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NEWS
July 12, 2000 | Associated Press
The House on Tuesday delayed a final vote on plans to spend $101 million to buy a 95,000-acre ranch in New Mexico. The House is scheduled to take up the issue today instead. The Senate has already approved the plan to buy Baca Ranch northwest of Santa Fe, and House passage would send it to the White House for President Clinton's signature. Critics say $101 million is too high a price for the land.
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NEWS
July 12, 2000 | Associated Press
The House on Tuesday delayed a final vote on plans to spend $101 million to buy a 95,000-acre ranch in New Mexico. The House is scheduled to take up the issue today instead. The Senate has already approved the plan to buy Baca Ranch northwest of Santa Fe, and House passage would send it to the White House for President Clinton's signature. Critics say $101 million is too high a price for the land.
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TRAVEL
March 27, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Six elk cheeseburgers sizzled in a huge battered frying pan that looked as if it might be in its second century. Flames leaped from spruce logs in the fire pit to several inches over the pan's edges. As wrangler/cook Jim Town laid thick slices of Cheddar cheese on the elk patties, the darkening sky above Sugarloaf Lake, 50 feet away, began to talk. A distant rumble of thunder was first, then, like a bomb, came a blast from directly overhead.
MAGAZINE
March 21, 1993 | ALAN WEISMAN, Contributing editor Alan Weisman's last piece for this magazine chronicled the hole in the ozone layer. He will next co-produce a series for NPR called "Searching for Solutions."
This," breathed the man in the sweater standing next to me, "may be the most beautiful place on Earth." From anyone else, it would have been a stock, cliched response to the splendor before us: a mountain range bursting from a vast golden meadow, its rhyolite faces soaked crimson in brilliant afternoon sunlight. But this was John C. Sawhill speaking, the president of the Nature Conservancy, proprietor of the largest private system of nature reserves in the world. And this was the biggest, most costly of the 1,300 choice pieces of the planet owned by his organization, the wealthiest environmental group of all. Three years earlier, Nature Conservancy had invested $18 million, more than a tenth of its entire operating capital, right here: the mammoth Gray Ranch in southwestern New Mexico, on the U.S.-Mexico border.
MAGAZINE
March 21, 1993 | ALAN WEISMAN, Contributing editor Alan Weisman's last piece for this magazine chronicled the hole in the ozone layer. He will next co-produce a series for NPR called "Searching for Solutions."
This," breathed the man in the sweater standing next to me, "may be the most beautiful place on Earth." From anyone else, it would have been a stock, cliched response to the splendor before us: a mountain range bursting from a vast golden meadow, its rhyolite faces soaked crimson in brilliant afternoon sunlight. But this was John C. Sawhill speaking, the president of the Nature Conservancy, proprietor of the largest private system of nature reserves in the world. And this was the biggest, most costly of the 1,300 choice pieces of the planet owned by his organization, the wealthiest environmental group of all. Three years earlier, Nature Conservancy had invested $18 million, more than a tenth of its entire operating capital, right here: the mammoth Gray Ranch in southwestern New Mexico, on the U.S.-Mexico border.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON — Police and federal agents pulled the car over in a suburb north of Denver. An FBI agent showed his badge. The driver appeared not startled at all. "My friend," he said, "I have been waiting for you. " And with that, Jesus Audel Miramontes-Varela stepped out of his white 2002 BMW X5 and into the arms of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Over the next several days at his ranch in Colorado and an FBI safe house in Albuquerque, the Mexican cartel chieftain — who had reputedly fed one of his victims to lions in Mexico — was transformed into one of the FBI's top informants on the Southwest border.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1996 | RICHARD BENKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They put him on a horse when he was 2, expecting he would accept his role in affluent St. Louis society. Instead, Drum Hadley rode southwest, notching his own place in a seamless border landscape. Through his family-owned Animas Foundation, Hadley--poet, rancher, environmentalist--oversees the 500-square-mile Gray Ranch, covering more territory than the city of Los Angeles. The Nature Conservancy has designated the ranch one of the world's "last great places."
NEWS
January 21, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A solid majority of Americans favor U.S. military intervention to remove Saddam Hussein from power in Iraq, and many are also willing to support some uses of armed force in Bosnia-Herzegovina and other conflicts around the world, the Los Angeles Times Poll has found. The results appear to give President Clinton a relatively free hand to use U.S. air and naval power in those situations and seem to refute the view that Americans have turned deeply isolationist.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, Times Staff Writer
The first time Robert O. Anderson started an oil company, things were simpler. In 1942, all he needed was $150,000 in capital, a couple of partners and $1,400 in drilling rig equipment. He packed up his belongings and his new wife and daughter and drove half a continent from his native Chicago to settle in the arid desert of New Mexico. It worked out pretty well. After 25 years as an independent oilman and wildcatter, Anderson helped create and run Atlantic Richfield Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez is a Times staff writer
First, who he is: the highest-paid Spanish-language singer on Earth. Where he lives: among a dozen mansions and ranches across the Americas--but mostly on a rose-filled estate in Malibu. Age: middle. Style of music: gigantic ballads. Years performing: 28. Number of records sold: 35 million. Now, who he is not: Julio Iglesias, the Latin pop singer best known to English-language fans.
TRAVEL
March 27, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Six elk cheeseburgers sizzled in a huge battered frying pan that looked as if it might be in its second century. Flames leaped from spruce logs in the fire pit to several inches over the pan's edges. As wrangler/cook Jim Town laid thick slices of Cheddar cheese on the elk patties, the darkening sky above Sugarloaf Lake, 50 feet away, began to talk. A distant rumble of thunder was first, then, like a bomb, came a blast from directly overhead.
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