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Rancho Santa Fe Ca

NEWS
March 31, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ed Mayers strode across the luscious green grass at the Rancho Santa Fe Country Club and explained how 39 mass suicides could chip holes in the veneer of privacy built by residents of this exclusive enclave known simply as "the Ranch." "This is a place where people live in denial of the rest of the world," said the retired manufacturer, lining up a three-foot putt on a glorious morning. "The Ranch is a place where people practice civility in an uncivil world.
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NEWS
March 31, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As coroners completed the grim task of examining the bodies of 39 cult members who died in a mass suicide here, a real estate agent said Sunday that two wealthy businessmen have offered to buy and raze the mansion where the deaths took place. The two men want to protect local property values and "spare Rancho Santa Fe the stigma of what happened" at the 9,200-square-foot house atop Colina Norte, real estate agent Steve Leggitt said.
NEWS
March 31, 1997 | Associated Press
The 39 Heaven's Gate cult members who committed suicide last week had insured themselves against being abducted, impregnated or killed by aliens, an insurance agent who specializes in unusual policies said Sunday. The cult bought a policy Oct. 10 that would pay out $1 million to each member's beneficiaries, said Simon Burgess, managing director of Goodfellow Rebecca Ingrams Pearson, an insurance brokerage.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
With the lighting of paschal candles and the ancient proclamation "He is risen!" Christians throughout the world today celebrate the central tenet of their faith--the resurrection of a Jewish holy man they call the Son of God. But as millions of the faithful observe the holiest day of their liturgical year, the Easter stories come against a backdrop of hopelessness--or misplaced hope--made grotesquely real by the mass suicide of 39 members of a cult in Rancho Santa Fe.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | DAVID FERRELL and JESSE KATZ and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Befitting the space alien he claimed to be, Marshall Applewhite never really succeeded here on Earth, never made the desired inroads in human society. His message was aimed at the fringe, but it seemed a bit too far out for most, almost a caricature of wacky California thought. A redeemer descended from the "Next Level," he was locked in decades of spiritual war with rival space aliens.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | GREG KRIKORIAN and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
San Diego County medical examiners Saturday worked through their grim backlog of 39 autopsies, using forklifts to haul bodies two at a time into a refrigerated tractor-trailer as camera crews recorded the macabre scene. As the row of corpses grew and grew, the son of Heaven's Gate cult leader Marshall Applewhite apologized to the families who had lost loved ones to the mass suicide.
NEWS
March 30, 1997
1931: Marshall Herff Applewhite is born to a traveling Presbyterian minister and his wife, who raise a family full of religion and music. Late 1960s: Applewhite lands professorship at St. Thomas University in Houston. He teaches music and sings in the Houston opera, but his emotive nature chafes against the school's formal traditions. Applewhite was reportedly homosexual--despite his wife and two children--and too sexually outgoing for the east Texas community.
NEWS
March 29, 1997 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came shock, then the finger-pointing. On the Internet, where Heaven's Gate members maintained an extensive World Wide Web site and sent out large chunks of their philosophy to message groups, the reaction to the mass suicide began with sympathy and empathy. "It is terribly sad. People are searching for peace," wrote a regular on the message group known as alt.support.depression. "Who better than us know that feeling too well?" But it wasn't long before the digital fur was flying.
NEWS
March 29, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA and ALAN ABRAHAMSON and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Grieving families around the nation began Friday to plan funerals for relatives they had long ago lost to the Heaven's Gate cult, which promised disciples they could evolve into extraterrestrials by severing all links to modern society and human desires.
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