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Ramiro Cisneros

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
Dump truck. Public pretender. Ramiro Cisneros knows the disparaging names he's called. Everywhere he turns, people look at him with a question mark in their eye. Even his parents at first wondered why he became a public defender in the criminal courts instead of a prosecutor. His clients talk among themselves about being "dumped" onto the public defender's caseload. Sometimes in the courthouse, witnesses mistakenly believe that a public defender is not a lawyer but someone of lesser standing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
Dump truck. Public pretender. Ramiro Cisneros knows the disparaging names he's called. Everywhere he turns, people look at him with a question mark in their eye. Even his parents at first wondered why he became a public defender in the criminal courts instead of a prosecutor. His clients talk among themselves about being "dumped" onto the public defender's caseload. Sometimes in the courthouse, witnesses mistakenly believe that a public defender is not a lawyer but someone of lesser standing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A Fontana woman who has been in jail since February after allegedly driving drunk on two freeways and killing six people in a crash in Diamond Bar is grieving and scared, her attorney said Wednesday. Los Angeles County Deputy Public Defender Ramiro Cisneros said his client, 21-year-old Olivia Carolee Culbreath, has been “very scared” and in grief since her sister and five others were killed in the early morning crash Feb. 9 on the 60 Freeway. Culbreath was handcuffed and wheeled into a Pomona courtroom Wednesday afternoon on a stretcher because she is still unable to walk due to her injuries, Cisneros said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
A fortuneteller's toy sits on the desk in the public defender's office. Shake the pirate's head and lift the eye patch to read the future. Michelle Paffile gives it a try. "Clear sailing ahead, matey." About time, she mutters impatiently. It's about time for the justice system to clear things up and deliver some justice to one defendant. Paffile is a public defender at the Los Angeles County Superior Court in Norwalk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
At 8 o'clock in the morning the single-file line grows to 52 people waiting to shuffle past the sheriff's security checkpoint and into the monolithic stone courthouse. More arrive by the minute. Except for an infant too young to know the paralytic effect of dread on one's spirits and the occasional beep-beep of the metal detector, the aging lobby is hushed. Conversations pass in murmurs or, often, through tense glances or the squeeze of hands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
The public defenders at the Norwalk courthouse begin the day with pancakes and strawberries. Attorney Michelle Paffile won a not guilty verdict in a trial, and by tradition she must bring treats for the 14 other public defenders and the staff assigned to this suburban courthouse in southeast Los Angeles County. This was an especially sweet victory for the young attorney, and she's gone all out on this recent Wednesday with mounds of cakes and berries and whipped cream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
"There are three classes of criminal defendants." Deputy Dist. Atty. Paul Minnetian interrupts preparations for this day's criminal calendar in Los Angeles County Superior Court in Norwalk to talk about the view from his side of the counsel table. "One: Otherwise good people who make a mistake. Like the soccer mom who embezzles from the team. "Two: The repeat offenders who don't do anything heinous. Dope. Nonviolent crimes. You regard them on a sliding scale.
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