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Ramzi Ahmed Yousef

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NEWS
April 14, 1995 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, the alleged mastermind of the 1993 terrorist attack on New York's World Trade Center, was charged Thursday in a new indictment with planning to blow up U.S. airliners in the Far East and with exploding a bomb aboard a Philippine Airlines plane that killed a passenger last December. Also named with Yousef in the new indictment was Abdul Hakim Murad, who shared an apartment in Manila with Yousef.
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NATIONAL
August 11, 2006 | Terry McDermott, Times Staff Writer
The airline bombing plot that British officials said they disrupted Thursday bears striking similarities to a 1995 plot hatched by Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and his nephew, Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, in the Philippines.
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NEWS
May 31, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring a federal judge's stern warning that he risked "making a fool" of himself, Ramzi Ahmed Yousef became his own lawyer Thursday, telling jurors he could not have participated in an alleged terrorist plot to down a dozen American-owned jumbo jets over the Pacific last year because he was secretly imprisoned at the time in Pakistan.
OPINION
September 16, 2001 | JOHN V. PARACHINI, John V. Parachini is a policy analyst in the Washington office of Rand. The views expressed here are his own
What would motivate anyone to crash airplanes into buildings with thousands of people inside? Attributing religious motivations to the 50 or so people federal authorities report may have been involved in this operation is too simplistic. Similarly, describing the attackers as crazy does not appreciate the character of their twisted logic. They operated according to a way of thinking that we neither approve nor fully understand, but it made sense to them.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an extraordinary courtroom confrontation during which a judge labeled him "an apostle of evil" and Ramzi Ahmed Yousef proclaimed, "I am a terrorist and I am proud of it," the architect of the World Trade Center bombing was sentenced Thursday to life plus 240 years in prison. U.S. District Judge Kevin T. Duffy also recommended that Yousef be kept in constant solitary confinement, limited to visits with his lawyer.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When FBI agents brought Ramzi Ahmed Yousef to New York City after his dramatic capture in Pakistan in February 1995, they deliberately flew him over the World Trade Center, which he had allegedly plotted to bomb two years earlier. "You see, it's still standing," one agent pointedly boasted, according to a story making the rounds among law enforcement officials. "But it wouldn't be," Yousef reportedly responded, "if I'd had better help."
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The investigation into the crash of TWA Flight 800 will look at those who may have learned terrorist techniques from Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, who was convicted of plotting to blow up U.S. jetliners, the lead FBI investigator said. "We are naturally concerned about any other co-conspirators Yousef may have, if any, that would conduct such cowardly acts of terrorism against innocent people," Assistant FBI Director James K. Kallstrom said.
NEWS
May 14, 1996 | From Reuters
Jury selection began Monday in the trial of Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, the alleged mastermind of the World Trade Center bombing, and two other men accused of taking part in a scheme to blow up U.S. jets in Asia. Yousef and co-defendants Abdul Hakim Murad and Wali Khan Amin Shah are charged with conspiracy to blow up U.S. airplanes. Yousef is also charged with placing a bomb on board a Philippine Airlines plane Dec. 11, 1994, that was flying from Manila to Toyko.
NEWS
August 5, 1997 | From Associated Press
A judge pressed ahead with the trial of the alleged mastermind of the World Trade Center bombing after the jurors assured him Monday that an apparent suicide bombing plot discovered in Brooklyn just days ago would not affect their judgment. Opening arguments in the trial of Ramzi Ahmed Yousef and a co-defendant were postponed until today because one juror called in sick. U.S. District Judge Kevin T.
NEWS
August 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
The alleged mastermind of the World Trade Center bombing went on trial Tuesday, with a prosecutor saying the defendant wanted to topple the twin towers to "send a message to Americans that they were at war." Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, an electrical engineer of uncertain nationality, is accused of mixing the bomb and organizing the Feb. 26, 1993, attack that killed six people, injured more than 1,000 and caused $500 million damage. The attack was intended as a blow against U.S. support of Israel.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an extraordinary courtroom confrontation during which a judge labeled him "an apostle of evil" and Ramzi Ahmed Yousef proclaimed, "I am a terrorist and I am proud of it," the architect of the World Trade Center bombing was sentenced Thursday to life plus 240 years in prison. U.S. District Judge Kevin T. Duffy also recommended that Yousef be kept in constant solitary confinement, limited to visits with his lawyer.
NEWS
November 13, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury in Manhattan on Wednesday found Ramzi Ahmed Yousef guilty of masterminding the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center and convicted a co-defendant on charges that he drove an explosives-laden van into the basement garage of the complex.
NEWS
November 13, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury in Manhattan on Wednesday found Ramzi Ahmed Yousef guilty of masterminding the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center and convicted a co-defendant on charges that he drove an explosives-laden van into the basement garage of the complex.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
Survivors of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing began to take the witness stand Wednesday, with the first one describing how the force of the blast lifted him off his feet and how the darkness that followed made him fear that he had gone blind. "I crawled into the fetal position and began to pray," Timothy Lang testified. Lang's testimony came on the second day of the trial of Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, accused of masterminding the bombing, and co-defendant Eyad Ismoil.
NEWS
August 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
The alleged mastermind of the World Trade Center bombing went on trial Tuesday, with a prosecutor saying the defendant wanted to topple the twin towers to "send a message to Americans that they were at war." Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, an electrical engineer of uncertain nationality, is accused of mixing the bomb and organizing the Feb. 26, 1993, attack that killed six people, injured more than 1,000 and caused $500 million damage. The attack was intended as a blow against U.S. support of Israel.
NEWS
August 5, 1997 | From Associated Press
A judge pressed ahead with the trial of the alleged mastermind of the World Trade Center bombing after the jurors assured him Monday that an apparent suicide bombing plot discovered in Brooklyn just days ago would not affect their judgment. Opening arguments in the trial of Ramzi Ahmed Yousef and a co-defendant were postponed until today because one juror called in sick. U.S. District Judge Kevin T.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
Survivors of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing began to take the witness stand Wednesday, with the first one describing how the force of the blast lifted him off his feet and how the darkness that followed made him fear that he had gone blind. "I crawled into the fetal position and began to pray," Timothy Lang testified. Lang's testimony came on the second day of the trial of Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, accused of masterminding the bombing, and co-defendant Eyad Ismoil.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto said Saturday that the accused mastermind of the World Trade Center bombing also had plotted to murder her but that the bomb went off prematurely, injuring him instead. "I want you to know that we have now found out that Mr. Ramzi (Ahmed) Yousef was sent here in Karachi in 1993 to assassinate me," Bhutto told the Reuters news agency.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The investigation into the crash of TWA Flight 800 will look at those who may have learned terrorist techniques from Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, who was convicted of plotting to blow up U.S. jetliners, the lead FBI investigator said. "We are naturally concerned about any other co-conspirators Yousef may have, if any, that would conduct such cowardly acts of terrorism against innocent people," Assistant FBI Director James K. Kallstrom said.
NEWS
September 6, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury on Thursday found Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, the alleged mastermind of the World Trade Center bombing, and two co-defendants guilty of plotting to blow up a dozen U.S. jetliners during 48 hours of terror over the Pacific Ocean. More than 4,000 people aboard the planes could have been killed had the 1995 plan succeeded, prosecutors told the jury of seven men and five women.
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