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Rambert Dance Company

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
A century ago, beautiful dancing was everything in ballet. But not long afterward, Antony Tudor and other emerging choreographers created a bold, penetrating style of dance expression, exploring daring themes through a classicism rooted in realistic gesture. And Tudor first introduced his innovations through the London ensemble now called Rambert Dance Company.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2005 | Scott Timberg
Albert EINSTEIN has long been considered one of the artiest of physics innovators. His love of the violin, for instance, is well known, and his admirers talk about the elegant beauty of such formulas as E=mc2. But a ballet in the works at the Rambert Dance Company, Britain's oldest dance troupe, still sounds unlikely.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Choreographer Christopher Bruce has long been the Cotton Mather of ballet and nobody expected him to stop sermonizing when he took over the venerable London-based Rambert Dance Company in 1994. Originally a pioneer classical ensemble, Rambert had become a pillar of rigorous modernism before Bruce gave it its latest identity: high-minded European tanz-theater with a British accent, dramatic in orientation but with plenty of ballet technique on display.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
A century ago, beautiful dancing was everything in ballet. But not long afterward, Antony Tudor and other emerging choreographers created a bold, penetrating style of dance expression, exploring daring themes through a classicism rooted in realistic gesture. And Tudor first introduced his innovations through the London ensemble now called Rambert Dance Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2005 | Scott Timberg
Albert EINSTEIN has long been considered one of the artiest of physics innovators. His love of the violin, for instance, is well known, and his admirers talk about the elegant beauty of such formulas as E=mc2. But a ballet in the works at the Rambert Dance Company, Britain's oldest dance troupe, still sounds unlikely.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Ballet of Cuba will make its first U.S. appearance in more than 16 years as part of the 1997-98 dance season at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The Cubans, in their Orange County debut, will dance a full-length "Cinderella" as staged by Pedro Consuegra to music by Johann Strauss II, on Jan. 20-25.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998
JAZZ * Clayton Hamilton Orchestra at Cal State L.A. F4 MUSIC * Glendale Symphony at Alex Theatre. F6 * Organist James Kibbie at L.A. Bach Festival. F6 * "Madama Butterfly" at San Diego Opera. F10 MOVIES * "Hush" in general release. F4 POP * Jim Brickman at Wiltern Theatre. F5 * Sugar Ray at the Palladium. F5 DANCE * Rambert Dance Company at Veterans Wadsworth Theater. F11
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Cunningham Choreographs: And in more ocean-crossing dance news, Merce Cunningham, the 72-year-old icon of the American avant-garde, will choreograph a piece for a British company this season for the first time in his career. In May, seven members from London's Rambert Dance Company will work alongside Cunningham's own ensemble in New York City. The new piece is scheduled to premiere in June in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1998
Andrea Marcovicci believes that cabaret is "an intensely personal evening of song and stories . . . " (Don't believe us? She says so on her Web site: www.galender.com/andrea/). The singer-actress, who's appeared on screen with Woody Allen and Michael Caine as well as on television programs, including "Cybill" and "Hill Street Blues," will put that philosophy to work as she sings from her latest CD, "New Words," backed by a nine-piece orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1997 | JAN HERMAN
It's a course designed as the theater equivalent of Cliffs Notes but with a price tag that requires deep pockets. For $335, UC Irvine Extension will offer "The Language of the Performing Arts," beginning with a panel discussion Jan. 15, followed by four shows at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa, along with pre-show dinners and lectures at the Wyndham Garden Hotel across the street from the center. The fee amounts to double the cost of the show tickets alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Choreographer Christopher Bruce has long been the Cotton Mather of ballet and nobody expected him to stop sermonizing when he took over the venerable London-based Rambert Dance Company in 1994. Originally a pioneer classical ensemble, Rambert had become a pillar of rigorous modernism before Bruce gave it its latest identity: high-minded European tanz-theater with a British accent, dramatic in orientation but with plenty of ballet technique on display.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Ballet of Cuba will make its first U.S. appearance in more than 16 years as part of the 1997-98 dance season at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The Cubans, in their Orange County debut, will dance a full-length "Cinderella" as staged by Pedro Consuegra to music by Johann Strauss II, on Jan. 20-25.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jiri Kylian's magnificent Nederlands Dans Theater already operates two satellite companies in the Hague, but a splendid performance Sunday by Hubbard Street Dance Chicago suggested that the Windy City now holds a fourth Nederlands ensemble--or at least an unofficial new spinoff. Hubbard Street artistic director Jim Vincent came to Chicago in 2000 after a career that included 12 years as a dancer and ballet master with Nederlands.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Set in capital letters, "NOTHING IS PERMANENT" formed the central statement in the four-line biography of Israeli choreographer Ohad Naharin in the program booklet at UCLA's Royce Hall on Saturday. Don't believe it: Whenever you see Naharin choreography in Southern California, it's always, inevitably, the same greatest-hits jumble. Like it or not, you can count on that kind of permanence.
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