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Rancho De Los Diablos

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NEWS
October 4, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do not look for it on any map, but Rancho de los Diablos definitely exists, much to the chagrin of some of its upscale neighbors. Rancho de los Diablos is at ground zero in the debate in California over whether recent immigrants--legal and illegal--are a resource to be nurtured or an intolerable drag on an economically depressed state.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1995 | AMANDA COVARRUBIAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Juana Diaz misses her lush vegetable garden and washing her family's laundry by hand. "Clothes don't get as clean in a machine," Diaz said, shaking her head as she sat on her children's bed in their two-bedroom apartment. They have wall-to-wall carpeting, a bathroom with running water and a refrigerator that keeps food cold. Compared to life in the migrant camp, their lifestyle is luxurious. "We're better here," Diaz said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1994 | AMANDA COVARRUBIAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They call the place where the Diaz family lives Rancho de los Diablos--Ranch of the Devils. Visit them, and you'll understand why. The four-room shack is cobbled together with salvaged cardboard and plywood, the roof thatched with green trash bags to repel rain. Carpet pieces cover dirt floors. Small windows in two rooms allow the only natural light. Still, this migrant camp represents an improvement. "In a way, this house is better," said Rogelio Diaz Torrez, 25. "The cardboard is thicker.
MAGAZINE
November 27, 1994 | ELSTON CARR, Eslton Carr has been a regular contributor to the LA Weekly and is a graduate student at the UCLA Center for Afro-American Studies
No morning at Rancho de los Diablos really begins until Don Trino descends into the canyon at a few minutes past 4 in his red-and-silver lunch truck. Before any light, before the roosters crow on the eastern side of the camp, don Trino parks near two eucalyptus trees and waits silently in the cab.
MAGAZINE
November 27, 1994 | ELSTON CARR, Eslton Carr has been a regular contributor to the LA Weekly and is a graduate student at the UCLA Center for Afro-American Studies
No morning at Rancho de los Diablos really begins until Don Trino descends into the canyon at a few minutes past 4 in his red-and-silver lunch truck. Before any light, before the roosters crow on the eastern side of the camp, don Trino parks near two eucalyptus trees and waits silently in the cab.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1995 | AMANDA COVARRUBIAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Juana Diaz misses her lush vegetable garden and washing her family's laundry by hand. "Clothes don't get as clean in a machine," Diaz said, shaking her head as she sat on her children's bed in their two-bedroom apartment. They have wall-to-wall carpeting, a bathroom with running water and a refrigerator that keeps food cold. Compared to life in the migrant camp, their lifestyle is luxurious. "We're better here," Diaz said.
MAGAZINE
January 15, 1995
As a third-generation Japanese American, I find it hard to believe that the Ukegawas could be so insensitive to the plight of their workers ("The Last Days of Rancho de los Diablos," by Elston Carr, Nov. 27). Didn't they learn anything from having been incarcerated during World War II? I also find it odd that Jimmy Ukegawa says workers are being overpaid when they are getting $4.25 an hour. No wonder the Mexicans call them " los diablos ." Meg Shimatsu Los Angeles Carr's article offers a classic demonstration of man's inhumanity to man, even countryman to countryman, where money is involved.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An hour before dawn, Tony Mendez squats in a dank Tijuana culvert, waiting for his chance to slip past a U.S. Border Patrol sentry. Snared by immigration agents in an Ontario doughnut shop, Mendez has no doubt that he eventually will return to his job washing catering trucks. At the moment, he is more concerned about making it back in time for his 15-year-old cousin's gala coming-out party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1994 | AMANDA COVARRUBIAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They call the place where the Diaz family lives Rancho de los Diablos--Ranch of the Devils. Visit them, and you'll understand why. The four-room shack is cobbled together with salvaged cardboard and plywood, the roof thatched with green trash bags to repel rain. Carpet pieces cover dirt floors. Small windows in two rooms allow the only natural light. Still, this migrant camp represents an improvement. "In a way, this house is better," said Rogelio Diaz Torrez, 25. "The cardboard is thicker.
NEWS
October 4, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do not look for it on any map, but Rancho de los Diablos definitely exists, much to the chagrin of some of its upscale neighbors. Rancho de los Diablos is at ground zero in the debate in California over whether recent immigrants--legal and illegal--are a resource to be nurtured or an intolerable drag on an economically depressed state.
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