulldozers, Israeli forces on Friday flattened much of what remained of Yasser Arafat's headquarters and left the Palestinian leader trapped on a single floor of his office building, which was raked with machine-gun fire and struck by at least one tank shell. The assault, which continued into this morning, was intended to physically and politically isolate the Palestinian Authority president after two suicide attacks on Israelis this week.
NEWS
April 3, 2002 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bodies were stacking up in the morgue. During the five days of Israel's stifling siege of Ramallah, it had been impossible to bury a body. The siege, imposed by Israel as part of what it calls its war on terrorism, has trapped people in their homes, kept children out of school and blocked access to basic services such as medical care. But a brief respite came Tuesday afternoon when Israel lifted restrictions and Palestinians were allowed to emerge into the daylight for a couple of hours.
NEWS
January 4, 2002 | From Associated Press
With Mideast violence at its lowest level in 15 months, U.S. envoy Anthony C. Zinni returned Thursday hoping to prod Israelis and Palestinians into moving ahead with a truce plan both sides accepted in principle last year. Israel pulled back tanks and troops Thursday from half a dozen Palestinian towns in the West Bank, a move long sought by Palestinians who have had their movements sharply curtailed.
WORLD
December 3, 2013 | By Maher Abukhater
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Leaks from test results French scientists had conducted on samples taken last year from the remains of the late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat added more confusion Tuesday to the debate over Arafat's death. According to the leaks, widely published by news agencies, the French results did not confirm that Arafat died from poison and suggested that he probably died of natural causes. "The report rules out the poisoning theory," Agence France-Presse quoted an unidentified source as saying.
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