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Rampart Scandal

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OPINION
April 8, 2001
Rafael Perez, Nino Durden and any others involved in the Rampart scandal--guilty by their own confessions--are getting off easy with plea-bargaining (April 3). These corrupt officers should be made to serve the sentences their actions imposed on the individuals they put behind bars. And the sentences should run consecutively rather than concurrently. It is a shame so many good officers must live with the current reputation of the Los Angeles Police Department due to the actions of these bad applies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The federal judge who oversaw a dramatic, forced transformation of the Los Angeles Police Department has freed the department from the final vestiges of federal oversight. In a brief, three-line order Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Gary Feess formally lifted the binding agreement the U.S. Department of Justice imposed on the LAPD in 2001, which spelled out dozens of major reforms the police agency had to implement and frequent audits it was required to undergo by a monitor who reported to Feess.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2000
For the past several months I have sat by quietly and listened to retired command staff, pundits, self-anointed police and civil rights experts, news reporters and now an L.A. Police Protective League director condemn the Los Angeles Police Department's investigation of the Rampart scandal and Chief Bernard Parks' efforts to correct the problems discovered during the investigation. The Internal Affairs Group started the investigation of the missing narcotics from the Property Division without intervention by the L.A. Police Protective League.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009 | Jack Leonard and Joel Rubin
Three Los Angeles police officers were charged with perjury and conspiracy Tuesday for allegedly lying under oath in a drug-possession case that was dismissed last year when a videotape sharply contradicted their testimony. The felony charges mark the most serious allegations of police perjury in Los Angeles since the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart scandal about a decade ago. Prosecutors allege in court documents that two officers falsely testified during the trial that they saw a suspect throw an object that split open to reveal crack and powder cocaine.
NEWS
March 16, 2000
About 200 people protesting the actions of the district attorney and Los Angeles Police Department officials in connection with the Rampart scandal gathered in front of the Criminal Courts Building on Wednesday and marched to Parker Center, where they continued the protest. The march to LAPD headquarters was organized by Campaign for Community Control of Police, a coalition of a dozen activist organizations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1999 | PATT MORRISON, Patt Morrison's column appears Fridays. Her e-mail address is patt.morrison@latimes.com
Pick a cliche that applies: reaping what's been sown, making your bed then lying in it, chickens coming home to roost. Home to the Rampart Division. Home to the LAPD. Home to the courtroom. Already, in the noxious wake of the Rampart bad-cop scandal, the L.A. city attorney's office is noting an uptick in acquittals and hung juries, a few more jurors telling prosecutors they just didn't believe the cops in the witness box.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
Rafael Perez, the disgraced officer at the center of the LAPD Rampart corruption scandal, was sentenced to three years' probation Thursday for lying on a driver's license application. Perez, 39, pleaded no contest in October to using the name Ray Perez on a June 2005 license form. Perez, who has changed his name to Ray Lopez, must also perform 300 hours of community service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000
A drug conviction thrown out Tuesday by a court commissioner was the 91st criminal case to be overturned on the basis of information obtained in the investigation into the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart corruption scandal. Superior Court Commissioner Michael G. Price dismissed the conviction of Porfirio Acosta, 41, who was arrested by then-LAPD Officer Rafael Perez in July 1997 on suspicion of possession of marijuana for sale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2000 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Where Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks is seeing red over the Rampart scandal, others are seeing green. A Web site called LAPDgear.com is attempting to capitalize on the scandal. Among the LAPD paraphernalia it offers for sale are T-shirts bearing the Rampart CRASH unit's controversial emblem. "Finally available: The highly publicized 'Aces and Eights' logo from the Rampart CRASH Unit," reads the caption below one T-shirt retailing for $16.95.
OPINION
August 11, 2009
Re "Like a chief in the night," Opinion, Aug. 7 Tim Rutten writes of a pre-William J. Bratton "scandal-ridden" Los Angeles Police Department as if this were a fact. It is not true, and I have resented it each time Rutten and other reporters over the years have written this lie. I retired from the LAPD in 1986, and when I left, it was top-notch, in my opinion. Over the years since I left, I saw nothing that indicated the department had gone downhill. Yes, there was the Rampart scandal (which was dealt with)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2009 | Joel Rubin
Declaring that the Los Angeles Police Department has reformed itself significantly after decades of corruption and brutality complaints, a U.S. judge on Friday ended a long-running period of federal oversight. U.S. District Court Judge Gary A. Feess terminated the consent decree federal officials had imposed on the LAPD in 2001, after the Rampart corruption scandal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2009 | Andrew Blankstein
The Los Angeles Police Department's effort to end a federal consent decree imposed in the wake of the Rampart scandal got a boost Friday when the independent monitor overseeing the department said the decree should end. LAPD Chief William J. Bratton is hoping that a federal judge on Monday will end the decree, which calls for federal oversight of department operations. The decree was enacted in 2001 in the wake of a scandal in which LAPD officers were accused of misconduct, including framing suspects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2008 | Jack Leonard
A Los Angeles County prosecutor who alleged he was the victim of discrimination and harassment at work because of his sexual orientation will receive a $325,000 settlement in a lawsuit against the county. Deputy Dist. Atty. Michael Kraut alleged that some colleagues targeted him with anti-gay jokes and other comments, and that the district attorney's office retaliated against him when he complained by transferring him to its welfare fraud section. The county denied the allegations and said in court records that supervisors concluded Kraut had harassed other prosecutors in the office.
OPINION
June 9, 2007
Re "The Times (heart) Bratton," Opinion, June 3 Former Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks stated that Duke University law professor Erwin Chemerinsky "was hired by the police union to write a report on the Rampart scandal" as a means to discredit his critics' objectivity. In fact, then-Police Protective League President Ted Hunt and I asked then-USC Law School professor Chemerinsky if he would provide an independent analysis of the Rampart Board of Inquiry report issued by then-Chief Parks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2007 | J. Michael Kennedy, Times Staff Writer
The family of slain rap star Notorious B.I.G. has filed a lawsuit alleging that Los Angeles police officers closely connected to the Rampart corruption scandal were involved in his 1997 killing. The suit, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court on Monday, alleges that former Officers Raphael Perez and Nino Durden were involved in the shooting, which took place as Notorious B.I.G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
Rafael Perez, the disgraced officer at the center of the LAPD Rampart corruption scandal, was sentenced to three years' probation Thursday for lying on a driver's license application. Perez, 39, pleaded no contest in October to using the name Ray Perez on a June 2005 license form. Perez, who has changed his name to Ray Lopez, must also perform 300 hours of community service.
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