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Rambo Iii

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BUSINESS
April 25, 1987 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Sylvester Stallone's Rambo character is faster on the trigger than the actor himself has proved to be, and the already delayed start of filming for "Rambo III" now has been set back to September and its release until next summer. After one more change of plans by Stallone, a major new delay in the latest of the wildly successful film series, originally planned for release next Christmas, was reported ruefully Friday by its producer, Carolco Pictures.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2008 | Peter Rainer, Special to The Times
The posters for "Rambo" that have been proliferating like kudzu across the urban landscape feature a blurry black-and-white rendering of our hero's iconic mug. It's a pop abstraction -- part Che Guevara, part Jesus, part FBI's "Ten Most Wanted" list. The posters are telling us: He's back and, boy, do we ever need him. This Rambo Redux makes sense in a post-9/11 world where nobody in Hollywood seems willing to invent new-style heroes to match up with new-style villains.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1988 | DENNIS HUNT
Apparently watching Rambo--the superhero soldier played by Sylvester Stallone--blow away battalions of baddies isn't as much fun as it used to be for home-video audiences; they're not rushing out to rent "Rambo III." After entering the Billboard magazine rental chart at No. 15 last week, it moved up only one place. The action movie may still rally, though. "Shoot to Kill," the thriller starring Sidney Poitier and Tom Berenger, continues to do surprisingly well, inching up another notch to No. 2.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Since drawing "First Blood" in 1982, John Rambo, a taciturn, nihilistic Vietnam vet who favors a bow and arrow and knife over modern weaponry (but can pretty much wipe out an entire regiment single-handedly with anything in reach), became the ultimate symbol of action-movie excess.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1987 | PAT H. BROESKE
After nearly three weeks of crew problems that appeared to threaten Sylvester Stallone's third "Rambo" epic, filming by the Dead Sea near here looks to be getting back on track. "If you need to find me, darlin', you know where I'll be. Just look for the next bomb blast." With that, Sylvester Stallone smiled and prepared to go back into action Monday--in midday temperatures of more than 120 degrees--as the star of "Rambo: First Blood Part III."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
I met a traveller from an antique land who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone stand in the desert... Near them, on the sand, half sunk, a shattered visage lies. . . . --from "Ozymandias," Shelley Actors are prone to fits of narcissism, but in "Rambo III" (citywide), star/writer Sylvester Stallone breaks all the records. Together with his fellow film makers, he's made what may be a $60-million monument to himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1988 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Is John Rambo going soft? Is the muscle-bound, gun-toting commando really just a sensitive '80s guy? A new Tri-Star advertising campaign for "Rambo III," which plays down the film's macho image, is turning heads. Last week, a newspaper ad featured an older woman--a Queens, N.Y. resident who had seen the movie--saying, "You don't have to be macho to love 'Rambo.'
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | PAT H. BROESKE
Sylvester Stallone was in his Rambo get-up, seated on the steps of his trailer in afternoon heat of 120-plus. It was a curious image: Instead of brandishing his glistening "survival" knife, Stallone was wielding a fly swatter. Never missing a beat during an interview, he idly swatted at flies that landed on his pants and bare chest. And he whapped at flies that settled on the khaki-clad legs of the interviewer alongside him. "Did you meet this one?," Stallone said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
John Rambo may be able to mow down entire Soviet divisions at one go, but he has been unable to defeat a much smaller group that has a much greater impact on his cinematic life: the British Board of Film Classification. The board announced Tuesday it had made 24 cuts to "Rambo III" amounting to just over a minute, deleting violent scenes and "glamorous" displays of weaponry, prior to the film's British release.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1990 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
1. Biggest screen 92.75 by 70.5 feet, Keong Emas Imax Theatre, Indonesia 2. Longest film 85-hour "The Cure for Insomnia" 3. Highest pay rate, actor Sylvester Stallone, $19.5 million, "Rambo III" 4. Highest pay rate, actress Barbra Streisand, $5 million, "Nuts" 5. Most portrayed character Sherlock Holmes, 197 films 6. Most costume changes, one person Elizabeth Taylor, 65, "Cleopatra" 7. Most violent movie "Rambo III," 123 deaths, 245 acts of violence 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2008 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
You've no doubt seen the posters around town for the new movie "Rambo," Sylvester Stallone's Vietnam-era warrior-martyr John Rambo made into a street-graffiti-like icon. In a city where massive billboards for movies and TV shows hover over every intersection like demigods, the "Rambo" poster stands out; it's at once eye-catching and subtle, more evocative of a hipster's T-shirt than a marketing scheme to promote the fourth (and first, in 20 years) installment in the "Rambo" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1990 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
1. Biggest screen 92.75 by 70.5 feet, Keong Emas Imax Theatre, Indonesia 2. Longest film 85-hour "The Cure for Insomnia" 3. Highest pay rate, actor Sylvester Stallone, $19.5 million, "Rambo III" 4. Highest pay rate, actress Barbra Streisand, $5 million, "Nuts" 5. Most portrayed character Sherlock Holmes, 197 films 6. Most costume changes, one person Elizabeth Taylor, 65, "Cleopatra" 7. Most violent movie "Rambo III," 123 deaths, 245 acts of violence 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1988 | DENNIS HUNT
Apparently watching Rambo--the superhero soldier played by Sylvester Stallone--blow away battalions of baddies isn't as much fun as it used to be for home-video audiences; they're not rushing out to rent "Rambo III." After entering the Billboard magazine rental chart at No. 15 last week, it moved up only one place. The action movie may still rally, though. "Shoot to Kill," the thriller starring Sidney Poitier and Tom Berenger, continues to do surprisingly well, inching up another notch to No. 2.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
John Rambo may be able to mow down entire Soviet divisions at one go, but he has been unable to defeat a much smaller group that has a much greater impact on his cinematic life: the British Board of Film Classification. The board announced Tuesday it had made 24 cuts to "Rambo III" amounting to just over a minute, deleting violent scenes and "glamorous" displays of weaponry, prior to the film's British release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1988
Marking the end of a two-month, juice-only fast to protest violence in the cinema, anti-war activist Jerry Rubin delivered a giant peace-symbol pizza to actor Sylvester Stallone's home in Malibu Saturday, and took a symbolic bite of its crust. "I feel really, really joyous and peaceful right now," said the 44-year-old director of the Los Angeles Alliance for Survival peace group.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1988
I'm not surprised in the least at the new "un-macho" ad campaign for "Rambo III" ("John Rambo--Mr. Sensitive?," by Nina J. Easton, June 10). This sort of thing is apparently the latest trend among run-of-the-mill film makers, and it is hardly for the better. I think it's safe to say that we thinking women want well-made, well-written, good-looking films with coherent plots. Which is why I won't go to see "Rambo III" (whose makers apparently don't think too highly of their male audiences either--"action-loving male degenerates"?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1988 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
"Rambo III" will open in Britain in late August--but already it's the hot topic of editorials in the Daily Mail and the Daily Express . . . suggesting the bloody movie be banned! Sources further report that the British Board of Film Classification--which awards films "certificates" (like our ratings)--was so concerned about the ultraviolence that it screened the Sly Stallone film several times. The board's consensus: Some violence has to go.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1988 | PAT H. BROESKE
So "Rambo's" being buried at the box office by wimpy types like Tom Hanks and Roger Rabbit. And industry analysts are trying to figure out why. Hey, it's no big question mark for us action fans (and Rambo fanatics). From the moment we got an early look at the film's poster, we knew there were problems. Instead of brandishing a humongous, furious gun, Our Hero was shown in a passive stance. Weaponless . And wearing a shirt! There's something very wrong with that picture.
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