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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1994 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High up in the Antelope Valley, a mile from the Kern County line, shotgun-wielding ranchers and county officers armed with infrared sensors are out on a mission: stop the grisly massacres at the Nebeker ranch. The marauders strike quickly--a sudden shriek is sometimes the only warning an attack is in progress. The aftermath is a horrifying sight, rancher Eugene Nebeker says, reminding him of pictures of village massacres in the Vietnam War.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hours before dawn Friday, but animal control officers were already assembled--weary, but armed and game to do battle. Many had managed just a few hours of sleep since Monday, frustrated in their efforts to hunt down a pack of dogs that had killed dozens of local sheep. By week's end, the trail had gone cold--three of the dogs had eluded captors for days, blending into the desert darkness at night, hiding in the dense underbrush during the day. "Why don't we just napalm them?"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking inventory on the Cordova Ranch is different from any other business in Los Angeles County. Instead of pencil and paper, the Cordovas use horses and lariats to tally their stock. Livestock, that is. Every spring since 1784, the Cordovas and their friends have fanned out on horseback over the hills of Castaic to round up their cattle before sending some of them to market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1994 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High up in the Antelope Valley, a mile from the Kern County line, shotgun-wielding ranchers and county officers armed with infrared sensors are out on a mission: stop the grisly massacres at the Nebeker ranch. The marauders strike quickly--a sudden shriek is sometimes the only warning an attack is in progress. The aftermath is a horrifying sight, rancher Eugene Nebeker says, reminding him of pictures of village massacres in the Vietnam War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hours before dawn Friday, but animal control officers were already assembled--weary, but armed and game to do battle. Many had managed just a few hours of sleep since Monday, frustrated in their efforts to hunt down a pack of dogs that had killed dozens of local sheep. By week's end, the trail had gone cold--three of the dogs had eluded captors for days, blending into the desert darkness at night, hiding in the dense underbrush during the day. "Why don't we just napalm them?"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
The movie trailer known as "Innocence of Muslims," blamed for sparking riots in Egypt, Libya and Yemen, has cast an unwelcome spotlight on one of the busiest movie ranches in Los Angeles County. According to FilmL.A. Inc., responsible for filming permits in the area, a Duarte-based group called Media for Christ obtained a permit to film in the county for one day in August 2011. Although FilmL.A. did not disclose the location, citing a request by authorities not to release the permit because of public safety concerns, a source familiar with the project who was not authorized to speak publicly said the movie was partially shot at Blue Cloud Movie Ranch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Clint Eastwood's latest movie, "American Sniper," kicked off with a bang in Los Angeles County this week. The Warner Bros. film, which stars Bradley Cooper as a Navy SEAL who recounts his military exploits, began 10 days of filming Monday in an Afghan village set at the Blue Cloud Movie Ranch in the Santa Clarita area. The scenes involved "simulated warfare sequences with full load automatic gunfire, explosions, squibs, bullet hits, smoke, burning debris," according to a county film permit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking inventory on the Cordova Ranch is different from any other business in Los Angeles County. Instead of pencil and paper, the Cordovas use horses and lariats to tally their stock. Livestock, that is. Every spring since 1784, the Cordovas and their friends have fanned out on horseback over the hills of Castaic to round up their cattle before sending some of them to market.
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