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Ramzan Kadyrov

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WORLD
October 7, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
A Moscow court handed a moral victory to Chechen strongman Ramzan Kadyrov today, ruling that the head of one of Russia's most respected human rights organizations had smeared his reputation. Oleg Orlov, chair of Memorial rights group, was ordered to pay Kadyrov about $2,300 in damages for blaming him for the shooting death of a Chechnya-based colleague. Orlov was also ordered to retract his statement. The lawsuit stemmed from this summer's death of Memorial's Chechnya-based rights activist, Natalya Estemirova, who had been one of the few remaining voices willing to speak about repression, murder and disappearances in Kadyrov's Chechnya.
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WORLD
October 7, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
A Moscow court handed a moral victory to Chechen strongman Ramzan Kadyrov today, ruling that the head of one of Russia's most respected human rights organizations had smeared his reputation. Oleg Orlov, chair of Memorial rights group, was ordered to pay Kadyrov about $2,300 in damages for blaming him for the shooting death of a Chechnya-based colleague. Orlov was also ordered to retract his statement. The lawsuit stemmed from this summer's death of Memorial's Chechnya-based rights activist, Natalya Estemirova, who had been one of the few remaining voices willing to speak about repression, murder and disappearances in Kadyrov's Chechnya.
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WORLD
March 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
President Vladimir V. Putin on Thursday gave power in Chechnya to widely feared pro-Russia strongman Ramzan Kadyrov, even as Europe's human rights chief noted allegations of torture and other abuses by Kadyrov's henchmen. Kadyrov, son of an assassinated Chechen president, previously served as prime minister and had been expected to seek the presidency after reaching the minimum age of 30 in October.
OPINION
July 17, 2009
For years, Natalia Estemirova documented Chechnya's political murders, kidnappings and other vile human rights abuses committed without fear of repercussions. She did so after journalist Anna Politkovskaya was slain in 2006, apparently for documenting atrocities in the Russian republic, and after human rights lawyer Stanislav Markelov was killed earlier this year.
WORLD
June 17, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
'I'm going to make them scream." The president of Chechnya looks out at the menagerie of birds, floating on the murky man-made lake in his backyard: black swans, pelicans and ducks. Ostriches roam the opposite bank. Deep grunts of laughter shake his thick chest, jolting his barrel arms. Then Ramzan Kadyrov stops laughing. "Bring me the tiger!" he barks to his camouflage-clad servants. "Bring me bread!" Two former guerrilla fighters wrestle a chained tiger down the muddy slope.
OPINION
July 17, 2009
For years, Natalia Estemirova documented Chechnya's political murders, kidnappings and other vile human rights abuses committed without fear of repercussions. She did so after journalist Anna Politkovskaya was slain in 2006, apparently for documenting atrocities in the Russian republic, and after human rights lawyer Stanislav Markelov was killed earlier this year.
WORLD
April 17, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Russia on Thursday declared an end to its counter-terrorism operation in largely pacified Chechnya, lifting security restrictions that remained from a decade-old war that leveled towns and led to the death and disappearance of untold tens of thousands. The announcement bolsters Moscow's strategy for normalizing life in the restive republic by transferring control to ironfisted Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov, a onetime rebel fighter who has switched allegiance to the Kremlin.
WORLD
August 30, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
About 50 militants surrendered and handed over their weapons in a ceremony led by Chechnya's prime minister, who said rebel numbers were dwindling in the war-ravaged region, officials said. The ceremony in Chechnya's second-largest city, Gudermes, was the latest step in a campaign by Moscow-backed Chechen Prime Minister Ramzan Kadyrov to cast himself as a leader bringing peace to the republic after a separatist conflict that began in 1994.
WORLD
November 9, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Chechen security forces killed 22 separatist rebels, including the alleged organizer of the assassination of the republic's president, a top Chechen official was quoted as saying. In an Itar-Tass report, Chechen Deputy Prime Minister Ramzan Kadyrov said the rebels were killed about 30 miles southeast of Grozny, the capital. Kadyrov is the son of assassinated Chechen leader Akhmad Kadyrov. The victims reportedly included Suleiman Khairulla, the self-proclaimed organizer of the assassination.
WORLD
July 28, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A female suicide bomber blew herself up near a base of a security force commanded by the son of Chechnya's Kremlin-appointed administration chief, wounding a woman who was nearby, officials said. Chechnya's emergency situations minister, Ruslan Avtayev, said the attack appeared to be aimed at Ramzan Kadyrov, son of Akhmad Kadyrov, the head of the administration.
WORLD
April 17, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Russia on Thursday declared an end to its counter-terrorism operation in largely pacified Chechnya, lifting security restrictions that remained from a decade-old war that leveled towns and led to the death and disappearance of untold tens of thousands. The announcement bolsters Moscow's strategy for normalizing life in the restive republic by transferring control to ironfisted Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov, a onetime rebel fighter who has switched allegiance to the Kremlin.
WORLD
June 17, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
'I'm going to make them scream." The president of Chechnya looks out at the menagerie of birds, floating on the murky man-made lake in his backyard: black swans, pelicans and ducks. Ostriches roam the opposite bank. Deep grunts of laughter shake his thick chest, jolting his barrel arms. Then Ramzan Kadyrov stops laughing. "Bring me the tiger!" he barks to his camouflage-clad servants. "Bring me bread!" Two former guerrilla fighters wrestle a chained tiger down the muddy slope.
WORLD
March 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
President Vladimir V. Putin on Thursday gave power in Chechnya to widely feared pro-Russia strongman Ramzan Kadyrov, even as Europe's human rights chief noted allegations of torture and other abuses by Kadyrov's henchmen. Kadyrov, son of an assassinated Chechen president, previously served as prime minister and had been expected to seek the presidency after reaching the minimum age of 30 in October.
WORLD
November 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The president of Chechnya has called for all women to cover their heads with scarves, the latest in a series of his unofficial orders toughening social customs for women in the mainly Muslim Russian region. The recommendation by President Ramzan Kadyrov during a TV address last week was not a legally binding order.
WORLD
April 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
About 18 people have died in one of the biggest battles between rival pro-Kremlin factions in the restive Russian republic of Chechnya, a witness said. Russia has fought two wars against Chechen insurgents since 1994, but over the last few years has ceded local power to former enemy warlords and their fighters. The Kremlin has retrained and equipped thousands of former rebels, but tensions between the different forces remain high. On Monday, soldiers loyal to Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov clashed with forces supporting former rebel commander Sulim Yamadayev in the town of Gudermes.
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