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Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant

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NEWS
August 21, 1986 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Citing a prolonged series of shutdowns and safety violations at the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, Mayor Tom Bradley of Los Angeles said Wednesday that if elected governor, he would move to close the troubled reactor, located about 20 miles southeast of the capital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Workers at the closed Rancho Seco Nuclear Plant will start cleaning radioactive water that was used to cool and shield spent fuel. The water will be filtered and diluted so it can spill off-site into creeks that feed the Cosumnes River. Emptying Rancho Seco's spent-fuel pool will cost $2.7 million. It is part of a plan to dismantle the nuclear plant, which was shut down by a popular vote in 1989. The water will carry tiny amounts of radioactive tritium, but low levels have been deemed safe.
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NEWS
March 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Officials at the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, conceding that they do not know the full extent of repairs needed at the plant, are hoping the latest in a long series of restart delays will be seen as a sign of increased attention to safety. Officials said Friday that the earliest the facility could begin operating is Monday.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A lawsuit filed in Sacramento Superior Court seeks to halt the decommissioning of the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant until effects of the shutdown on the environment are determined. The suit contends that closing the plant will worsen air pollution in the Central Valley because of the need for gas-fired plants and other sources to replace Rancho Seco's power generation. The suit was filed on behalf of UC Davis radiobiology professor Marvin Goldman, Daniel St.
NEWS
October 2, 1989
The president of the Sacramento Municipal Utility District board suggested that the utility should seek a "friendly takeover" by Pacific Gas & Electric. Joseph Buonaiuto said SMUD is hopelessly in debt and will remain so in the future because voters in June voted to close the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant. Any takeover would have to be approved by the district's voters. Buonaiuto said that since voters closed the nuclear plant, the utility has had to buy power from other agencies.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Federal regulators have delayed the removal of radioactive fuel rods from the Rancho Seco nuclear reactor because of a mysterious leak in the pool used to store spent fuel at the closed plant. The leak through the pool's stainless steel liner has been measured at up to a half-gallon an hour. Divers recently checked the pool for several days but could not detect the source of the seepage.
NEWS
October 2, 1989
The president of the Sacramento Municipal Utility District board suggested that the utility should seek a "friendly takeover" by Pacific Gas & Electric. Joseph Buonaiuto said SMUD is hopelessly in debt and will remain so in the future because voters in June voted to close the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant. Any takeover would have to be approved by the district's voters. Buonaiuto said that since voters closed the nuclear plant, the utility has had to buy power from other agencies.
NEWS
August 28, 1989
Directors of Sacramento's citizen-owned utility district voted to slow the dismantling of the Rancho Seco nuclear power facility while they study offers by private investors to operate it. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District board closed the plant June 7, one day after voters ordered the utility to cease operating the 15-year-old facility.
NEWS
July 1, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Three weeks after voters closed the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, five bidders stepped up Friday with offers to buy the plant and run it independently. Only one bidder--Quadrex Inc., a Campbell, Calif., nuclear engineering consulting firm--offered to reopen the facility as a nuclear plant. The others would repower it with fossil fuels--either natural gas or "clean-burning, coal-derived alternative fuels."
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Operators of the troubled Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, which is facing possible closure by voters June 6, were told by their own industry Wednesday that serious problems are likely to continue and that current political pressure could lead to unsafe actions by plant workers. "Our concern is that, since the fundamental conditions that led to the poor record of performance . . . and the recurring pattern of (troublesome) events . . .
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