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NEWS
June 7, 2005
Regarding "Beyond the Gates, a Public Gateway" [May 24]: Save me the romance. The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy is a bigger threat to public access than those whose property it seeks to open. To limit public access to the former Barbra Streisand ranch in Ramirez Canyon -- and to capitulate to the residents of Malibu -- is a disgrace, the lowest of the low for a public agency that seems to operate outside any public control. Steve Grace Los Angeles
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2011 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
The 22-acre Malibu ranch with rolling meadows, burbling creeks and homes customized by Barbra Streisand may be a lovely location for weddings or afternoon tea. But Gov. Jerry Brown says state taxpayers have no business owning it, and his proposal to sell the government property in Ramirez Canyon is reverberating from the corridors of Sacramento to the storied seaside colony. The governor has injected himself into an 18-year battle involving Streisand, the city of Malibu and the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, a quasi-autonomous state agency Brown created in 1980 during his first stint as governor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2011 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
The 22-acre Malibu ranch with rolling meadows, burbling creeks and homes customized by Barbra Streisand may be a lovely location for weddings or afternoon tea. But Gov. Jerry Brown says state taxpayers have no business owning it, and his proposal to sell the government property in Ramirez Canyon is reverberating from the corridors of Sacramento to the storied seaside colony. The governor has injected himself into an 18-year battle involving Streisand, the city of Malibu and the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, a quasi-autonomous state agency Brown created in 1980 during his first stint as governor.
NEWS
June 7, 2005
Regarding "Beyond the Gates, a Public Gateway" [May 24]: Save me the romance. The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy is a bigger threat to public access than those whose property it seeks to open. To limit public access to the former Barbra Streisand ranch in Ramirez Canyon -- and to capitulate to the residents of Malibu -- is a disgrace, the lowest of the low for a public agency that seems to operate outside any public control. Steve Grace Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1999
Re "Grant Saves Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy," May 15. Contrary to the assertions of its chief that it has only six employees, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy controls dozens of employees, including those formally employed by its wholly owned subsidiary, the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority. In fact, this year alone (1999), the conservancy has been represented by more than six attorneys. Despite "sitting on" thousands of acres of land scattered throughout Los Angeles County and with three separate headquarters complexes (the Sooky Goldman headquarters in Coldwater Canyon, the Barbra Streisand headquarters in Ramirez Canyon and the newly acquired Los Angeles River complex)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1990 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When real estate developer Charles Tarrats began paving a twisting, 2 1/2-mile road in Malibu's pristine upper Ramirez Canyon without a permit last May, the state Coastal Commission ordered him to stop. He did--for two days. Then the Coastal Commission turned down his request for an emergency permit. Regardless, Tarrats' workmen returned to finish the road that area environmentalists scorned as an "abomination" on the Santa Monica Mountains landscape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2002 | CLAIRE LUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jennie Marie Fockens usually spends her days in a motionless, catatonic haze, drifting in and out of slumber in her purple dragon-print stroller. But when the 6-year-old's world expanded for a day to include 15 bunnies, a knee-high sheep and a brown miniature horse named Chocolate, Jennie emerged from her shell. She ran her fingers through the horse's dark mane, giggling and smiling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1990
The Jan. 12 Metro section had an account of developer Charles Tarrats who, without a Costal Commission permit, built a 2 1/2-mile road through Malibu's largely unspoiled upper Ramirez Canyon. His picture shows him holding a Bible. May I suggest earnestly that he open it to Revelation 7:3 and read " . . . Hurt not the earth, neither the sea, nor the trees. . . ." LEO KENNEDY Santa Barbara
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1998
A group of homeowners has sued the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, saying that the state agency has no business using a residential road to bring guests and catering vans to its facilities. In a complaint filed in Santa Monica Superior Court, about 30 property owners in Ramirez Canyon say that they want a halt to what they say is noisy and dangerous commercial use of a residential road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1996
Officials with the Streisand Center for Conservancy Studies have applied for status as a nonprofit organization to help the conservancy qualify for grants to pay for programs and activities run by the financially strapped group. Most of the grant money would fund a series of environmental education programs on the 22-acre property, which sits atop Ramirez Canyon in Malibu, said Lisa Soghor, program coordinator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2002 | CLAIRE LUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jennie Marie Fockens usually spends her days in a motionless, catatonic haze, drifting in and out of slumber in her purple dragon-print stroller. But when the 6-year-old's world expanded for a day to include 15 bunnies, a knee-high sheep and a brown miniature horse named Chocolate, Jennie emerged from her shell. She ran her fingers through the horse's dark mane, giggling and smiling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1999
Re "Grant Saves Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy," May 15. Contrary to the assertions of its chief that it has only six employees, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy controls dozens of employees, including those formally employed by its wholly owned subsidiary, the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority. In fact, this year alone (1999), the conservancy has been represented by more than six attorneys. Despite "sitting on" thousands of acres of land scattered throughout Los Angeles County and with three separate headquarters complexes (the Sooky Goldman headquarters in Coldwater Canyon, the Barbra Streisand headquarters in Ramirez Canyon and the newly acquired Los Angeles River complex)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1990 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When real estate developer Charles Tarrats began paving a twisting, 2 1/2-mile road in Malibu's pristine upper Ramirez Canyon without a permit last May, the state Coastal Commission ordered him to stop. He did--for two days. Then the Coastal Commission turned down his request for an emergency permit. Regardless, Tarrats' workmen returned to finish the road that area environmentalists scorned as an "abomination" on the Santa Monica Mountains landscape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2009 | Martha Groves
The city of Malibu has sued the California Coastal Commission, seeking to force the agency to rescind its approval of a Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy plan to allow camping at three canyon parks. The city had proposed an amendment to its local coastal program that would have banned overnight camping, but the commission rejected that idea in favor of the conservancy's proposal. Many Malibu residents say the conservancy's plan -- aimed at increasing public access to Ramirez, Escondido and Corral canyon parks, in part by promoting overnight camping -- would increase the risk of wildfires.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1995 | WILLIAM WELLS, William Wells of Calabasas is chairman of the Coalition to Preserve Las Virgenes
The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy is engaged in two seemingly unrelated policy errors of major proportions: * It seems determined to make the purchase of land at Soka University that it has sought for years as hard as possible. After dragging its feet through a condemnation process that it started, the agency is now threatening to sell parkland to raise what it claims could be a huge price set by a court.
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