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Ramon Eduardo Ruiz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ramon Eduardo Ruiz, a renowned historian of Mexico and Latin America whose books included in-depth studies of the Mexican and Cuban revolutions, has died. He was 88. Ruiz, an emeritus professor of history at UC San Diego, died Tuesday at his home in Rancho Santa Fe of complications from a recent fall and a battle with cancer, said his daughter Olivia Ruiz. Ruiz, who joined the history department at UC San Diego in 1970 and chaired the department in the early '70s, was the author of 15 books, including "Triumphs and Tragedy: A History of the Mexican People," "Cuba: The Making of a Revolution," "The Great Rebellion: Mexico, 1905-1924" and "On the Rim of Mexico: Encounters of the Rich and Poor."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ramon Eduardo Ruiz, a renowned historian of Mexico and Latin America whose books included in-depth studies of the Mexican and Cuban revolutions, has died. He was 88. Ruiz, an emeritus professor of history at UC San Diego, died Tuesday at his home in Rancho Santa Fe of complications from a recent fall and a battle with cancer, said his daughter Olivia Ruiz. Ruiz, who joined the history department at UC San Diego in 1970 and chaired the department in the early '70s, was the author of 15 books, including "Triumphs and Tragedy: A History of the Mexican People," "Cuba: The Making of a Revolution," "The Great Rebellion: Mexico, 1905-1924" and "On the Rim of Mexico: Encounters of the Rich and Poor."
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OPINION
March 25, 2005
As your March 19 report ("Mayor Polishes Political Images") says, President Vicente Fox and his conservative allies may bar Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the popular reform mayor of Mexico City, from seeking the presidency in 2006. This makes a mockery of Mexican democracy. Fox is playing with fire, for all is not well in Mexico. Inequality is rampant. One Mexican is the fourth-richest man in the world, and 11 others are among the wealthiest. Yet half of the country's inhabitants live in poverty and some, calling hovels home, daily go hungry.
NEWS
November 8, 1998
Re Scott Martelle's article on Ramon Eduardo Ruiz ("A Present From Mexico's Past," Nov. 3), how beautiful and wise this man is. We gringos look at Mexico as filled with Mexicans--all of whom, we feel, are gardeners or children of gardeners. We build walls to keep "them" out, forgetting that we are the agricultural leader of the world and that we cannot do it without their hard work. We should be grateful that they bring new generations into our hemisphere, often educated in our colleges, children of parents who are gentle and have a dedication to their kids' education and comfort.
NEWS
October 11, 1995
A retired UC San Diego historian on Tuesday praised Chicano activist and Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna, saying UC Santa Barbara should have hired him. Testifying in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1987
Your editorial "Mexico: Troubling Question" (Oct. 7), indeed, leaves one both troubled and questioning. Carlos Salinas de Gortari, Mexico's next president, you admit, has "not much standing with the people;" he is a colorless candidate "who has never faced the voters in an election." His choice, you imply, "seems to ignore the public" will, while democracy, American vintage, it appears, has been flouted. Yet, ironically, you applaud the selection of Salinas de Gortari by Mexico's oligarchy.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Historian Ramon Eduardo Ruiz, a professor emeritus at UC San Diego, has been named a National Humanities Medal winner, one of nine selected for the annual honor. The medals, chosen by officials of the National Endowment for the Humanities to honor people and organizations "whose work has deepened the nation's understanding of the humanities," will be handed out at the White House on Nov. 5. Other winners being announced today include historian and biographer Stephen E. Ambrose; novelist E.L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998
In his analysis of the decline of the PRI, Sam Quinones (Opinion, March 8) is only partly right. To say that the PRI has no "overarching ideology" is just plain wrong; it is adamantly neoliberal. And the rise of political opposition is just one factor; equally important is the decaying economic structure. True, the PRI's slide dates from 1968, when priistas sent soldiers to kill middle-class student protesters, a decision that angered many. But the economic malaise also stems from that time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1993 | RICHARD JEPPERSON, Richard M. Jepperson is an adjunct professor of communications at Cal Poly Pomona. He has directed and taught on-reservation training programs for the Sioux, Cheyenne and Navajo. His grandfather was French and Cree. and
The school board of Santa Clarita should have been more careful about naming a high school after a supposed bandit hero of the romantic past. Tiburcio Vasquez is an unworthy candidate for canonization. "Foreigners in Their Native Land: Historical Roots of the Mexican American," a respected text edited by David J. Weber with foreword by Ramon Eduardo Ruiz, contains this passage wherein Vasquez explained why he was driven to crime: "Americans . . . would . . .
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK and ANTHONY OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. District Court jury Monday found that UC Santa Barbara illegally rejected Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna, a pioneer in Chicano studies, for a senior teaching position because he was too old. Outside the U.S. District Courthouse in Los Angeles, a jubilant Acuna, 63, was looking to hug anyone in sight, including reporters. He settled, however, for his family and his attorney, Moises Vazquez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired University of California historian, the highly regarded author of 13 books, praised the scholarship of Cal State Northridge professor and Chicano activist Rodolfo Acuna on Tuesday, saying UC Santa Barbara should have hired him. Testifying in U.S.
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