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Ramon Martin Huerta

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NEWS
September 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
A series of explosions ripped through a busy area of street stalls and shops in this central Mexican city on Sunday, killing at least 56 people and injuring 348. Interior Minister Diodoro Carrasco said the explosions apparently began in the back of a candy store, where fireworks were sold. News reports indicated that other explosions followed in surrounding shops. "It's a very big tragedy," Mayor Ricardo Suarez said on the national TV Azteca network.
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WORLD
August 14, 2004 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Mexico's top federal law enforcement officer, public security secretary Alejandro Gertz Manero, resigned Friday, a surprise move even though it came amid a growing public outcry against a national crime wave. On June 27, an estimated 250,000 marchers took to the streets of Mexico City to protest the kidnappings, murders and robberies that have terrorized the capital and other large cities in recent months. It is believed to be the largest such protest on record.
WORLD
September 23, 2005 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
An undersecretary of public security, Rafael Rios Garcia, will serve as interim security secretary until a permanent replacement can be found for Ramon Martin Huerta, who was killed Wednesday along with eight others in a midday helicopter crash.
WORLD
January 15, 2005 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Mexican forces backed by tanks and helicopters raided the maximum-security La Palma prison near here early Friday morning to thwart what officials called a possible planned escape of inmates held for drug trafficking. The raid came amid a turf war at the prison, where many drug cartel leaders are imprisoned, and across Mexico, the main transit corridor for Colombian cocaine headed for the United States.
WORLD
September 22, 2005 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
Mexico's top federal law enforcement officer, a longtime ally of President Vicente Fox who led the war against a rising tide of national violence, was killed Wednesday along with eight others in a helicopter crash. Ramon Martin Huerta, secretary of public security, was traveling to a ceremony for new prison guards at Mexico's maximum-security La Palma prison when the Bell 412 helicopter crashed into a mountain about 30 miles west of the capital, authorities said.
WORLD
January 6, 2005 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
The New Year's Eve slaying of a narco-trafficker's brother in Mexico's highest-security prison resulted Wednesday in the detention of the prison warden and renewed criticism of the government's seeming inability to curb the power and reach of the nation's deadly drug cartels. Arturo Guzman Loera, brother of Sinaloa-based drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was shot seven times by an assassin in an area of La Palma prison set aside for inmates to talk with their attorneys.
WORLD
December 7, 2004 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
President Vicente Fox fired two police chiefs Monday for their role in the tardy response to a mob attack that killed two undercover agents. But the move failed to halt partisan squabbling over responsibility for the Nov. 23 lynching of the officers. With public outrage still simmering, Fox ousted Marcelo Ebrard, the capital's police chief, who works directly for Mayor Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, a leading opposition candidate for president in 2006.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was classic Vicente Fox. The grinning president-elect, with his trademark bushy mustache, offered Mexicans his well-known phrase: "There won't be one single reason to turn back nostalgically to the past." "We're already there," he added, holding up a newspaper headline about a vote to tighten the antiabortion law in Guanajuato, his home state. The smiling Fox was penned by an artist at the Mexico City daily La Jornada, which ran the cartoon with the caption, "Welcome to the 17th century."
WORLD
November 6, 2008 | Ken Ellingwood, Ellingwood is a Times staff writer.
Mexican authorities said Wednesday that investigators found no immediate signs of foul play in the plane crash that killed the country's interior minister and 13 other people.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of the lowest points of Vicente Fox's life. He had just lost a fraud-riddled race for governor of his native state, Guanajuato. He was broke. And his wife had left him after two decades of marriage. To anyone else, Fox looked like a political corpse in the early 1990s. Not to Fox. In the depths of his crisis, he set a quixotic goal: to seek Mexico's presidency, taking on an authoritarian system run by the world's longest-ruling party.
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