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BUSINESS
May 30, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- The state Assembly passed and sent the Senate a bill aimed at protecting immigrant workers, who complain about pay and working conditions. The measure, AB 263 by Assemblyman Roger Hernandez, passed on a 52-22 vote on Thursday. 'Better burger' chains beef up Hernandez said the legislation is needed to prevent bosses from threatening or actually calling federal agents after a worker, who entered the country illegally, has filed a complaint. "Those that are greatly affected come from the most vulnerable sectors, such as in agriculture, construction, manufacturing and service industries," he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Militant Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy on Friday apologized for his comments published this week on African Americans and slavery but refused to back off from his intended point that the federal government was too powerful, saying that his remarks came “from the heart.” In a daily news conference from his ranch in Bunkerville, north of Las Vegas, the 67-year-old rancher, who is in a prolonged battle with federal officials over grazing rights...
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NATIONAL
December 14, 2009 | By DeeDee Correll
Manuel A. Sanchez has ruled out every logical explanation for the fate that has befallen the calves on his ranch in southern Colorado. Over the past month, he's found four calves dead in a way that he cannot reconcile with anything in his 50 years of raising cattle: eyes and ears missing, tongues and genitals excised in what appeared to be a series of fine cuts. Mountain lions, bears or coyotes would leave messier marks, he said. And Sanchez found no tire tracks or footprints that would suggest a human invader -- nor even bloodstains he'd expect to find around the carcasses if someone had butchered them.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy is being portrayed by some as a man of principle, an iconoclast who should be admired for his willingness to stand up to the federal government. But in fact he's a petty scofflaw who seems to think that he has the right to pick and choose which rules must be obeyed. Bundy is the cattleman who grazes his herd on federal land operated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, but unlike more than 15,000 other ranchers, he refuses to pay the associated grazing fees.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON--The Obama administration has selected the locations for seven new regional centers that will help farmers and ranchers adjust to the increasing risks and extreme weather associated with climate change. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack will announce the sites Wednesday, according to a White House official. President Obama unveiled the  program this summer as part of his broader plan to address global warming. The centers, which the Agriculture Department calls climate hubs, will link local agriculture producers with universities, industry groups, state governments and federal agencies such as the Department of Interior and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By David Pierson
CLOVIS, CALIF. - Beneath unyielding blue skies on a recent afternoon, Ryan Indart knelt down to examine what was left of one of his sheep pastures. Land that should have been lush with native grasses this time of year has been reduced to powdery dirt, splotched with a few withered strands of filaree and foxtail. And where there's no vegetation, there are no sheep. A fourth-generation rancher, Indart has already sent 10% of his 4,000 ewes - which he normally would want to keep - to the slaughterhouse because he can't afford the hay to feed them.
NEWS
August 11, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle stumped through the Central Valley on Monday afternoon trying to reassure ranchers that the Bush Administration sides with them in their fights with environmentalists and government rule-writers. "We're here to let you know that we're on your side," the vice president told a group of cattle ranchers, as they chatted in a picturesque hay-barn that happened to make a perfect setting for the evening news. After meeting with 10 members of the California Cattleman's Assn.
NEWS
January 5, 2000
It is ironic to see an article ("True Grit," Dec. 29) about romanticizing cattle ranchers in western Mojave when, in fact, the way of life is built on the backs of the American taxpayers by using land that should be available to the public rather than the few ranchers. It is interesting that Two Hole Springs ranch consists of 53,000 acres. The actual land ownership described in the article is only five acres, with the balance consisting of federal land tied up in cattle leases. It is further ironic that the cattle rancher, struggling in an increasingly regulatory environment, would take a potshot at the duck hunter, another anachronism doomed to extinction.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN and LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writers
Like a lot of western ranchers, Stan Davidson needs public grazing lands to survive. He owns a small ranch, but needs additional pasture in the spring and summer. Suitable land not owned by the government is too expensive to buy. Unlike a lot of western ranchers, Davidson has to pay fair-market value for the public grazing lands he uses--and he pays it to his competitors, who have exclusive government permits to graze those lands. The permittees pay the Bureau of Land Management $1.86 a month for each cow allowed to graze the vast expanse of BLM-managed public land.
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | PAMELA A. MacLEAN, United Press International
Federal officials are convinced that some Idaho cattle ranchers may be deliberately setting fire to government rangeland knowing that it will be immediately reseeded with grasses better for grazing. Suspected range torching by ranchers first came to light after a federal appeals court ruling last month in San Francisco involving a 1984 Idaho arson case and a ranch foreman who is a Peruvian national.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By John M. Glionna, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
The battle lines are hardening in Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy's so-called range war against the federal government over his right to graze cattle on public lands. Arguments have moved from the Nevada desert to the nation's capital, where Nevada's two U.S. senators, Republican Dean Heller and Democrat Harry Reid, recently faced off on a television public affairs show in Las Vegas. Heller described Bundy's cadre of armed supporters as “patriots” during the show, "What's the Point," on KSNV-TV News 3. Reid repeated his claim that the so-called militia men are “domestic terrorists.” Officials from the Bureau of Land Management say Bundy is illegally running hundreds of head of cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paresh Dave, This post has been updated. See below for details.
After spending a week whisking away nearly 400 cattle they said were illegally grazing on federal land in the Nevada desert, officials facing a battalion of protesters with horses and guns decided to free those cattle in a stunning reversal Saturday afternoon. A line of cattle calmly filtered out of a federal holding area at about 3 p.m. as protesters and law enforcement watched from alongside Interstate 15 near the Nevada-Arizona state line. "Due to escalating tensions, the cattle have been released from the enclosures in order to avoid violence and help restore order," the U.S. Bureau of Land Management said in a short statement.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and John M. Glionna
Fearing for their safety as armed protesters gathered in the Nevada back country, federal officials on Saturday suddenly ended a controversial effort to seize hundreds of cattle that a rancher has kept illegally on public land. The cattle ranch's owner, Cliven Bundy, and hundreds of armed supporters had threatened to forcefully keep Bureau of Land Management employees from rounding up the approximately 900 cattle. Nearly 400 of the cattle had been seized during the past week. They were being held nearby and could be sent to Utah, authorities said.
OPINION
April 10, 2014
Re "Hundreds rally for rancher," April 8 I'm with Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy, who claims he shouldn't have to pay the federal government grazing fees because his Mormon ancestors have worked the land since before the Bureau of Land Management was formed. I guess that means I don't have to pay taxes because my Mexican ancestors have been in this land since before the Declaration of Independence was written and signed. This treat comes just in time for tax day. Miguel Rosales Glendale Bundy admits that he abides by "almost zero federal laws.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2014 | By David Pierson and Tiffany Hsu
Come grilling season, expect your sirloin steak to come with a hearty side of sticker shock. Beef prices have reached all-time highs in the U.S. and aren't expected to come down any time soon. Extreme weather has thinned the nation's beef cattle herds to levels last seen in 1951, when there were about half as many mouths to feed in America. "We've seen strong prices before but nothing this extreme," said Dennis Smith, a commodities broker for Archer Financial Services in Chicago.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy after authorities began to seize his cattle from federal land. Protesters had responded to an alert that promised: "Range war begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!" Federal officials say Bundy is illegally running cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Sam Adams
A poetic, almost abstract portrait of impoverished ranchers waiting for rain, Everardo Gonzalez's documentary "Drought" traces the parched terrain of northern Mexico, in the communal region called Cuates de Australia. The film provides little in the way of background or ongoing story, although a young couple's journey from prenatal ultrasound to birth provides a rough, and somewhat contrived, sense of progress. González (who served as his own cinematographer) occasionally engages his subjects from behind the camera, but he mainly observes with an outsider's patient eye. He keeps his distance, leaving room for plenty of thoughtfully framed compositions and allowing the hush of a dried-up land to predominate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Along with hairpin curves and heart-stopping views of the Pacific, motorists on Highway 1 near San Simeon may glimpse a most exotic sight: a herd of zebras grazing in pastures along the road. They are what is left of what was once the world's largest private zoo ? a menagerie of camels, kangaroos, emus and giraffes that roamed the estate of newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst. Last week three zebras ? a buck, a mare and a yearling ? escaped from Hearst Ranch and wandered over to nearby Cambria.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and his family in a turf battle against the federal government. They had responded to an alert promising a new skirmish: “Range War begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!” Bundy is battling with federal officials over his cattle's grazing on 150 square miles of scrub desert overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS -- From the cab of his old pickup, Cliven Bundy watched the trucks congregate on the horizon near his ranch some 80 miles north of here. His ongoing range war with the federal government, Bundy said, has heated up yet again. Officials say Bundy is illegally running cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, a habitat of the protected desert tortoise. Last year, a U.S. District Court judge ruled that if the 68-year-old veteran rancher did not remove his cattle, they could be seized by the Bureau of Land Management.
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