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Rancho Palos Verdes Ca Finances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fiscal crisis in Rancho Palos Verdes is so severe city officials plan to go to the voters in April with this grim proposition: Either raise taxes or shut down most of the city government. Faced with a $2.4-million shortfall in its $7-million budget for the 1992-93 fiscal year, this city of 42,000 has already sharply cut services and is considering laying off another 10% of its work force. That would leave the city with only 35 full-time employees, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1998
In a 3-2 vote, the Rancho Palos Verdes City Council approved a monthly stipend of $50 for the city's planning commissioners, officials announced Wednesday. The money would be put toward the commissioners' travel expenses and general wear and tear on their cars. The five commissioners, after comparing standard stipends with the League of California Cities, had originally asked for $75 per month.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time and time again, Rancho Palos Verdes residents have rejected tax proposals at the ballot box. This week, the City Council held its first public meeting on a plan to impose new taxes without holding a public vote--and the reaction was surprisingly supportive. The proposal discussed at Tuesday's hearing calls for a 3.5% utility tax for road repairs, and the extension of an average $52-per-household fee to pay for landscape and lighting maintenance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rancho Palos Verdes City Council has adopted a 3% utility tax to pay for road maintenance and repairs, staving off a fiscal crisis that could have left potholes unfilled and rutted streets unpaved. The tax, approved in a 3-1 vote Tuesday, will be based on consumption, although it is estimated that the average homeowner will pay about $80 more per year. It will be levied on water, gas, electrical and phone bills starting at the end of December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rancho Palos Verdes City Council has adopted a 3% utility tax to pay for road maintenance and repairs, staving off a fiscal crisis that could have left potholes unfilled and rutted streets unpaved. The tax, approved in a 3-1 vote Tuesday, will be based on consumption, although it is estimated that the average homeowner will pay about $80 more per year. It will be levied on water, gas, electrical and phone bills starting at the end of December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 28, 1973, residents of what was to become Rancho Palos Verdes voted overwhelmingly for incorporation, halting county attempts to urbanize the rugged landscape of custom-built houses with picturesque ocean views. Now, as the city celebrates its 20th anniversary, residents can still boast of semirural, well-to-do living. But the upscale spaciousness has come at a price.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992
The Rancho Palos Verdes City Council, warning that a severe budget deficit could lead to more cutbacks in city services, has voted unanimously to put a $200-a-year parcel tax on the city's April ballot. The exact language of the measure is being worked out and is expected to get final approval in a special council meeting Saturday. The council was unanimous in its message to the voters: If they reject the parcel tax, the city will be forced to shut down many more government services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1998
In a 3-2 vote, the Rancho Palos Verdes City Council approved a monthly stipend of $50 for the city's planning commissioners, officials announced Wednesday. The money would be put toward the commissioners' travel expenses and general wear and tear on their cars. The five commissioners, after comparing standard stipends with the League of California Cities, had originally asked for $75 per month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time and time again, Rancho Palos Verdes residents have rejected tax proposals at the ballot box. This week, the City Council held its first public meeting on a plan to impose new taxes without holding a public vote--and the reaction was surprisingly supportive. The proposal discussed at Tuesday's hearing calls for a 3.5% utility tax for road repairs, and the extension of an average $52-per-household fee to pay for landscape and lighting maintenance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 28, 1973, residents of what was to become Rancho Palos Verdes voted overwhelmingly for incorporation, halting county attempts to urbanize the rugged landscape of custom-built houses with picturesque ocean views. Now, as the city celebrates its 20th anniversary, residents can still boast of semirural, well-to-do living. But the upscale spaciousness has come at a price.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992
The Rancho Palos Verdes City Council, warning that a severe budget deficit could lead to more cutbacks in city services, has voted unanimously to put a $200-a-year parcel tax on the city's April ballot. The exact language of the measure is being worked out and is expected to get final approval in a special council meeting Saturday. The council was unanimous in its message to the voters: If they reject the parcel tax, the city will be forced to shut down many more government services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fiscal crisis in Rancho Palos Verdes is so severe city officials plan to go to the voters in April with this grim proposition: Either raise taxes or shut down most of the city government. Faced with a $2.4-million shortfall in its $7-million budget for the 1992-93 fiscal year, this city of 42,000 has already sharply cut services and is considering laying off another 10% of its work force. That would leave the city with only 35 full-time employees, officials said.
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