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NEWS
June 7, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve days ago, he was under house arrest, forced to escape police by sneaking out a back door and over a rooftop. Today he is president of Guatemala, facing a country in crisis and a delicate relationship with Guatemala's powerful armed forces. Ramiro de Leon Carpio, Guatemala's human rights ombudsman since 1988, was sworn in as president Sunday after a special election in Congress. He replaced President Jorge Serrano, ousted in a bloodless military coup Tuesday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2002 | From Associated Press
Former Guatemalan President Ramiro de Leon Carpio was found dead Tuesday in a Miami apartment, family members said. He was 60. The cause of death was unknown, but a son, Jorge Eduardo de Leon, said his father may have suffered a diabetic coma. The son said his father had trouble regulating his blood sugar in recent days. President Alfonso Portillo announced three days of mourning for De Leon Carpio.
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NEWS
June 8, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bold move on his first full day in office, Guatemalan President Ramiro de Leon Carpio ordered a major shake-up in the powerful armed forces Monday, firing his defense minister and removing the general most closely linked to a coup that triggered weeks of political turmoil here. Two senior officers who are thought to have opposed the power grab staged by former President Jorge Serrano were promoted.
NEWS
December 19, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after his stunning rise to the presidency of Guatemala last June, Ramiro de Leon Carpio did something that surprised and dismayed his supporters. On a visit to the northern city of Huehuetenango, he accepted and proudly displayed a rifle from army-controlled militias that, in the minds of many, have come to symbolize the violence that has devastated this nation for decades.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights ombudsman Ramiro de Leon Carpio was selected president of Guatemala late Saturday, putting an end to the political crisis that has gripped this country but raising questions about whether the military will accept the choice. De Leon, a respected attorney who as a defender of human rights frequently incurred the wrath of the Guatemalan government and army, was designated president by Congress in a second round of voting. He was to be sworn in early today.
NEWS
December 19, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after his stunning rise to the presidency of Guatemala last June, Ramiro de Leon Carpio did something that surprised and dismayed his supporters. On a visit to the northern city of Huehuetenango, he accepted and proudly displayed a rifle from army-controlled militias that, in the minds of many, have come to symbolize the violence that has devastated this nation for decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2002 | From Associated Press
Former Guatemalan President Ramiro de Leon Carpio was found dead Tuesday in a Miami apartment, family members said. He was 60. The cause of death was unknown, but a son, Jorge Eduardo de Leon, said his father may have suffered a diabetic coma. The son said his father had trouble regulating his blood sugar in recent days. President Alfonso Portillo announced three days of mourning for De Leon Carpio.
NEWS
December 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guatemala's human rights attorney identified three military officers who he said were responsible for the killing of 13 Indians in a rural town. Attorney Ramiro de Leon Carpio also urged authorities to shut down a nearby 600-soldier army base as a gesture of peace toward the villagers of Santiago Atitlan.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | Associated Press
Guatemalans voted out the Congress and Supreme Court in an anti-corruption referendum that drew fewer than one in five voters to the polls. Opponents of the referendum called by President Ramiro de Leon Carpio said the low turnout showed the public did not support the proposed constitutional amendments. De Leon called the turnout "unfortunate" but said the vote was nonetheless a defeat for the "enemies of democracy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1993
It would be most unfortunate and very costly if the U.S. were to recognize only too late the magnificent opportunity we have to support a true democrat and a sincere human rights advocate in the new president of Guatemala. President Ramiro de Leon Carpio has the potential to do what billions of American tax dollars and the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives has not been able to do in Central America. De Leon's willingness to oppose the violent military clique, the real power in Guatemala, exemplified in dismissing after only 17 days his despotic defense minister, Gen. Roberto Perussina, shows a courage and wisdom unknown in Central America.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bold move on his first full day in office, Guatemalan President Ramiro de Leon Carpio ordered a major shake-up in the powerful armed forces Monday, firing his defense minister and removing the general most closely linked to a coup that triggered weeks of political turmoil here. Two senior officers who are thought to have opposed the power grab staged by former President Jorge Serrano were promoted.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve days ago, he was under house arrest, forced to escape police by sneaking out a back door and over a rooftop. Today he is president of Guatemala, facing a country in crisis and a delicate relationship with Guatemala's powerful armed forces. Ramiro de Leon Carpio, Guatemala's human rights ombudsman since 1988, was sworn in as president Sunday after a special election in Congress. He replaced President Jorge Serrano, ousted in a bloodless military coup Tuesday.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights ombudsman Ramiro de Leon Carpio was selected president of Guatemala late Saturday, putting an end to the political crisis that has gripped this country but raising questions about whether the military will accept the choice. De Leon, a respected attorney who as a defender of human rights frequently incurred the wrath of the Guatemalan government and army, was designated president by Congress in a second round of voting. He was to be sworn in early today.
NEWS
April 3, 1994 | From Reuters
The president of Guatemala's Constitutional Court was shot and killed Friday night outside his home in Guatemala City as he returned with his family from a Holy Week celebration, a court spokeswoman said Saturday. No one claimed responsibility for the shooting by unidentified gunmen who were believed to have opened fire from a vehicle about 10:45 p.m.
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