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SPORTS
April 29, 1992 | MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Acting on a tip from a Los Angeles Department of Water and Power employee, Jim Edmondson of CalTrout visited the Eastern Sierra last summer to inspect a stretch of the Owens River a few miles north of Crowley Lake. Edmondson, a regional manager for the fishermen's activist group, said that, although he had been told that cattle-grazing practices on DWP land in the area were harming the river's trout fishery, he wasn't ready for what he found there.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1998 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day he died, Nicholaus Contreraz was awakened at 6:30 a.m. He had been sleeping on a mattress positioned halfway in the bathroom of Barracks 31. Staff at the Arizona Boys Ranch had placed the 16-year-old Sacramento youth on Yellow Shirt status for, among other reasons, persistently defecating and urinating on himself. They wanted him to be near the toilet.
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REAL ESTATE
April 28, 1985 | DAVID M. KINCHEN, Times Staff Writer
This may be the third largest city in the state, but it's also the home of some of the widest of wide open spaces. In the Mojave Desert of southeastern Kern County, this community of about 3,000 is the third largest city in area in the state with about 186 square miles. (Los Angeles is the largest with 465 square miles, followed by San Diego with 320 square miles.
SPORTS
April 29, 1992 | MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Acting on a tip from a Los Angeles Department of Water and Power employee, Jim Edmondson of CalTrout visited the Eastern Sierra last summer to inspect a stretch of the Owens River a few miles north of Crowley Lake. Edmondson, a regional manager for the fishermen's activist group, said that, although he had been told that cattle-grazing practices on DWP land in the area were harming the river's trout fishery, he wasn't ready for what he found there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1998 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day he died, Nicholaus Contreraz was awakened at 6:30 a.m. He had been sleeping on a mattress positioned halfway in the bathroom of Barracks 31. Staff at the Arizona Boys Ranch had placed the 16-year-old Sacramento youth on Yellow Shirt status for, among other reasons, persistently defecating and urinating on himself. They wanted him to be near the toilet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2001 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reputed 1909 double murder and suicide in Southern California led to the "last great manhunt" of the Old West, spawning national headlines; trumping up rumors of a presidential assassination plot and of an Indian uprising; and leaving a notorious legacy in books, a movie and finally a bitter academic fight that landed three authors in court.
NEWS
October 18, 1996
Harold J. "Butch" Powers, 96, a Modoc County rancher who served as lieutenant governor and was a state senator for 20 years. Born in Eagleville and educated at what became UC Davis, Powers was a familiar figure in Sacramento in his cowboy boots and hat. He owned working ranches in California, Nevada and Idaho. Powers became lieutenant governor in 1953 when Gov. Earl Warren was named U.S. chief justice and was succeeded as governor by Goodwin Knight.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS
Daniel L. Ritchie said Tuesday that he will leave his job as chairman and CEO of Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. on May 1. Westinghouse Electric Corp. named Burton B. Staniar as Ritchie's successor at the New York-based broadcasting subsidiary. Staniar, 45, currently serves as senior executive vice president of the broadcasting company, which counts five television stations and 13 radio stations among its holdings.
OPINION
May 14, 2002
Every spring, Forest Service officials yell "Fire!" in crowded legislative hearing rooms in an attempt to get more funding. This time, their talk of an ominous, early fire season in Southern California and across the West is all too true. Exhibit No. 1: the wildfires that swept areas from Santa Clarita to Camp Pendleton over the last few days.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times staff writer
An enthusiastic response to the revamp of Disneyland's California Adventure theme park was touted as one of the factors behind the Walt Disney Co.'s better-than-expected third-quarter profit. CEO Bob Iger said attendance at Disney California Adventure accounted for about half of the visits to its Anaheim parks, up from just a quarter previously . . . .  Alpaca ranches have existed in the U.S. only since 1984. To broaden awareness, they are opening to the public on Sept.  29 and 30, with special activities and educational opportunities. There are 10 participating farms and ranches in California.
REAL ESTATE
April 28, 1985 | DAVID M. KINCHEN, Times Staff Writer
This may be the third largest city in the state, but it's also the home of some of the widest of wide open spaces. In the Mojave Desert of southeastern Kern County, this community of about 3,000 is the third largest city in area in the state with about 186 square miles. (Los Angeles is the largest with 465 square miles, followed by San Diego with 320 square miles.
TRAVEL
September 7, 1986 | MICHELE GRIMM and TOM GRIMM, The Grimms of Laguna Beach are authors of "Away for the Weekend," a travel guide to Southern California.
Despite its early history as home to hundreds of cattle ranches, California has only a handful of guest ranches where you can get a taste of the Old West. Best known is the Alisal near Solvang, but there's another historic ranch in the Southland where would-be cowboys also are welcome. It's the Rankin Ranch, hidden high in the mountains of eastern Kern County. Rankin is one of the largest working cattle ranches in the state, sprawling across 31,000 acres of ruggedly beautiful countryside.
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