Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRamona Pageant
IN THE NEWS

Ramona Pageant

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2000 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a mountainside and a 6,600-plus-seat natural amphitheater as its stage,"The Ramona Pageant," a family theater tradition since 1923, returns to the Hemet-San Jacinto Valley for three weekends, April 29 through May 14. This epic production, set in 1850s California and based on Helen Hunt Jackson's novel about fictional tragic lovers Ramona and Allesandro, dramatizes life and strife among Native Americans, Mexican rancheros and white settlers from the East.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2003 | Don Shirley
Although a certain outdoor theatrical event in Hemet is marking its 80th birthday this year, it's still undergoing a bit of an identity crisis. Is "Ramona" an "outdoor play" or a "pageant"? It's certainly an outdoor play, in which performers act out a story about star-crossed lovers and the abuse of California's Indians, based on Helen Hunt Jackson's 1884 novel.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Anderson is the Ramona Pageant's first new director since 1968, and he has made some changes in Southern California's long-running rancho romance. This is no Ramona Revolution. Based on Helen Hunt Jackson's 1884 novel, the outdoor pageant still is set in 1850s California. As always, Ramona and Alessandro find their love initially thwarted by her Mexican guardian's prejudice against Native Americans.
BOOKS
March 30, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
Helen Hunt Jackson is best remembered for the 1884 novel "Ramona," a romantic tale of old California that was the inspiration for the so-called Ramona Pageant, the closest thing to a passion play that the popular culture of California has yet produced. Nearly every summer since 1923, amid the cactus and chaparral near Hemet, the saga of Ramona, half-Indian and half-Scottish, and her full-blooded Indian lover, Alessandro, has been staged for audiences that now exceed 2 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mt. San Jacinto looms on the left. Horses gallop across the rancho. Dozens of American Indians suddenly materialize on the hillside. Several thousand spectators sit in the sunshine, munching hot dogs and sipping soda. The Ramona Pageant, enacted each spring during 65 of the last 70 years, featuring a cast of 350, is in high gear. But it's more than just another tourist attraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2003 | Don Shirley
Although a certain outdoor theatrical event in Hemet is marking its 80th birthday this year, it's still undergoing a bit of an identity crisis. Is "Ramona" an "outdoor play" or a "pageant"? It's certainly an outdoor play, in which performers act out a story about star-crossed lovers and the abuse of California's Indians, based on Helen Hunt Jackson's 1884 novel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1997 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE
A trip to the annual Ramona Pageant, a spectacle based on the Helen Hunt Jackson novel, "Ramona," is being sponsored by the Ojai Valley Chamber of Commerce. Tickets for the April 18 performance are still available. Cost is $80 per person for members and $90 per person for non-members. The cost includes transportation, admission and dinner. For information, call 646-8126.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2001
The Ramona Pageant has gone from re-creating California history to being California history. Adapted from Helen Hunt Jackson's 1884 novel about mistreatment of California's Indians, the outdoor drama has been produced annually since 1923. This year's staging will include 400 actors, singers, dancers and horsemen. For the third year, Cesaria Hernandez returns in the title role and Vincent Whipple reprises the part of her Indian lover, Alessandro.
BOOKS
March 30, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
Helen Hunt Jackson is best remembered for the 1884 novel "Ramona," a romantic tale of old California that was the inspiration for the so-called Ramona Pageant, the closest thing to a passion play that the popular culture of California has yet produced. Nearly every summer since 1923, amid the cactus and chaparral near Hemet, the saga of Ramona, half-Indian and half-Scottish, and her full-blooded Indian lover, Alessandro, has been staged for audiences that now exceed 2 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
"I am going to write a novel, in which will be set forth some Indians' experiences in a way to move people's hearts," vowed novelist Helen Hunt Jackson in 1883. The result was "Ramona," a romance of Old California, about the love of a noble Indian and a beautiful Mission girl. Published in 1884, Jackson's novel is still tugging hearts. And so is Hemet's 66-year-old "Ramona Pageant." With a cast of more than 350 people, the "Ramona Pageant" uses an entire mountainside as its stage and is attended by 39,000 annually.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2001
The Ramona Pageant has gone from re-creating California history to being California history. Adapted from Helen Hunt Jackson's 1884 novel about mistreatment of California's Indians, the outdoor drama has been produced annually since 1923. This year's staging will include 400 actors, singers, dancers and horsemen. For the third year, Cesaria Hernandez returns in the title role and Vincent Whipple reprises the part of her Indian lover, Alessandro.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2000 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a mountainside and a 6,600-plus-seat natural amphitheater as its stage,"The Ramona Pageant," a family theater tradition since 1923, returns to the Hemet-San Jacinto Valley for three weekends, April 29 through May 14. This epic production, set in 1850s California and based on Helen Hunt Jackson's novel about fictional tragic lovers Ramona and Allesandro, dramatizes life and strife among Native Americans, Mexican rancheros and white settlers from the East.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1997 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE
A trip to the annual Ramona Pageant, a spectacle based on the Helen Hunt Jackson novel, "Ramona," is being sponsored by the Ojai Valley Chamber of Commerce. Tickets for the April 18 performance are still available. Cost is $80 per person for members and $90 per person for non-members. The cost includes transportation, admission and dinner. For information, call 646-8126.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Anderson is the Ramona Pageant's first new director since 1968, and he has made some changes in Southern California's long-running rancho romance. This is no Ramona Revolution. Based on Helen Hunt Jackson's 1884 novel, the outdoor pageant still is set in 1850s California. As always, Ramona and Alessandro find their love initially thwarted by her Mexican guardian's prejudice against Native Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mt. San Jacinto looms on the left. Horses gallop across the rancho. Dozens of American Indians suddenly materialize on the hillside. Several thousand spectators sit in the sunshine, munching hot dogs and sipping soda. The Ramona Pageant, enacted each spring during 65 of the last 70 years, featuring a cast of 350, is in high gear. But it's more than just another tourist attraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
"I am going to write a novel, in which will be set forth some Indians' experiences in a way to move people's hearts," vowed novelist Helen Hunt Jackson in 1883. The result was "Ramona," a romance of Old California, about the love of a noble Indian and a beautiful Mission girl. Published in 1884, Jackson's novel is still tugging hearts. And so is Hemet's 66-year-old "Ramona Pageant." With a cast of more than 350 people, the "Ramona Pageant" uses an entire mountainside as its stage and is attended by 39,000 annually.
TRAVEL
January 25, 2009
Thank you for your article on the "Ramona" pageant ["Golden Girl," Jan. 11.] This play is truly a treasure. No article on the play would be complete without the mention of my beautiful, late mother-in-law, Juanita Encell Shields. She played Ramona starting in 1941, then from 1946 to 1948 after a break in performances for World War II. She played Ramona again in 1950 after the birth of my husband (the first of her two sons). In fact, my husband recalls having his first birthday party on the "Ramona" stage following a rehearsal.
NEWS
November 22, 1994
Lloyd D. Mitchell, 92, Southern California manager of the California Centennial Commission. Mitchell supervised several observances, including a traveling museum of two buses that carried historic documents and artifacts during the centennial celebration years of 1948-50. He also produced "The California Story," a Hollywood Bowl pageant that served as the finale for the statewide extravaganza.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|