Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRancho Mission Viejo
IN THE NEWS

Rancho Mission Viejo

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo
With its tidy model homes, gleaming new clubhouses and rows of fresh wooden frames, the "village" of Sendero in south Orange County offers a pristine view of the new building boom. The development - which will total about a thousand new homes on 690 acres when finished - shows the degree to which big builders are confident that real estate has stabilized. Sendero is the first leg of a project that has been long in the works, called Rancho Mission Viejo. Developers expect 14,000 homes will go up in this massive, master-planned community over the next two decades.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo
With its tidy model homes, gleaming new clubhouses and rows of fresh wooden frames, the "village" of Sendero in south Orange County offers a pristine view of the new building boom. The development - which will total about a thousand new homes on 690 acres when finished - shows the degree to which big builders are confident that real estate has stabilized. Sendero is the first leg of a project that has been long in the works, called Rancho Mission Viejo. Developers expect 14,000 homes will go up in this massive, master-planned community over the next two decades.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 6, 2002
Re "The Long View for Land Use," editorial, Dec. 16: As a supporter of the Zoological Society of San Diego and the Center for the Reproduction of Endangered Species, I wanted to comment on the critical importance of the preservation of the 23,000-acre Rancho Mission Viejo to world conservation efforts. It is alarming to observe the increasing development pressure on one of the 25 most-threatened hot spots of biological diversity on Earth. This critical area, which supports many rare and endangered native species, is highlighted on the conservation maps of many international organizations.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
The gig : Mike Evans is the founder of Tree of Life Nursery near San Juan Capistrano, California's largest seller of native plants. Over 30 years, he and business partner Jeff Bohn have become mainstays for natural restoration and landscaping projects. They welcome retail customers as well as a core clientele of commercial landscapers to the cluster of straw-bale offices and barns on historic Rancho Mission Viejo. California native: Evans, 57, was born in Arcadia, raised in Newport Beach and has lived in San Juan Capistrano for 32 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2001
Re "Ranch Unrolls the Blueprints," Nov. 10: The public should be aware that the recent filing of a proposal for massive development on the Rancho Mission Viejo flies in the face of promises by the developer in 1993 to formulate a scientifically based Natural Community Conservation Plan. This program could provide a meaningful and responsive public process. In addition, much of the "open space" proposed by the developer is a sham. A patchwork of sprawl, roads and estate lots would chop up a landscape so beautiful and of such natural value that it is Orange County's very heart and soul.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2004 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
With plans to develop Rancho Mission Viejo coming up for a crucial review Monday, Orange County Supervisor Tom Wilson is proposing that the developer ante up millions more for road improvements and environmental studies and dedicate 60 acres for affordable housing. The concessions are an attempt to mollify opposition to the 23,000-acre project, which could eventually put 14,000 new homes in rapidly developing south Orange County. About two-thirds of the land would remain open space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2001
Re ""Growth No Longer a Given,"" Aug. 5 editorial: The Rancho Mission Viejo Co. has barged ahead in its development scheme, as most developers do, without taking into account public interest. Presumably this development is to be under the Natural Community Conservation Planning (NCCP) process, but under this process the county, the concerned environmental organizations and the public are to be involved in a development from the beginning. Instead, we are told that 14,000 homes will be built.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2001
Re "Let's Keep It This Way," Commentary, Oct. 21: Thanks to Councilman John Gelff for his excellent essay on the need to preserve Rancho Mission Viejo and its unique natural heritage. This wilderness landscape represents a fragile and fast-disappearing resource. The Med-iterranean-type system in South County represents one of the biologically richest and most endangered terrestrial ecoregions on earth. There are only four other places in the world that share this type of climate. The high levels of species diversity found in this ecoregion include endangered plants and wildlife found nowhere else.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2001
Re "Little Benefit Seen for Parks in Growth Plan," July 21: Once again our elected representatives prove what little regard they have for the future of our natural resources. By voting to allocate only a 1,600-acre portion of land for public parks while 14,000 more homes will be built in Rancho Mission Viejo, they are disregarding the fact that we don't need more building in Orange County. We are already greatly impacted by overpopulation and too much growth. This is evidenced by the constant beach closures due to sewage and toxic waste spills, the energy crisis in which we all are admonished to cut back on our electric usage, the coyote and mountain lion attacks as we increasingly infringe on their territories, and a myriad of other problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1986 | JOHN NEEDHAM, Times Staff Writer
In a throwback to pioneer days, members of the O'Neill family received permission Wednesday to establish a private family cemetery on a portion of the 40,000 acres they own at Rancho Mission Viejo. "Because of their longstanding ties to the land, they were very interested in having a place on the land to be used as a private cemetery for family members," a spokesman for the family said. The Board of Supervisors Wednesday approved the cemetery, with Supervisor Thomas F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2009 | Claire Noland
Richard J. O'Neill, a prominent landowner and Democratic Party activist who helped transform the landscape of Orange County by developing his family's vast Rancho Mission Viejo, died Saturday. He was 85. O'Neill, who served as California Democratic Party chairman from 1979 to 1981, died of natural causes at his ranch home east of San Juan Capistrano, according to Rancho Mission Viejo spokeswoman Diane Gaynor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2008 | Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writer
Orange County supervisors Tuesday approved a plan to give control of 1,200 acres of open space to a land trust backed by a developer that supports building a six-lane toll road through the property. The developer, Rancho Mission Viejo, says it plans to add the land to its own 17,000-acre open space preserve and maintain it as undeveloped land. The land was originally set aside as part of an earlier agreement to offset the environmental and wildlife effects of housing developments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2007 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
About 32,000 acres of oak-studded woodlands in southern Orange County, including land that's home to endangered species such as the California gnatcatcher and the arroyo toad, will be set aside as a nature reserve, federal wildlife authorities announced Thursday. Environmental officials have worked for more than a dozen years to preserve the foothills east of Mission Viejo, San Juan Capistrano and San Clemente, cities that have had high growth in recent years.
OPINION
December 24, 2005
The Transportation Corridor Agencies will do anything to build the 16-mile Foothill South extension through the San Mateo Campground and San Onofre State Beach (Dec. 18). This includes ignoring the real transportation needs for south Orange County -- dealing with the 40,000-plus new residents projected for the planned Rancho Mission Viejo development. The alignment that cuts through the San Mateo Watershed was intended to serve new housing once planned for the development's south section.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2005 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
A settlement in a lawsuit by environmentalists seeking to block development of Rancho Mission Viejo was approved Tuesday by the Orange County Board of Supervisors, clearing the final legal challenge to develop 14,000 homes over two decades on the last remaining large swath of private land in the county. The settlement reduces development in key wildlife habitat areas and increases open space for wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2005 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
A lawsuit seeking to block development of Rancho Mission Viejo was settled Tuesday, removing one of the legal challenges to building about 14,000 homes and 380 acres of commercial space on the last remaining large swath of private land in Orange County. The suit, filed in Orange County Superior Court by the city of Mission Viejo after the county approved the project last year, took issue with how the county planned to deal with increased traffic resulting from the controversial development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2004 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
A coalition of environmental groups sued Orange County on Wednesday for approving the Rancho Mission Viejo development plan, which calls for as many as 14,000 homes on the largest swath of undeveloped land in South County. The lawsuit alleges, among other things, that the county did not adequately address the project's effect on sensitive habitat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2004 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
Clearing the first major hurdle for building homes and businesses on Orange County's largest remaining swath of privately owned open space, the Board of Supervisors on Monday unanimously approved development plans for the 23,000-acre Rancho Mission Viejo. The decision means the land's owner could eventually build as many as 14,000 homes, commercial and community facilities on 380 acres, and 25 acres of golf courses on the south Orange County property.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|