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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2000
One of the respondents to your poll regarding the Rampart situation stated that he just didn't know how this could happen ("Rampart Revelations Upset City Residents, Undercut Confidence," April 9). I can't help wondering if maybe that sentiment isn't indicative of the real problem. It seems that until we, the public, shake the naive notion mercilessly promoted by the LAPD that police officers are the good guys and acknowledge that the ranks of any police force are formed from a very imperfect talent pool, we may never take the necessary steps to ensure that there are real checks and balances in place to protect us from the bad judgment and sometimes evil actions that any human being might be capable of. DONALD BARNAT Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
The top commander in the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart station has been removed from his post after being arrested on suspicion of drunk driving, police said. Captain Steve Ruiz, a 25-year veteran of the LAPD, was arrested by a California Highway Patrol officer shortly before 1:30 a.m. May 30, according to CHP Officer Saul Gomez. The arrest occurred just off of the 101 Freeway at Woodman Avenue in Sherman Oaks, said Gomez, who would not provide any details about the circumstances that led the officer to stop Ruiz.
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BUSINESS
November 10, 2010 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
In the late 1990s, the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart Division was caught up in the worst corruption scandal in the department's history. It didn't take long for Hollywood to mine the subject matter. The scandal, in which dozens of officers in Rampart's anti-gang unit were accused of serious misconduct, including perjury and evidence tampering, heavily influenced the FX TV series "The Shield" and the 2001 movie "Training Day," starring Denzel Washington and Ethan Hawke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The federal judge who oversaw a dramatic, forced transformation of the Los Angeles Police Department has freed the department from the final vestiges of federal oversight. In a brief, three-line order Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Gary Feess formally lifted the binding agreement the U.S. Department of Justice imposed on the LAPD in 2001, which spelled out dozens of major reforms the police agency had to implement and frequent audits it was required to undergo by a monitor who reported to Feess.
OPINION
October 1, 2000
Re "Suit Says Chief Blocked Early Rampart Probe," Sept. 27: Now we learn that Chief Bernard Parks stopped an early investigation of the Rampart scandal and destroyed the career of an elite detective. What was Parks trying to hide? Parks ought to resign immediately. If not, the City Council ought to make his ouster its primary objective. Parks is the problem, or at least one of the primary ones, at the LAPD. Los Angeles will have a decent police force only when Angelenos demand an end to the corruption and brutality that envelop the LAPD.
OPINION
July 16, 2006
Re "LAPD Still at Risk of Scandal Despite Reform, Panel Says," July 12 The Blue Ribbon Rampart Review Panel got it half right. Of course the Los Angeles Police Department needs more officers. Every police department can do a better job with more officers. It is the tone set by the leadership of the department, however, that makes the real difference in whether a "warrior policing" mentality is condoned and tolerated or deemed to be not acceptable. A community-based policing philosophy applied across the city, no matter what neighborhood, instead of the end-justifies-the-means approach is what is required to rid the department of corrupt behavior by the officers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Few words in the lexicon of contemporary Los Angeles come invested with as much back story and bad mojo as "Rampart. " The 1990s police corruption scandal that saw some 70 officers implicated in criminal activity remains one of the most widespread instances of documented misconduct in American history. But the new film "Rampart," which opens in Los Angeles on Wednesday for a one-week run before a broader release in January, does not attempt to fully address the scandal. Rather, director and co-writer Oren Moverman uses it as a backdrop for his portrait of corrupt cop Dave Brown (Woody Harrelson)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2003 | Matt Lait and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
Although top LAPD officials have long maintained that the corruption they found in Rampart did not spill over to other divisions in the department, confidential law enforcement documents and discipline records suggest similar problems in other divisions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2012 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
Woody Harrelson wants the windows down. "Do you mind if we go old style on this? I don't like air conditioning. " The journalist at the wheel of the Honda Accord jabs a button and the famous passenger gets a face full of Sunset Strip. Harrelson is used to breathing in paradise — he lives in Maui most of the time — but even West Hollywood tastes sweet when you feel like you're smothering. "Yeah," the 50-year-old star said, "that's better already. " It's understandable if Harrelson needs to remind himself to breath deeply right about now. A few months ago he was viewed as a likely Oscar and Golden Globe contender for playing an unhinged LAPD cop in the new drama "Rampart," but any chances he had for a nomination got lost in the mail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2000
The LAPD Rampart scandal: A good argument against the use of the death penalty. PRISCILLA NAUMAN Irvine
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2013 | Steve Lopez
If the penal code had a section on landscaping crimes, the Los Angeles Police Department would need a full-time squad to go after everyone responsible for the ongoing fiasco on its own property. It's been 3 1/2 years since the new headquarters opened at 1st and Spring streets, and the city is still trying to get the landscaping right, with planter boxes empty, dead palm trees still standing, a scrubby dirt garden near the memorial to fallen police officers and piles of soil and sand blighting the landscape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
Hector Gonzalez straps a five-string bass guitar over his belly inside a music studio on a dreary stretch of Monterey Park. He plays as a smooth, prerecorded tenor joins a funky accordion through his headphones. Trying to bite a bullet, or sometimes count to 10, For the sake of argument , let's just pretend, We both agree to disagree. Gonzalez is helping a silky-voiced old bandmate record a nostalgic-sounding soul album. But in a larger sense, the 59-year-old music producer is trying to keep alive a legacy he inherited 18 years ago. Gonzalez is the head of Rampart Records, which earned a measure of fame in the 1960s as the originator of the "West Coast Eastside Sound" - and whose founder dreamed of its becoming a Mexican American Motown.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2012 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Most likely, Woody Harrelson never knew what hit him. An announcement went up on Reddit.com on Feb. 3, purportedly posted by Harrelson himself but more likely posted by a Millennium Entertainment press hireling, indicating that Harrelson was promoting the studio's new film "Rampart" and would be showing up to take a shot at a new kind of online Q&A later that day. The setup might have been relatively alien to Harrelson and the "Rampart"...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2012 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
Woody Harrelson wants the windows down. "Do you mind if we go old style on this? I don't like air conditioning. " The journalist at the wheel of the Honda Accord jabs a button and the famous passenger gets a face full of Sunset Strip. Harrelson is used to breathing in paradise — he lives in Maui most of the time — but even West Hollywood tastes sweet when you feel like you're smothering. "Yeah," the 50-year-old star said, "that's better already. " It's understandable if Harrelson needs to remind himself to breath deeply right about now. A few months ago he was viewed as a likely Oscar and Golden Globe contender for playing an unhinged LAPD cop in the new drama "Rampart," but any chances he had for a nomination got lost in the mail.
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Lisa Rosen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
During award season, any role smaller than nomination-size tends to get overlooked. But sometimes those small roles do more than support the lead actors. Sometimes it takes just a few minutes of screen time to shock an audience, to illuminate years of the main character's life or, in some cases, to set the film's third act on its head. Here we talk to three such performers — at various stages in their careers — who all had a powerful effect on the films they inhabited and came away richer for it. ROBERT FORSTER: Scott Thorson, "The Descendants" For a small role that literally packs a punch, look no further than Robert Forster's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As the art director of the influential counterculture magazine Ramparts, artist Dugald Stermer had already left an imprint on popular culture when he was asked to update the design of the Olympic medals for the 1984 Games in Los Angeles. At their unveiling, Stermer recognized the historic reach of the project by saying he was delighted that "the medals will last a lot longer than I will. " Known for treasuring classic typography, he brought the same eye to the medallions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2000
LAPD anthem: "O'er the Rampart we should've watched." ALAN GUTTMAN San Pedro
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Yes, that's Woody Harrelson, one of Hollywood's true peace-and-love guys, playing misanthropic, murderous cop Dave Brown in "Rampart. " That his performance is so chillingly convincing, he credits largely to his reunion with "The Messenger" writer-director Oren Moverman. That he manages to evoke some shred of sympathy in the role, however, is all Harrelson. What was hard to reconcile in Dave? Some of the guy's behavior — when I read it, I just thought, "This is a terrible guy. " I just saw an … being a racist, not afraid to kill someone who doesn't necessarily deserve it — and the other thing is his strange behavior with his family.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Playing a cop at his worst, his hands never dirtier, the stakes never higher, Woody Harrelson has perhaps never been better than he is in the seamy, scandalous jumbled rumble of "Rampart. " Set in Los Angeles in 1999, the film captures a time when public trust in law enforcement was brought down by the exposure of police corruption in the Rampart precinct. Rather than take on the widespread malfeasance, director Oren Moverman, sharing writing credit with crime novelist James Ellroy, constructed a story around one very bad cop running rampant in Rampart.
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