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Rancho Palos Verdes Ca Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 28, 1973, residents of what was to become Rancho Palos Verdes voted overwhelmingly for incorporation, halting county attempts to urbanize the rugged landscape of custom-built houses with picturesque ocean views. Now, as the city celebrates its 20th anniversary, residents can still boast of semirural, well-to-do living. But the upscale spaciousness has come at a price.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 28, 1973, residents of what was to become Rancho Palos Verdes voted overwhelmingly for incorporation, halting county attempts to urbanize the rugged landscape of custom-built houses with picturesque ocean views. Now, as the city celebrates its 20th anniversary, residents can still boast of semirural, well-to-do living. But the upscale spaciousness has come at a price.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992
The Rancho Palos Verdes City Council, warning that a severe budget deficit could lead to more cutbacks in city services, has voted unanimously to put a $200-a-year parcel tax on the city's April ballot. The exact language of the measure is being worked out and is expected to get final approval in a special council meeting Saturday. The council was unanimous in its message to the voters: If they reject the parcel tax, the city will be forced to shut down many more government services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992
The Rancho Palos Verdes City Council, warning that a severe budget deficit could lead to more cutbacks in city services, has voted unanimously to put a $200-a-year parcel tax on the city's April ballot. The exact language of the measure is being worked out and is expected to get final approval in a special council meeting Saturday. The council was unanimous in its message to the voters: If they reject the parcel tax, the city will be forced to shut down many more government services.
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