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Ramzi Binalshibh

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November 20, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
For the first time, defense lawyers have been allowed to see a section of the Guantanamo prison that is so restricted, even its location on the U.S. base is secret. Two military lawyers for Ramzi Binalshibh, an alleged plotter of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, were granted 90 minutes to view Camp 7, a section for "high value" detainees that has been shrouded in mystery since it opened two years ago. The attorneys are trying to determine if their client is competent to stand trial and to gauge the effects of the prison-within-a-prison on a man who, according to documents, believes that his bed shakes and that noxious odors are pumped into his cell.
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NATIONAL
October 15, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - The U.S. Army judge who will try Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four other top Al Qaeda terror operatives ruled Monday that the defendants cannot be forced to attend the legal proceedings, striking a significant blow to the government's position that they must be in the courtroom as prosecutors seek their deaths in the Sept. 11 terror attacks. The decision by Judge James Pohl came after Mohammed and his comrades sat quietly during the opening of a new round of pre-trial hearings, in stark contrast to their courtroom protests in May during their arraignment at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
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WORLD
January 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
Spanish Judge Baltasar Garzon indicted eight people on terrorism charges Monday, saying they provided logistical help and false documents to suspects in the Sept. 11 attacks. The indictment by Spain's leading terrorism investigator said suspects aided by the eight included Ramzi Binalshibh, an alleged Sept. 11 plotter who has been in U.S. custody since his 2002 capture in Pakistan.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
For the first time, defense lawyers have been allowed to see a section of the Guantanamo prison that is so restricted, even its location on the U.S. base is secret. Two military lawyers for Ramzi Binalshibh, an alleged plotter of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, were granted 90 minutes to view Camp 7, a section for "high value" detainees that has been shrouded in mystery since it opened two years ago. The attorneys are trying to determine if their client is competent to stand trial and to gauge the effects of the prison-within-a-prison on a man who, according to documents, believes that his bed shakes and that noxious odors are pumped into his cell.
WORLD
September 16, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and SHAMIM UR-REHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Signs mounted Sunday that Ramzi Binalshibh, the man believed to have been the lead coordinator of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, will be extradited to the U.S. to face charges for those crimes. Official sources in this port city said Binalshibh and other suspected Al Qaeda terrorists, who were captured by police in a series of raids here Tuesday and Wednesday, were being interviewed in a military containment area.
WORLD
September 19, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The building is a plain white concrete box on a commercial street in the part of the city known as the Defense Section. The only ornamental touch is the gray-tile facing on the corners. A more nondescript setting in a more undistinguished area of this densely packed metropolis is hard to imagine. It was here that Pakistani authorities tracked down one of the world's most wanted men: Ramzi Binalshibh, the Yemeni who allegedly sent money to the 19 hijackers who attacked the United States on Sept.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - The U.S. Army judge who will try Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four other top Al Qaeda terror operatives ruled Monday that the defendants cannot be forced to attend the legal proceedings, striking a significant blow to the government's position that they must be in the courtroom as prosecutors seek their deaths in the Sept. 11 terror attacks. The decision by Judge James Pohl came after Mohammed and his comrades sat quietly during the opening of a new round of pre-trial hearings, in stark contrast to their courtroom protests in May during their arraignment at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
A military judge Monday enlisted the help of self-described Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed in coaxing a man accused as a co-conspirator out of his detention cell here so the controversial trial into the attacks on New York and Washington can proceed. After a long day of procedural wrangling, Marine Col. Ralph H. Kohlmann ordered Ramzi Binalshibh to be "extracted" from his cell by force if necessary and brought into the military commission courtroom at the U.S.
WORLD
September 15, 2002 | PAUL WATSON and SHAMIM UR-REHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
U.S. agents tracked a call on a portable satellite phone to find alleged Al Qaeda member Ramzi Binalshibh, a lead suspect in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, official Pakistani sources said Saturday. FBI agents and officers of Pakistan's military intelligence agency, Inter-Services Intelligence, were interrogating Binalshibh on Saturday at a secret location in Pakistan, the sources said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
WORLD
October 24, 2002 | Terry McDermott and Dirk Laabs Special to The Times, Special to The Times
HAMBURG, Germany -- Ramzi Binalshibh, a young, apparently rootless drifter from Yemen, was described in court testimony Wednesday as a man who seemed to be in the middle of everything the members of Hamburg's Sept. 11 terrorist cell did. Binalshibh, who was captured last month in Pakistan and is in U.S. custody, has emerged in recent months as a central figure in the Hamburg cell that produced three of the suicide pilots for the Sept.11 attacks on New York and the Pentagon.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
A military judge Monday enlisted the help of self-described Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed in coaxing a man accused as a co-conspirator out of his detention cell here so the controversial trial into the attacks on New York and Washington can proceed. After a long day of procedural wrangling, Marine Col. Ralph H. Kohlmann ordered Ramzi Binalshibh to be "extracted" from his cell by force if necessary and brought into the military commission courtroom at the U.S.
WORLD
January 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
Spanish Judge Baltasar Garzon indicted eight people on terrorism charges Monday, saying they provided logistical help and false documents to suspects in the Sept. 11 attacks. The indictment by Spain's leading terrorism investigator said suspects aided by the eight included Ramzi Binalshibh, an alleged Sept. 11 plotter who has been in U.S. custody since his 2002 capture in Pakistan.
WORLD
October 24, 2002 | Terry McDermott and Dirk Laabs Special to The Times, Special to The Times
HAMBURG, Germany -- Ramzi Binalshibh, a young, apparently rootless drifter from Yemen, was described in court testimony Wednesday as a man who seemed to be in the middle of everything the members of Hamburg's Sept. 11 terrorist cell did. Binalshibh, who was captured last month in Pakistan and is in U.S. custody, has emerged in recent months as a central figure in the Hamburg cell that produced three of the suicide pilots for the Sept.11 attacks on New York and the Pentagon.
WORLD
September 19, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The building is a plain white concrete box on a commercial street in the part of the city known as the Defense Section. The only ornamental touch is the gray-tile facing on the corners. A more nondescript setting in a more undistinguished area of this densely packed metropolis is hard to imagine. It was here that Pakistani authorities tracked down one of the world's most wanted men: Ramzi Binalshibh, the Yemeni who allegedly sent money to the 19 hijackers who attacked the United States on Sept.
WORLD
September 16, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and SHAMIM UR-REHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Signs mounted Sunday that Ramzi Binalshibh, the man believed to have been the lead coordinator of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, will be extradited to the U.S. to face charges for those crimes. Official sources in this port city said Binalshibh and other suspected Al Qaeda terrorists, who were captured by police in a series of raids here Tuesday and Wednesday, were being interviewed in a military containment area.
WORLD
September 15, 2002 | PAUL WATSON and SHAMIM UR-REHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
U.S. agents tracked a call on a portable satellite phone to find alleged Al Qaeda member Ramzi Binalshibh, a lead suspect in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, official Pakistani sources said Saturday. FBI agents and officers of Pakistan's military intelligence agency, Inter-Services Intelligence, were interrogating Binalshibh on Saturday at a secret location in Pakistan, the sources said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
WORLD
November 20, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Justice Department has refused to allow two suspects in the Sept. 11 hijackings, Ramzi Binalshibh and Zacarias Moussaoui, to testify at the trial of an alleged member of the German cell that led the attacks. Mounir Motassadeq is facing more than 3,000 counts of accessory to murder for his alleged supporting role in the attacks and had requested Binalshibh's testimony. The court itself had requested the appearance of Moussaoui, the so-called 20th hijacker, who is facing charges in a U.S.
WORLD
April 26, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A Lebanese gunman demanding the release of a Sept. 11 suspect in U.S. custody hijacked a bus in Bremen, Germany, taking 16 hostages and leading police on a highway chase. No one was injured in the ordeal, which ended when police stormed the bus and captured the 17-year-old hijacker, who had a pistol that fires blanks and claimed to have explosives, police said. The hijacker demanded the release of four prisoners, including Ramzi Binalshibh, one of the Hamburg-based Sept.
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