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WORLD
March 14, 2010 | By Paul Richter
Beginning as a spat over a single housing project, a dispute this week between the Obama administration and Israel has ballooned into the biggest U.S.-Israeli clash in 20 years, adding to months of strain between Washington and one of its closest allies. Israel's decision to move ahead with 1,600 new housing units in East Jerusalem, announced during a visit by Vice President Joe Biden, drew criticism from Washington in language rarely directed at even Iran or North Korea. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Israel's announcement "was an insult to the United States."
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WORLD
October 31, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Israel has announced that it is advancing plans to build settlements in the West Bank and Jerusalem amid sharp international criticism that the projects will hurt the peace process with the Palestinians. Hours after releasing a group of Palestinian prisoners Tuesday night, Israel announced the renewal of several developments in the Jerusalem area on lands annexed after the 1967 war, which Palestinians claim for a future state. A number of the projects announced are not new, such as the expansion of the northeast Jewish neighborhood of Ramat Shlomo by 1,500 units.
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WORLD
December 19, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Defying a wave of international condemnation, Israel on Wednesday gave final approval to a 2,610-unit housing project in a southern Jerusalem area that Palestinians claim should be part of their future state. The project, called Givat Hamatos, is the first entirely new development approved in 15 years in the Jerusalem area on land Israel seized during the 1967 Middle East War. City officials said the project -- which could begin construction in a year -- is needed to ease the rising cost of housing.
WORLD
December 25, 2012 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM - - The Jerusalem district planning committee has granted approval to build another 1,200 housing units in Gilo, expanding the Jewish neighborhood built on Jerusalem-area land seized by Israel in 1967. It was the latest in a series of similar development decisions that have followed the United Nations vote in November granting the Palestinian Authority its request for non-member observer state status. Planning committee member Moshe Montag told Israel Radio on Tuesday that the plan had been submitted more than a year ago but that procedures had been blocked for diplomatic reasons -- until now. “Unfortunately, it takes a drama, terror attack or U.N. vote to release construction in Jerusalem, our capital, and this is absurd,” Montag said.
WORLD
December 17, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Israel gave a green light Monday to 1,500 new units of Jewish housing in the Ramat Shlomo development in the northern Jerusalem area, an expansion that had triggered a diplomatic rift with the U.S. after it was first announced during a 2010 visit to Israel by Vice President Joe Biden. The project, located on land Israel seized during the 1967 Middle East war, had been largely dormant after the Obama administration complained that the timing of the announcement during Biden's trip was an “insult.” The U.S. opposes Israeli settlement on land beyond the 1967 Green Line, considering it an obstacle to peace talks.
WORLD
March 12, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders
Reporting from Jerusalem — You come for a hug. You leave with a slap. It happens in the Middle East. Vice President Joe Biden's trip this week was supposed to highlight U.S.-Israeli cooperation to counter a perceived nuclear threat from Iran and kick off U.S.-brokered indirect peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians. Instead, talk about Iran was sidetracked and the outlook for peace may be murkier than it was before. Even here, people are not quite sure how that happened.
WORLD
March 11, 2010 | By Paul Richter
Vice President Joe Biden, winding up a disconcerting trip to the Middle East, struggled Thursday to keep hopes alive for new peace talks amid Palestinian anger over Israeli plans for new housing construction in a disputed Jerusalem neighborhood. Despite earlier pledges to take part in talks scheduled to begin next week, Palestinian officials threatened to stay away unless Israel abandons announced plans for a 1,600-unit project in East Jerusalem. Palestinians pressed for the United States to persuade Israel to change its stance on the project.
WORLD
October 16, 2010 | Edmund Sanders
Defying U.S. and international calls to restrain home-building on disputed land, Israel said Friday it would construct 238 more homes atop territory in East Jerusalem seized during the 1967 Middle East War. The decision threw U.S.-sponsored peace talks into further doubt and ended a de facto construction freeze in East Jerusalem that had been quietly observed, though never formally declared, since March. Palestinian officials accused Israel of trying to sabotage American efforts to salvage direct peace talks.
WORLD
December 25, 2012 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM - - The Jerusalem district planning committee has granted approval to build another 1,200 housing units in Gilo, expanding the Jewish neighborhood built on Jerusalem-area land seized by Israel in 1967. It was the latest in a series of similar development decisions that have followed the United Nations vote in November granting the Palestinian Authority its request for non-member observer state status. Planning committee member Moshe Montag told Israel Radio on Tuesday that the plan had been submitted more than a year ago but that procedures had been blocked for diplomatic reasons -- until now. “Unfortunately, it takes a drama, terror attack or U.N. vote to release construction in Jerusalem, our capital, and this is absurd,” Montag said.
WORLD
October 31, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Israel has announced that it is advancing plans to build settlements in the West Bank and Jerusalem amid sharp international criticism that the projects will hurt the peace process with the Palestinians. Hours after releasing a group of Palestinian prisoners Tuesday night, Israel announced the renewal of several developments in the Jerusalem area on lands annexed after the 1967 war, which Palestinians claim for a future state. A number of the projects announced are not new, such as the expansion of the northeast Jewish neighborhood of Ramat Shlomo by 1,500 units.
WORLD
December 19, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Defying a wave of international condemnation, Israel on Wednesday gave final approval to a 2,610-unit housing project in a southern Jerusalem area that Palestinians claim should be part of their future state. The project, called Givat Hamatos, is the first entirely new development approved in 15 years in the Jerusalem area on land Israel seized during the 1967 Middle East War. City officials said the project -- which could begin construction in a year -- is needed to ease the rising cost of housing.
WORLD
December 17, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Israel gave a green light Monday to 1,500 new units of Jewish housing in the Ramat Shlomo development in the northern Jerusalem area, an expansion that had triggered a diplomatic rift with the U.S. after it was first announced during a 2010 visit to Israel by Vice President Joe Biden. The project, located on land Israel seized during the 1967 Middle East war, had been largely dormant after the Obama administration complained that the timing of the announcement during Biden's trip was an “insult.” The U.S. opposes Israeli settlement on land beyond the 1967 Green Line, considering it an obstacle to peace talks.
WORLD
August 11, 2011 | By Batsheva Sobelman, Los Angeles Times
Israel's Interior Ministry approved plans Thursday for 1,600 new housing units in a development built on annexed land in East Jerusalem, a construction project that angered Obama administration officials when it was announced last year. The move also strains relations with Palestinians as they prepared to seek recognition of statehood at the United Nations next month. Interior Minister Eli Yishai suggested that expanding the Ramat Shlomo project was aimed at alleviating a housing shortage that helped spark a wave of protest in the last month by Israelis seeking social and economic reforms.
WORLD
November 8, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Setting the stage for another potential clash with the Obama administration, Israel said Monday that it would build an additional 1,300 homes on disputed land in East Jerusalem. The announcement came as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was visiting the United States to meet with administration officials in an attempt to revive stalled peace talks with the Palestinians. He met Sunday with Vice President Joe Biden and is scheduled to meet with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, both of whom have urged Netanyahu to restrain from new construction in East Jerusalem and the West Bank in order to draw Palestinians back to the negotiating table.
WORLD
March 16, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders and Paul Richter
A day after trying to ease tensions, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday rejected U.S. demands to end the construction of new housing units in disputed East Jerusalem, leaving the two allies in the middle of an increasingly uncomfortable diplomatic feud. The United States wants Netanyahu to order a halt to the construction and make a gesture to Palestinians that could help lead to peace negotiations. But Netanyahu, arguing that construction of housing units on land occupied by Israel since the 1967 Middle East War poses no harm to Palestinians, showed no signs of acquiescing to U.S. demands.
WORLD
March 14, 2010 | By Paul Richter
Beginning as a spat over a single housing project, a dispute this week between the Obama administration and Israel has ballooned into the biggest U.S.-Israeli clash in 20 years, adding to months of strain between Washington and one of its closest allies. Israel's decision to move ahead with 1,600 new housing units in East Jerusalem, announced during a visit by Vice President Joe Biden, drew criticism from Washington in language rarely directed at even Iran or North Korea. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Israel's announcement "was an insult to the United States."
WORLD
November 8, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Setting the stage for another potential clash with the Obama administration, Israel said Monday that it would build an additional 1,300 homes on disputed land in East Jerusalem. The announcement came as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was visiting the United States to meet with administration officials in an attempt to revive stalled peace talks with the Palestinians. He met Sunday with Vice President Joe Biden and is scheduled to meet with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, both of whom have urged Netanyahu to restrain from new construction in East Jerusalem and the West Bank in order to draw Palestinians back to the negotiating table.
WORLD
March 9, 2010 | By Paul Richter
In the midst of a high-profile trip by Vice President Joe Biden, Israel unveiled plans for new housing in disputed Jerusalem on Tuesday, a surprise step that embarrassed and angered the highest ranking Obama administration official yet to visit the country. Biden, who had come to try to smooth relations with a longtime ally and promote new peace talks, denounced Israel's plans to build 1,600 housing units in traditionally Arab East Jerusalem as a threat to the search for peace. "I condemn the decision by the government of Israel to advance planning for new housing units in East Jerusalem," Biden said, calling it "precisely the kind of step that undermines the trust we need right now."
WORLD
March 12, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders
Reporting from Jerusalem — You come for a hug. You leave with a slap. It happens in the Middle East. Vice President Joe Biden's trip this week was supposed to highlight U.S.-Israeli cooperation to counter a perceived nuclear threat from Iran and kick off U.S.-brokered indirect peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians. Instead, talk about Iran was sidetracked and the outlook for peace may be murkier than it was before. Even here, people are not quite sure how that happened.
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