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Ramsey Clark

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NEWS
February 4, 1991
WHO: U.S. attorney general under President Lyndon B. Johnson; now lawyer and peace activist. AGE: 63, born in Dallas EDUCATION: History degree, University of Texas; history and law degrees, University of Chicago. Served in the Marines. BACKGROUND: Has made several peace missions to the Middle East, including a visit last year to Baghdad.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
November 28, 2005 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
A prominent American antiwar activist arrived here Sunday to assist the defense team of Saddam Hussein when his trial resumes today, as reports surfaced of a plot to assassinate a top tribunal official. Ramsey Clark, a former U.S. attorney general, was accompanied by Najib Nuaimi, a former Qatari justice minister. "Our plan is to go to court in Baghdad on Monday morning representing defense counsel as defense support," Clark told reporters before departing from Amman, Jordan.
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NEWS
November 28, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Former U.S. Atty. Gen. Ramsey Clark said today he hopes to travel to El Salvador on Wednesday to represent an American woman who was detained after police discovered a large stash of arms under her house. Clark, who served under former President Lyndon B. Johnson, said he had been retained by the mother of Jennifer Casolo, a 28-year old church worker, and Christian Educational Seminars, the group she works for.
OPINION
January 26, 2005
Re "Why I'm Willing to Defend Hussein," Commentary, Jan. 24: Ramsey Clark has injected himself into the defense of Saddam Hussein. I wonder if Hussein has been nuts enough to accept this offer of assistance. Clark's article reveals the same tired and virulent anti-Americanism he has harbored for decades. He is the Ezra Pound of the left. William Davis Yorba Linda In explaining his reasons for wanting to defend Hussein, Clark states, "That Hussein and other former Iraqi officials must have lawyers of their choice to assist them in defending against the criminal charges brought against them ought to be self-evident among a people committed to truth, justice and the rule of law," and that "No power, or person, can be above the law."
NEWS
March 25, 1987 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
Former U.S. Atty. Gen. Ramsey Clark was canceled as main speaker at an April 6 Jewish Federation Council fund-raising dinner at the Century Plaza after complaints that Clark has been representing both Palestinians and a Nazi war crimes suspect in court, the dinner chairman said Tuesday. Donald Etra said the invitation to Clark was withdrawn Friday because "many people in the community felt that some of the people he was representing did not represent the feeling of the Jewish community."
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former U.S. Atty. Gen. Ramsey Clark met Saturday with a jailed American pacifist and said she will plead not guilty to Salvadoran government charges of illegal possession of a guerrilla arms cache. "I believe she is innocent," Clark said after a meeting lasting almost three hours at National Police headquarters with Jennifer Jean Casolo, who has been held there since a police raid on her rented house in the capital a week ago.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Former U.S. Atty. Gen. Ramsey Clark met Monday with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, who told Clark he hopes there will be no showdown with the United States, the official Iraqi News Agency said. Clark said he came to Baghdad for three days to learn Iraq's position and to help win the release of hostages. It was the first visit by a recognized U.S. figure since the Rev. Jesse Jackson came here in August.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2003 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
A month before the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, Saddam Hussein welcomed an old acquaintance. Over coffee, tea and sweets in one of his ornate offices in Baghdad, Hussein sat down for a long chat with Ramsey Clark, former attorney general of the United States. Few American visitors, if any, spent as much time with Hussein over the last decade as Clark.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a man who hasn't owned a car in 17 years, doesn't watch television and still wears bell-bottom pants, Ramsey Clark has always managed to keep up with the times. "I guess you could say I've been involved in a couple of things that made news," says the former U.S. attorney general in a slow, Southern drawl. "Sure, there have been some stories."
NEWS
March 2, 1990
It's too bad Benedict Arnold isn't alive so you could do a real puff piece on a traitor. Actually, however, old Benedict didn't stoop to the degraded level of your hero, Ramsey Clark, to whom View devoted a Page 1, four-color love letter. Despite the publicity given to Jane Fonda's embrace of the Communist Viet Cong and her taunting of sick, wounded and starving U.S. prisoners of the North Vietnamese Reds, the American POWs ignored her as a brainless Hollywood airhead, Barbarella over the hill.
OPINION
January 24, 2005 | Ramsey Clark, Ramsey Clark was attorney general under President Lyndon B. Johnson.
Late last month, I traveled to Amman, Jordan, and met with the family and lawyers of former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. I told them that I would help in his defense in any way I could. The news, when it found its way back to the United States, caused something of a stir. A few news reports were inquisitive -- and some were skeptical -- but most were simply dismissive or derogatory. "There goes Ramsey Clark again," they seemed to say. "Isn't it a shame?
OPINION
April 29, 2003
Re "He's the Ultimate Outsider," April 26: Ramsey Clark has hardly "forfeited a last chance to make a difference." In 1991, after Gulf War I, he founded the International Action Center so the peace movement would have a permanent home. After 9/11, IAC and others formed the ANSWER coalition, the biggest and most active of the antiwar coalitions, which has organized numerous huge peace rallies nationwide. I'd say he was making quite a difference. Bob Morris Encino Clark's views on U.S. foreign policy are cogent and shared by many outside the mainstream.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2003 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
A month before the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, Saddam Hussein welcomed an old acquaintance. Over coffee, tea and sweets in one of his ornate offices in Baghdad, Hussein sat down for a long chat with Ramsey Clark, former attorney general of the United States. Few American visitors, if any, spent as much time with Hussein over the last decade as Clark.
BOOKS
November 22, 1992 | ALEX RAKSIN
THE FIRE THIS TIME: U.S. War Crimes in the Gulf by Ramsey Clark (Thunder's Mouth: $21.95; 325 pp.). THE PERSIAN GULF TV WAR by Douglas Kellner (Westview: $19.95; 460 pp.) While Ramsey Clark would like to deprive us of the military victory we have hungered for since World War II, he is not easy to dismiss. Hardly a knee-jerk activist who decided early on that Establishment politicians were evil, he was U.S.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Optimism about the Mideast peace conference that begins in Madrid this week, and calls for U.S. officials to put pressure on Israel, marked a weekend banquet in Orange County of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee. An overflow crowd of 700 gave standing ovations to Queen Noor, the American-born wife of Jordan's King Hussein, and to former U.S. Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran Los Angeles police detective delivered a scathing and unusual public condemnation of Police Chief Daryl F. Gates on Saturday at an unofficial tribunal examining law enforcement abuses, accusing Gates and other top police officials of obstruction of justice, cronyism and mismanagement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1991 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former U.S. Atty. Gen. Ramsey Clark will head an "alternative grand jury" on police crime in Los Angeles that will examine allegations of misconduct in the LAPD and the Sheriff's Department, it was disclosed Tuesday.
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The desert sun broke through cloudy skies over the Persian Gulf on Monday, opening a devastating window through which allied air forces rained bombs on Iraq and occupied Kuwait with intensified ferocity, military officials said. Pilots flying F-16 fighter-bombers against Iraqi positions said they were still seeing hundreds of military targets, indicating that a great deal more softening up is needed before ground troops from the multinational force launch an assault against dug-in Iraqi troops.
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