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Ramon V Mitra

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MAGAZINE
April 26, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, Bob Drogin is The Times' Manila bureau chief; his last story for this magazine was on the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo.
THE DREADED "CHARACTER ISSUE" EXPLODED ONTO MANILA'S FRONT PAGES SHORTLY AFter the Philippine presidential race began this spring. Unlike in America, it wasn't a cheesy supermarket tabloid but the outgoing president, Corazon Aquino, who blew the whistle on sex and politics. Without naming names, she implied on a radio show that some of the candidates campaigning to succeed her had been unfaithful to their wives. She urged the next president to focus on affairs of state, not the heart.
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MAGAZINE
April 26, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, Bob Drogin is The Times' Manila bureau chief; his last story for this magazine was on the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo.
THE DREADED "CHARACTER ISSUE" EXPLODED ONTO MANILA'S FRONT PAGES SHORTLY AFter the Philippine presidential race began this spring. Unlike in America, it wasn't a cheesy supermarket tabloid but the outgoing president, Corazon Aquino, who blew the whistle on sex and politics. Without naming names, she implied on a radio show that some of the candidates campaigning to succeed her had been unfaithful to their wives. She urged the next president to focus on affairs of state, not the heart.
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NEWS
May 5, 1992
About 25 million Filipinos are expected to go to the polls next Monday for a remarkable election in which virtually every office in the land is at stake. Voters will choose a new president and vice president, 24 senators, 200 congressmen, and 16,979 provincial and local officials. More than 82,000 people are running. In the presidential race, seven candidates are competing to succeed Corazon Aquino, who has declined to run again.
NEWS
December 6, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Corazon Aquino surprised many here recently when she corralled an unlikely coalition of Philippine senators behind her plan to offer the United States a three-year lease at Subic Bay Naval Base. How did she do it? "We threatened them with clean elections," one presidential aide explained with a grin. He paused, then added, "That's a joke." Still, few are laughing as the Philippines prepares for elections May 11.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bonfires of burning tires lit the night sky, and scowling guards armed with assault rifles checked everyone who entered Rodolfo Aguinaldo's bunker-like concrete command center--surrounded by a 12-foot-high barbed wire fence. Inside, President Corazon Aquino's latest nightmare was holding court. "I'm a pain in the everything," Aguinaldo told visitors with a grin. "In Manila, they get constipated every time they think of me."
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Agonizingly slow counting of more than 25 million ballots led to growing suspense and controversy today as an outspoken former judge and political newcomer held a tenuous lead in early returns against outgoing President Corazon Aquino's personal choice in the bitterly fought Philippine presidential race.
NEWS
May 1, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven days before voters go to the polls, the Philippine presidential campaign remains remarkably muddied, with four of the seven candidates locked in a tight race marked by bitter name-calling, wild intrigues and strong partisanship by a key Catholic leader. None of the four candidates--businessman Eduardo Cojuangco Jr., House Speaker Ramon V. Mitra, former Defense Secretary Fidel V.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overshadowed by the brass bands and bunting, banners and balloons on this first rowdy weekend of the Philippines' 90-day national election campaign, a billboard erected at a major Manila intersection is perhaps the best sign of the times in this troubled land. "Thou Shalt Not Kill--Keep the Election Safe," it reads. That is a daunting challenge as the nation that overthrew dictator Ferdinand E.
MAGAZINE
April 8, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, Bob Drogin is The Times' Manila bureau chief.
THE GUNS BOOM THEIR salute in the morning haze, echoing from the hills. Down on the parade ground, the cadets stand stiffly in the stifling heat, 146 ramrod-straight youths wearing heavy gray wool tunics and red-plumed hats copied from West Point. It is graduation weekend at the Philippine Military Academy, in the mountains five hours north of Manila, and President Corazon C. Aquino is coming to call.
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