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Ramon Cernuda

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NEWS
August 7, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Three leading human rights activists who outspokenly criticized the regime of Cuban President Fidel Castro were arrested in pre-dawn raids on their homes in Havana on Sunday, according to a representative of Cuban rights organizations here. The three, Elizardo Sanchez, Hubert Jerez and Hiram Abi Cobas were picked up only days after they complained to visiting American journalists of an intensified crackdown against dissidents by the Castro government.
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NEWS
August 7, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Three leading human rights activists who outspokenly criticized the regime of Cuban President Fidel Castro were arrested in pre-dawn raids on their homes in Havana on Sunday, according to a representative of Cuban rights organizations here. The three, Elizardo Sanchez, Hubert Jerez and Hiram Abi Cobas were picked up only days after they complained to visiting American journalists of an intensified crackdown against dissidents by the Castro government.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The U.S. Customs Service has accused a U.S. official of involvement with a network that smuggled Cuban artwork into the United States for personal gain and to benefit members of the Cuban government, Reuters news agency reported. Customs special agent Peter Liston alleged in a Miami court affidavit that Jerry Scott, a public affairs officer at the U.S. Interests Section in Havana, illegally brought around 40 Cuban paintings from Cuba to Miami International Airport in February, 1988.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Dec. 19, Orestes Lorenzo Perez, a Cuban military pilot who had defected to the United States in 1991, took a daring risk. Flying a small, aging plane back into Cuba, he landed in the middle of a crowded highway, picked up his wife and two sons and returned to this country. When Lorenzo's plane landed in the Florida Keys, it was met by a group of supporters, including a representative of the Valladares Foundation, the Virginia-based human rights organization that helped set up the rescue.
NEWS
April 6, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For months, Miami had been calm--almost too calm. No death threats had been leveled at liberal radio commentators or outspoken professors. The Miami Herald's newspaper boxes were not being vandalized by readers who objected to its editorial policy. The Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture opened an exhibition of works by an artist with ties to Cuba, and, though there were threats, no one actually bombed the place. "We were surprised," museum director Ramon Cernuda said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the month that it has been operating, TV Marti has done little more than broadcast a few old "Kate & Allie" reruns. But the U.S.-supported station that is beamed into Cuba has created an international dispute and spurred a congressional investigation that threatens to pull the plug on the effort to expose residents of that Communist nation to a U.S. perspective. Private and congressional critics have attacked nearly every aspect of TV Marti, from its legality to its programming.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a sign that political unrest in Cuba is continuing, Cuban hijackers commandeered a naval vessel, killed a Cuban naval officer and set sail for the United States, U.S. and Cuban officials said Tuesday. The Coast Guard said it had intercepted a 50-foot green-hulled vessel that matched the description of the hijacked ship but was not certain it was the same vessel. About 27 would-be emigres were taken into custody. The hijacking, reported to U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, Mike Clary, a writer in Miami, is a frequent contributor to The Times.
If only Tomas Esson would lighten up, he has been told repeatedly, he could be a major success. In Cuba, paintings that combined politics and sex in grotesque caricatures of hallowed revolutionary symbols eventually led the government to all but invite him to defect. Two years ago, he did.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | SANDRA WALEWSKI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For many years, Cuban exiles here have seized on almost any opportunity to reinforce their hard line toward Fidel Castro's Cuba. Sports and cultural events, artists and academicians all have been embroiled at times in controversy about attitudes toward Cuba. Some of the disputes have sparked threats, public protests and violence.
NEWS
October 7, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Measured against the yardsticks of Cuban history and personal travail, the meeting in Havana was extraordinary. Eloy Gutierrez Menoyo, who spent 22 brutal years in prison, shook hands with his former jailer, then asked the gray-bearded dictator for permission to return to Cuba and set up an opposition political party. Impassively, Fidel Castro looked his onetime revolutionary comrade in the eye and acknowledged the request with the slightest nod. We'll see, el maximo lider seemed to say, we'll see. Yet perhaps more extraordinary than that June meeting between two old enemies was the scene at Miami International Airport a few hours later, when Gutierrez Menoyo returned home.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the window of a storefront art gallery, the work on exhibit still drips with desperation. Strewn about the tiny plywood deck are plastic water bottles, a Russian-made medicine jar, a worn pair of shoes, a rusted knife blade, sand and seaweed. The tattered sail is tied to the mast with intravenous tubing apparently scavenged from a hospital. The hull is carved from plastic foam. "These rafts are like antiquarian African masks," said Cesar Trasobares, an artist and curator.
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