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Rancho Santa Fe Ca

NEWS
March 29, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In New York, cult expert Marcia Rudin got more calls than she could possibly answer, forcing her to turn away anxious parents whose children had slipped deep into mysterious sects. In Los Angeles, Debbie Pine dashed from one television interview to another, laying out the warning signs of cult affiliation for a suddenly attentive public.
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NEWS
March 28, 1997 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR and GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Before it became the elegant coffin of an apocalyptic cult, the $1.6-million estate at the end of the Colina Norte cul-de-sac was simply prime Southern California property: three acres on a hilltop. Seven bedrooms, 7 1/2 baths, an elevator. Outside a pool, tennis court, even a putting green. The glossy pages of a real estate bible annointed the residence, with its sweeping ocean and canyon views, one of San Diego's dream homes.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bodies came Thursday in industrial-strength doses, brought to the San Diego County medical examiner's office by the truckload, then carried two by two on a forklift to a waiting semi-truck-turned-cooler, its walls sweating under a warm sun.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | LARRY GORDON and HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The quiet, tragic end of 39 lives inside a palatial home in Rancho Santa Fe this week may have had its roots in a chance meeting more than 20 years ago of two disaffected people--one a nurse and the other her patient in a Texas hospital. The two were Bonnie Lu Trousdale Nettles and Marshall Herff Applewhite, who, according to experts and a videotaped history produced by the Heaven's Gate cult, has more recently been known as "Do" (pronounced Doe), the cult's charismatic leader.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | PETER H. KING
Of course it happened in California. Where else would 39 keyboard-tapping monks, holed up in a $10,000-a-month adobe mansion in what the real estate agents here tout as "the Beverly Hills of San Diego," choose to "shed their containers" and hitch a ride to the Next Level on a spacecraft said to be trailing the Comet Hale-Bopp? Iowa? Kansas?
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON and NICK ANDERSON and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The 39 men and women who died in an apparent mass suicide here left behind mystical computer postings and matter-of-fact videos explaining that they were eager to graduate from their human shells and ascend into heaven on an alien spaceship--and to speed their way, they planned to whip up puddings tainted with coma-inducing sedatives. Authorities investigating the case said Thursday that the victims, who ranged in age from 20 to 72, meticulously planned their deaths.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | LARRY B. STAMMER and JOHN DART and JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Following a charismatic leader known as "the Representative" and taking their cue from the heavens--Comet Hale-Bopp--the men and women of the Heaven's Gate cult apparently believed they were leaving this week for a spaceship that would take them to a utopian "Next Kingdom." The complex theology and strident beliefs of 39 cult members, who died in an apparent mass suicide in the San Diego suburb of Rancho Santa Fe, apparently are spelled out in a voluminous tract they left behind.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was only last July that Heather Chronert answered the door of the San Diego Polo Club to find a pair of unexpected visitors: "Gentle, pale people,"--middle-aged men, she recalls, who proposed designing the club's World Wide Web site. At first skeptical, Chronert, the club's office manager, was soon won over by her visitors' "lavish, impeccable portfolio," which included among its offerings a "beautiful" site that paid homage to a famous rock star and actress: Madonna.
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