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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1996 | ANA FACIO CONTRERAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many of the students at Ramona High School in Boyle Heights have madrinas (godmothers) in their immediate families. But few of them can compare to the madrinas they have at school. Las Madrinas, a nonprofit professional women's group with 21 members, has been providing a crucial social link to the alternative school for nearly a decade.
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NEWS
October 18, 2000 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The girls at Ramona High School have troubles of their own. Troubles with gangs, with grades, with truancy, troubles with drugs, with foster homes, with babies. That's why they're here--the tiny campus in Boyle Heights was founded half a century ago as a haven for troubled girls.
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NEWS
October 18, 2000 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The girls at Ramona High School have troubles of their own. Troubles with gangs, with grades, with truancy, troubles with drugs, with foster homes, with babies. That's why they're here--the tiny campus in Boyle Heights was founded half a century ago as a haven for troubled girls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2000 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dean's message for her newest high school students was couched in the cold, hard language of a prison intake center. "We have students from 20 gangs here, but they don't flag it or flaunt it, and neither will you," Frances Vilaubi told the young women on their first day at Ramona High School, an all-girl campus four miles east of downtown. Ramona's dress code allowed two colors, blue and white, she said. No polka dots, stripes, plaids or logos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2000 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dean's message for her newest high school students was couched in the cold, hard language of a prison intake center. "We have students from 20 gangs here, but they don't flag it or flaunt it, and neither will you," Frances Vilaubi told the young women on their first day at Ramona High School, an all-girl campus four miles east of downtown. Ramona's dress code allowed two colors, blue and white, she said. No polka dots, stripes, plaids or logos.
SPORTS
December 30, 1986 | CHRIS DE LUCA
The possibility that a low-level 2-A division will be added for next season appears slim, according to San Diego Section Commissioner Kendall Webb. The division, which will be discussed by the Section's coordinating council on Jan. 7, has been proposed by Coronado High School for teams too strong to play 1-A schools but not good enough to compete against other 2-A schools. Section rules require four teams to participate in such a division. Coronado, Marian, St.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | GARY KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Renee Gutierrez skipped her senior prom this year so she could venture to Texas and compete in a tournament for the San Gabriel Volleyball Club. Gutierrez, who lives in Pasadena and graduated from Sacred Heart High School in La Canada Flintridge, figures the sacrifice was worth it. After all, the skills she polished playing club volleyball helped her earn a scholarship to UC Berkeley, where she will be a freshman in the fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1996 | ANA FACIO CONTRERAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many of the students at Ramona High School in Boyle Heights have madrinas (godmothers) in their immediate families. But few of them can compare to the madrinas they have at school. Las Madrinas, a nonprofit professional women's group with 21 members, has been providing a crucial social link to the alternative school for nearly a decade.
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