Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRancho Mission Viejo Co
IN THE NEWS

Rancho Mission Viejo Co

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Agreeing to a temporary building moratorium on most of their property, Orange County's three largest developers have enrolled 26,000 acres of privately owned coastal sage scrub in the state's effort to design preserves for the California gnatcatcher and other rare animals, county officials announced Tuesday. By signing the state contracts, the Irvine Co., Rancho Mission Viejo Co. and the Arvida Co.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2003 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
After half a century of go-go development, the final build-out of Orange County is underway, with applications in the works by the Irvine Co., Rancho Mission Viejo Co. and major oil companies for massive housing and commercial projects at the county's remnant rural edges. "We're outta land. We don't have any dirt left," said Michelle Wolkoys, a real estate analyst with the Meyers Group in Costa Mesa.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A series of villages with a total of 14,000 homes would extend from San Juan Capistrano to the Cleveland National Forest under a plan presented Thursday by Rancho Mission Viejo for the last swath of privately owned open space in Orange County. The villages, to be built over the next 30 years, would have single-family homes, townhouses, apartments, senior housing, retail and office space, according to the company's proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2001 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying Rancho Mission Viejo contains the last, best stretches of certain unique habitats and species, a consortium of environmentalists, biologists and elected officials Wednesday launched a campaign to preserve vast stretches of the land. Rancho Mission Viejo Co. recently rolled out plans to build 14,000 homes on the 23,000-acre ranch in southern Orange County, as well as preserve 14,000 acres. The ranch sprawls roughly from San Juan Capistrano to the Cleveland National Forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2001 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying Rancho Mission Viejo contains the last, best stretches of certain unique habitats and species, a consortium of environmentalists, biologists and elected officials Wednesday launched a campaign to preserve vast stretches of the land. Rancho Mission Viejo Co. recently rolled out plans to build 14,000 homes on the 23,000-acre ranch in southern Orange County, as well as preserve 14,000 acres. The ranch sprawls roughly from San Juan Capistrano to the Cleveland National Forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2001 | JOHN S. GELFF, John S. Gelff is a San Juan Capistrano city councilman. and
Even a casual observer driving along Ortega Highway, not far east of San Juan Capistrano, senses something special in the surrounding gentle landscape. These undeveloped foothills and valleys are a unique remnant of a once-great wilderness. Called Rancho Mission Viejo, these 25,000 acres are what remain of a Mexican land grant. Today, golden eagles still soar, mountain lions roam, and rare steelhead trout swim in San Mateo Creek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2001 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out where the city meets what's left of the country, Salvador Uribe lived the life of his dreams, a life that revolved around an uncompromising code of hard work and responsibility and doing what needed to be done. When car horns blared from the highway in the middle of the night, Uribe would leap from bed, grab a flashlight and check the fences that surround Rancho Mission Viejo, Orange County's last working ranch. The 47-year-old was the cattle boss and one of his animals might be in trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2003 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
After half a century of go-go development, the final build-out of Orange County is underway, with applications in the works by the Irvine Co., Rancho Mission Viejo Co. and major oil companies for massive housing and commercial projects at the county's remnant rural edges. "We're outta land. We don't have any dirt left," said Michelle Wolkoys, a real estate analyst with the Meyers Group in Costa Mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The Board of Supervisors approved an environmental report that extends the closure date for the county's 1,530-acre Prima Deschecha landfill in San Juan Capistrano to 2065. Despite the board's approval, county staff plans to negotiate further with the Rancho Mission Viejo Co. which believes the environmental report failed to address impacts on future development near the landfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1999 | Sean Kirwan, (949) 574-4202
City officials expect the new Ladera Ranch project to have a positive effect on the city, whether or not the area becomes a part of Mission Viejo. The master-planned community, which Mission Viejo is considering annexing, stretches across 4,000 acres on the east side of Arroyo Canyon. Ladera will be developed in stages over the next 10 years by the Rancho Mission Viejo Co. "I feel like we are welcoming a new resident to the neighborhood," Mayor Sherri M. Butterfield said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2001 | JOHN S. GELFF, John S. Gelff is a San Juan Capistrano city councilman. and
Even a casual observer driving along Ortega Highway, not far east of San Juan Capistrano, senses something special in the surrounding gentle landscape. These undeveloped foothills and valleys are a unique remnant of a once-great wilderness. Called Rancho Mission Viejo, these 25,000 acres are what remain of a Mexican land grant. Today, golden eagles still soar, mountain lions roam, and rare steelhead trout swim in San Mateo Creek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2001 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out where the city meets what's left of the country, Salvador Uribe lived the life of his dreams, a life that revolved around an uncompromising code of hard work and responsibility and doing what needed to be done. When car horns blared from the highway in the middle of the night, Uribe would leap from bed, grab a flashlight and check the fences that surround Rancho Mission Viejo, Orange County's last working ranch. The 47-year-old was the cattle boss and one of his animals might be in trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A series of villages with a total of 14,000 homes would extend from San Juan Capistrano to the Cleveland National Forest under a plan presented Thursday by Rancho Mission Viejo for the last swath of privately owned open space in Orange County. The villages, to be built over the next 30 years, would have single-family homes, townhouses, apartments, senior housing, retail and office space, according to the company's proposal.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Agreeing to a temporary building moratorium on most of their property, Orange County's three largest developers have enrolled 26,000 acres of privately owned coastal sage scrub in the state's effort to design preserves for the California gnatcatcher and other rare animals, county officials announced Tuesday. By signing the state contracts, the Irvine Co., Rancho Mission Viejo Co. and the Arvida Co.
OPINION
March 30, 2003
This is how I feel when I think of 14,000 homes being built on our beautiful open hills. My husband and I just drove past this lush countryside of Rancho Mission Viejo and commented what destruction the building of 14,000 homes would entail. If we cannot hold onto some undeveloped land, what do we have to look forward to but more traffic, more concrete, more pollution, more tainted water runoff into our ocean, more businesses failing because of too much competition, and less of everything else that is beautiful?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2001 | From Times staff reports
Orange County officials will seek public comment tonight at a hearing on Rancho Mission Viejo Co.'s land holdings in South County. About 25,000 acres of the ranch are used for grazing, agriculture and mineral extraction, but the landowners are considering a plan to develop part of the 119-year-old ranch.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|