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NATIONAL
July 13, 2012 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times
The first few weeks and months with Sid were a challenge. I could tell you about the string of appointments with vets. Or how he spent all that time cowering in a corner, staring at us as if we were his evil captors. But I'd rather tell you about his life today. To start with, we renamed him Rambo. It seemed fitting for a German shepherd. The "B" honors Biggie, our departed 13-year-old shepherd mix. And he certainly looks like he's been through a war. He was 53 pounds when he was found, and 84 the day we brought him home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Rene Lynch
"The Biggest Loser's" red team sent Lisa Rambo home this week. But the 37-year-old special education teacher from Houlton, Wis., suggested Tuesday morning that the elimination might have been the best thing that could have happened to her. Rambo returned home to a family eager to learn what she learned at the ranch. Her support system appears unshakable: Her four children didn't complain a bit when she swept through the kitchen and tossed all the junk food. Her husband recently yanked the laundry basket out of her hands: You need to stay focused on the finale, he told her. That's right, Rambo is gunning for the at-home prize and just might have the edge given the unwavering determination of her husband: He's lost more than 70 pounds so far. PHOTOS:  The Biggest Loser: Season 14 tackles childhood obesity "I'm over 80 pounds down" so far, Rambo said Tuesday morning during a media conference call, adding: "I'm not finished yet. " She said she told her teammates as much when she was leaving the ranch, challenging them: "You'd better work hard, because I am going to work twice as hard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1985
The radical-liberal media critics (Champlin, Michael Wilmington, Malcolm Boyd) shrilly try to deny the Vietnam sellout by the Cranstons, McGoverns and Churches in the U.S. Senate, and the Kissingers in the executive branch. Things are finally being told as they really were, and some "critics" use Rambo as their whipping posts. FRANK THOMAS MURPHY Glendale
NATIONAL
July 13, 2012 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times
The first few weeks and months with Sid were a challenge. I could tell you about the string of appointments with vets. Or how he spent all that time cowering in a corner, staring at us as if we were his evil captors. But I'd rather tell you about his life today. To start with, we renamed him Rambo. It seemed fitting for a German shepherd. The "B" honors Biggie, our departed 13-year-old shepherd mix. And he certainly looks like he's been through a war. He was 53 pounds when he was found, and 84 the day we brought him home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1990 | Associated Press
A 5-month-old boy in the northeastern city of Salvador in nameless because a judge refused to register him as "Rambo," the newspaper O Globo reported Friday. The boy's father, Miraldo de Moura Eugenio, is a fan of the U.S. movie character and promised to name his first son Rambo, the paper said.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | From Associated Press
Directors announced an independent settlement today with the maker of the "Rambo" movies, but the agreement didn't affect the directors' continuing contract dispute with Hollywood's major producers. The Directors Guild of America signed a contract with Carolco Productions, according to union spokesman Chuck Warn. The union has been signing independent contracts with small production companies over the last few months and now has more than 250 such agreements.
NEWS
October 20, 1986 | From Reuters
American soldiers missing since the Vietnam War may still be alive, but it probably would require a Rambo-style operation to rescue them, Cambodian leader Prince Norodom Sihanouk said in an interview published Sunday. It is not likely that the United States would find any missing Americans, he told Newsweek magazine, but "if you could find one Rambo to go in there, that would be good."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1985
"Rambo" has given Sylvester Stallone an unusual number of opportunities for free exposure on TV, thanks in part to the film's electronic press kit that was prepared by the production company for use by TV news and feature shows. One clip--called a "real life" feature--shows Stallone spending time with a boy who is dying. They walk along a scenic beach, talk about life and the movie, romp together in the surf and check out the controls in Rambo's helicopter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1985 | JACK MATHEWS
It took three months, but Universal's "Back to the Future" has finally slipped past "Rambo: First Blood Part 2" as 1985's box-office leader. The time-warp fantasy, about a modern teen-ager who travels back in time to introduce his parents, grossed $3.9 million last weekend, running its total to $150.2 million, the studio said. "Rambo," which is nearly played out after four months in release, has grossed $148.7 million, according to distributor Tri-Star Pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1985 | From Associated Press
A group that watches over product safety said Monday that Sylvester Stallone's latest Rambo movie is full of mindless violence and should be banned. The British Safety Council, which has 30,000 members, said it had written to members of Parliament and local government councils seeking to ban "Rambo First Blood Part II" from local movie houses. It described the movie as "96 minutes of mindless violence."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2012 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
Jicheng Qian barely noticed the pungent mix of sweat and tanning oil. His focus was on one man, dressed in skimpy purple trunks. As 20 bodybuilders rushed past, Qian yelled at No. 585 to keep his shoulders up. Onstage, Caleb Sun adjusted the position of his abs and tightened his chest. Satisfied with the symmetry of his flexed body, Sun lifted his head and grinned. " A ya ! He's still sagging his shoulders," Qian said. "But, mmm, his form - not bad, not bad at all. " Coaching Chinese hopefuls in Columbus, Ohio, at one of the world's most-talked-about bodybuilding competitions, Qian gazed wistfully at the trophy he never had the chance to win. As a 17-year-old, he watched "Rambo" and "The Terminator" on screen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Kevin Jarre, a screenwriter steeped in American history who wrote the Civil War saga "Glory" and the western "Tombstone," died unexpectedly of heart failure April 3 at his Santa Monica home, said his aunt, Patty Briley Bean. He was 56. Jarre had been a self-described "Civil War freak" since childhood, when he received toy soldiers from the era for Christmas. His interest in the 54th Massachusetts, a regiment that was one of first black units during the Civil War, was piqued when a friend, Lincoln Kirstein, observed that a photograph of Jarre on horseback resembled a statue of Col. Robert Gould Shaw, the regiment's white leader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2010 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
The son of Rambo strides across the grassy field, girded for battle. He wears a T-shirt with the word "famous" all over it. Stainless-steel studs blink from his ears. Two women hawk tortas, chips and bags of pumpkin seeds to more than 100 people filling the bleachers at Bristow Park in Commerce. Ricky Ruiz steps onto the court. He takes off his shirt, revealing a gold crucifix, which he swings around to rest on his back. His father, a muscle-bound, in-your-face character known as Rambo, bulls through the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2008 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
Dear David: You've worked as an actor in New York and Hollywood, made a bundle selling real estate and written plays about global-warming scientists and a Texas mega-church. Now you work on one of the hottest shows on television, "CSI." So why the fascination with someone as retro as Ann Landers? -- Curious -- David RAMBO smiles. "First of all," he says, "she's very theatrical." By that he means Landers, a.k.a.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2008
"HELLO Karen? It's Steven . . ." [May 18] I found a way to get around those annoying writers strikes. Instead of being dependent on creative talent with fresh ideas that shed light on our humanity, I just rehash tired plots and digitally enhance my now-geriatric characters to look youthful so as to appeal to the newest generation of moviegoers. The public loves multiple renditions of the same action figures. Look at the successful remakes of Batman, Spider-Man and Rambo. Helen Tackett Fullerton
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2008 | Carina Chocano, Times Movie Critic
Whether that dangling "w" in the title is some kind of legal concession or just a cute reflection of its protagonists' youth, it more or less sets the tone for "Son of Rambow," a dewy-eyed, plaintive, unafraid-to-be-adorable exercise in stylish nostalgia for a simpler time, when hair was big, cellphones were bigger and Sylvester Stallone was huge.
SPORTS
February 7, 1987
As Super Sunday approached, I was intrigued with the spotlight on one Mr. Mark Bavaro. The media was all over him, but "Rambo" handled it the way "Cobra" would have, keeping to himself and letting his actions do the talking. One incident that passed unnoticed was that when Bavaro caught his touchdown pass, he made the sign of the cross. I thought this was done in deep respect and gratitude, but later I saw the replay and discovered he did it the wrong way! Way to go, Mark, you really blew your cover on this one. I think he was better off doing the Gatorade shuffle or something.
HEALTH
February 4, 2008 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
While many professional athletes have been denying use of human growth hormone to boost performance, one man is standing tall in his support of poor, misunderstood HgH. With the take-no-prisoners bravado of the character he plays in "Rambo," the fourth installment in his hugely successful film franchise, Sylvester Stallone, 61, told Time magazine that HgH was behind the super-buff, senior-licious physique he flaunts in the movie while dispatching a reported 236 bad guys to their maker.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2008 | Peter Rainer, Special to The Times
The posters for "Rambo" that have been proliferating like kudzu across the urban landscape feature a blurry black-and-white rendering of our hero's iconic mug. It's a pop abstraction -- part Che Guevara, part Jesus, part FBI's "Ten Most Wanted" list. The posters are telling us: He's back and, boy, do we ever need him. This Rambo Redux makes sense in a post-9/11 world where nobody in Hollywood seems willing to invent new-style heroes to match up with new-style villains.
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