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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Paul Brach, a painter and founding dean of the school of art at California Institute of the Arts who revolutionized teaching of the discipline by insisting that it reflect what is going on in contemporary art, has died. He was 83. Brach died of prostate cancer Nov. 16 at his home in East Hampton, N.Y., said Eleanor Flomenhaft, whose New York City gallery exhibits his work. Steven D.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1989 | KEN PAYTON, THE SACRAMENTO BEE
When the wind is calm on the high, empty desert of northwestern Nevada and the only sound is a Hereford bawling for water, a profound aloneness clamps a dry hand on most who venture very far from the normal dirt roads. But not on Denny Ellerman. Having never lived in a city, having never worked at anything but being a cowboy, he is forever a man who prefers to work alone and ride 15 miles on a day that may begin at 3 a.m.
NEWS
December 1, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On April 13, 1989, Douglas Preston mounted a horse named King on the banks of a river in an isolated corner of southeastern Arizona and set out on a 1,000-mile odyssey to trace the footsteps of a 16th-Century Spanish conquistador. For Preston, a writer who recently moved from New York to the Southwest, the thought of riding horses over rugged mountains and vast deserts was a romantic one. What could be better than sleeping under the stars and listening to the coyotes howl?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1990 | RIP RENSE, Rense is a regular contributor to Valley Calendar. and
Don't ever ask an old cowboy--or a cowboy-at-heart--too much about cowboy poetry and song. He's apt to choke right up, like Lou Schubert. Or like Mike Mahaney, who paused to collect himself while reciting a sample of the deceptively spare verses of the anonymous cowboy classic, "Blood on the Saddle": There was blood on the saddle There was blood on the ground And a great big puddle of blood all around.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rod Corder, a weekend general, has a momentary vision of glory. He sends his decoy troops to the left and takes two other soldiers into the brush on the right. "They're up ahead in the bush," he whispers. Then he creeps forward, engages the pump on his rifle and opens fire. But the enemy isn't fooled. The canyon is filled with the sounds of "bullets" whistling through the bushes. Moments later, purple paint drips from Corder's camouflage outfit. The opposing team had the drop on him.
NEWS
December 19, 1988 | PAUL DEAN, Times Staff Writer
It was Teddy Roosevelt who first ordered a White House lawn to be mowed, rolled, marked and made bully for tennis. It became a court of informal resort for senators and ambassadors, generals and judges, who became known as the Tennis Cabinet. History, many suspect, is repeating itself within the forming Administration of President-elect George Bush. Consider Bush's initial nominations and reappointments: Tennis players are the huge majority.
MAGAZINE
March 16, 2003 | Dan Baum, Dan Baum lived in Mexico for two years and writes often about border issues. He is the author of "Citizen Coors: An American Dynasty" (Morrow, 2000).
Chris Simcox won't stop fooling with his gun. He paces his tiny office, bouncing on the balls of his feet, and every 15 seconds his hands go to the gun on his belt--hiking it up, adjusting its angle, checking its safety. It's a big gun, a two-toned .45 in a hard plastic holster, and whenever he is photographed by the media--which is often these days--Simcox makes sure the pistol is in every frame.
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