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Rancho Camulos National Historic Landmark

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2001 | GINGER ORR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It took only an afternoon at Rancho Camulos more than a century ago to inspire novelist Helen Hunt Jackson to make it the setting of her epic romance "Ramona." And the location's allure was enough to spark the interest of historians and local politicians, who succeeded in having the aging ranch designated Ventura County's first National Historic Landmark last year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2001 | GINGER ORR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It took only a single afternoon at Rancho Camulos more than a century ago for novelist Helen Hunt Jackson to be inspired enough to make it the setting of her epic romance "Ramona." And the location's allure was enough to spark the interest of historians and local politicians, who succeeded in having the aging ranch designated Ventura County's first national historic landmark last year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2001 | GINGER ORR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It took only a single afternoon at Rancho Camulos more than a century ago for novelist Helen Hunt Jackson to be inspired enough to make it the setting of her epic romance "Ramona." And the location's allure was enough to spark the interest of historians and local politicians, who succeeded in having the aging ranch designated Ventura County's first national historic landmark last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2001 | GINGER ORR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It took only an afternoon at Rancho Camulos more than a century ago to inspire novelist Helen Hunt Jackson to make it the setting of her epic romance "Ramona." And the location's allure was enough to spark the interest of historians and local politicians, who succeeded in having the aging ranch designated Ventura County's first National Historic Landmark last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2004 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Balancing growth with protecting the Santa Clara River, the last free-flowing river in Southern California, is the goal of an $8.2-million study by a partnership that includes Ventura and Los Angeles counties. Plans for the four-year study were announced Wednesday at a news conference held under a canopy of oaks in the Santa Clara River Valley and attended by Ventura County Supervisor Kathy Long, Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich and representatives from the Army Corps of Engineers.
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