Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRamon Amezcua
IN THE NEWS

Ramon Amezcua

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Think of Ramon Amezcua as a real life comic book superhero, a masked avenger with a difficult mission: the reinvention of Mexican music. Just as Bruce Wayne becomes Batman, the Tijuana resident has two distinct identities. During the day, he is Ramon Amezcua, a 38-year-old orthodontist and family man. At night, however, he becomes the enigmatic and increasingly popular Bostich, godfather of a revolutionary new movement known as Nortec.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
On a Pacific Ocean-cooled Sunday night last October, a crowd of 25,000 people thronged the streets outside the Tijuana Cultural Center to witness a startling musical experiment. Packed two- and three-deep on the outdoor stage near the Avenue of Heroes, several members of the Baja California Symphony Orchestra, led by conductor Ivan del Prado, conjured lush melodies more suited to a concert hall than a gritty urban thoroughfare. Overhead, a jumbo screen flashed Pop Art graphics ("BANG!"
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
On a Pacific Ocean-cooled Sunday night last October, a crowd of 25,000 people thronged the streets outside the Tijuana Cultural Center to witness a startling musical experiment. Packed two- and three-deep on the outdoor stage near the Avenue of Heroes, several members of the Baja California Symphony Orchestra, led by conductor Ivan del Prado, conjured lush melodies more suited to a concert hall than a gritty urban thoroughfare. Overhead, a jumbo screen flashed Pop Art graphics ("BANG!"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Think of Ramon Amezcua as a real life comic book superhero, a masked avenger with a difficult mission: the reinvention of Mexican music. Just as Bruce Wayne becomes Batman, the Tijuana resident has two distinct identities. During the day, he is Ramon Amezcua, a 38-year-old orthodontist and family man. At night, however, he becomes the enigmatic and increasingly popular Bostich, godfather of a revolutionary new movement known as Nortec.
NEWS
August 4, 2005 | Agustin Gurza
Nortec Collective Tijuana Sessions Vol. 3 (Nacional) * * 1/2 This tribe of border DJs drew international attention when it debuted in 2001 with Vol. 1 of "Tijuana Sessions," a bold attempt to digitally recycle the dense atmosphere of a town known for its tackiness, violence and corruption. Nortec processed the city's sounds and sensations through laptops, converting Tijuana kitsch into techno chic. Down to five acts from seven, the collective returns with its sophomore release, "Vol. 3."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2008 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
When Nortec Collective emerged on the world stage seven years ago from its base in Tijuana, the group was hailed as a cutting-edge exponent of a dynamic border culture on the rise. Recently, however, the artistic promise of that teeming, edgy metropolis has been overshadowed by an outburst of shocking violence tied to turf wars between rival drug cartels.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2009 | Reed Johnson and Deborah Bonello
Growing up in a middle-class home in Mexico City's genteel Coyoacan neighborhood, Camilo Lara watched MTV and listened to the Happy Mondays and the Charlatans, "in my room, very loud." But whenever he drifted into his family's communal living spaces or the kitchen, he'd get a shot of Jose Jose, classical music, cumbia (which the family's cook favored) or "some crappy Mexican pop."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER, Ernesto Lechner is a regular contributor to Calendar
On a recent night in Mexico City, Ramon "Bostich" Amezcua, a founder of the Tijuana electronica collective Nortec, was surprised to see an older gentleman dancing at the front of the stage during Amezcua's live DJ set. He recognized the man as Orlando "Cachaito" Lopez, the 68-year-old bassist with the Buena Vista Social Club and the nephew of legendary mambo inventor Israel "Cachao" Lopez.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER
Two years ago, a couple of days before the millennium celebration, Julieta Venegas returned from South America to her native Mexico with a broken heart. After a year of marriage, her husband, Chilean rock star Alvaro Enriquez, had told the singer that he was leaving her for a soap opera starlet.
NEWS
February 23, 2006 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
AS the white stretch limo glides down the street, three blond gringas poke their heads out the sun roof and start yelling come-ons at anyone within earshot. Nearby, a pair of hookers waits next to a pay phone, laughing hysterically over who knows what. A guy in Raider Nation regalia struts past D'Volada coffee shop, where the cappuccinos are as strong as a double shot of tequila. Across the street, hip-hop blasts from one of those bars popular with San Diego frat boys.
MAGAZINE
January 18, 2004 | Josh Kun, Josh Kun is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer and cultural critic who teaches in the English Department at UC Riverside.
It's midnight in Tijuana, and inside the Nuevo Ferrari junkyard on the deserted boulevard Diaz Ordaz, dancers in matching red-and-yellow mechanics' uniforms balance on rusting steel railings. Sound artists blast cavernous mixes from a hollowed-out Volkswagen van. Spray paint stencils of wrenches and demolished cars cover four stories of towering cement walls. There are TV screens to watch, T-shirts to buy and, outside, DJs spin icy house music in front of balletic makeshift auto sculptures.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|